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README.md

jenkins Cookbook

Build Status

Installs and configures Jenkins CI master & node slaves. Resource providers to support automation via jenkins-cli, including job create/update.

This project is managed by the CHEF Release Engineering team. For more information on the Release Engineering team's contribution, triage, and release process, please consult the CHEF Release Engineering OSS Management Guide.

Requirements

  • Chef 11 or higher
  • Ruby 1.9.3 or higher

Attributes

In order to keep the README managable and in sync with the attributes, this cookbook documents attributes inline. The usage instructions and default values for attributes can be found in the individual attribute files.

Examples

Documentation and examples are provided inline using YARD. The tests and fixture cookbooks in tests and tests/fixtures are intended to be a further source of examples.

Recipes

master

The master recipe will create the required directory structure and install jenkins. There are two installation methods, controlled by the node['jenkins']['master']['install_method'] attribute:

  • package - Install Jenkins from the official jenkins-ci.org packages
  • war - Download the latest version of the WAR file and configure it with Runit

java

By default, this cookbook does not install, manage, or manipulate a JDK, as that is outside of the scope of Jenkins. The package installation method will automatically pull in a valid Java if one does not exist, by the nature of package installers. However, the war installation method will require you to install a valid Java runtime. This very simple recipe installs OpenJDK 7 on the target system. If you need a more complex Java setup, you should use the community cookbook or write your own. For more information and warnings, please see the inline documentation in the jenkins::java recipe.

This pattern is not unique. RHEL Jenkins packages do not depend on a Java, since there are so many derivatives to choose from.

Resource/Provider

jenkins_command

This resource executes arbitrary commands against the Jenkins CLI, supporting the following actions:

:execute
jenkins_command 'safe-restart'

To reload the configuration from disk:

jenkins_command 'reload-configuration'

To prevent Jenkins from starting any new builds (in preparation for a shutdown):

jenkins_command 'quiet-down'

NOTE You must add your own not_if/only_if guards to the jenkins_command to prevent duplicate commands from executing. Just like Chef's core execute resource, the jenkins_command resource has no way of being idempotent.

jenkins_script

This resource executes arbitrary Java or Groovy commands against the Jenkins master. By the nature of this command, it is not idempotent.

jenkins_script 'println("This is Groovy code!")'
jenkins_script 'add_authentication' do
  command <<-EOH.gsub(/^ {4}/, '')
    import jenkins.model.*
    import hudson.security.*
    import org.jenkinsci.plugins.*

    def instance = Jenkins.getInstance()

    def githubRealm = new GithubSecurityRealm(
      'https://github.com',
      'https://api.github.com',
      'API_KEY',
      'API_SECRET'
    )
    instance.setSecurityRealm(githubRealm)

    def strategy = new FullControlOnceLoggedInAuthorizationStrategy()
    instance.setAuthorizationStrategy(strategy)

    instance.save()
  EOH
end

jenkins_credentials

NOTE The use of the Jenkins credentials resource requries the Jenkins credentials plugin. This plugin began shipping with Jenkins 1.536. On older Jenkins installations, you will need to install the credentials plugin at version 1.6 or higher to utilize this resource. On newer versions of Jenkins, this resource should work correctly.

Each credential can be referenced in job by its unique ID. You can set this ID when creating credential, and set the same ID in job configuration. To generate a unique ID, you can use linux command uuidgen.

This resource manages Jenkins credentials, supporting the following actions:

:create, :delete

The following type of credentials are supported:

  • Password - Basic username + password credentials.
  • Private Key - Credentials that use a username + private key (optionally protected with a passphrase).

The jenkins_credentials resource is actually the base resource for several resources that map directly back to a credentials type:

  • jenkins_password_credentials
  • jenkins_private_key_credentials

This uses the Jenkins Groovy API to create/delete credentials. It also supports whyrun mode.

The :create action idempotently creates a set of Jenkins credentials on the current node. The username attribute (also the name attribute) corresponds to the username of the credentials on the target node. You may also specify a description which is useful in credential identification.

# Create password credentials
jenkins_password_credentials 'wcoyote' do
  id 'f2361e6b-b8e0-4b2b-890b-82e85bc1a59f'
  description 'Wile E Coyote'
  password    'beepbeep'
end

# Create private key credentials
jenkins_private_key_credentials 'wcoyote' do
  id 'fa3aab48-4edc-446d-b1e2-1d89d86f4458'
  description 'Wile E Coyote'
  private_key "-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----\nMIIEpAIBAAKCAQ..."
end

# Private keys with a passphrase will also work
jenkins_private_key_credentials 'wcoyote' do
  description 'Eile E Coyote'
  private_key "-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----\nMIIEpAIBAAKCAQ..."
  passphrase  'beepbeep'
end

The :delete action idempotently removes a set of Jenkins credentials from the system. You can use the base jenkins_credentials resource or any of its children to perform the deletion.

jenkins_credentials 'wcoyote' do
  action :delete
end

jenkins_private_key_credentials 'wcoyote' do
  action :delete
end

NOTE Credentials in Jenkins can be created with 2 different "scopes" which determines where the credentials can be used:

  • GLOBAL - This credential is available to the object on which the credential is associated and all objects that are children of that object. Typically you would use global-scoped credentials for things that are needed by jobs.
  • SYSTEM - This credential is only available to the object on which the credential is associated. Typically you would use system-scoped credentials for things like email auth, slave connection, etc, i.e. where the Jenkins instance itself is using the credential. Unlike the global scope, this significantly restricts where the credential can be used, thereby providing a higher degree of confidentiality to the credential.

The credentials created with the jenkins_credentials are assigned a GLOBAL scope.

jenkins_job

This resource manages Jenkins jobs, supporting the following actions:

:create, :delete, :disable, :enable

The resource is fully idempotent and convergent. It also supports whyrun mode.

The :create action requires a Jenkins job config.xml. This config file must exist on the target node and contain a valid Jenkins job configuration file. Because the Jenkins CLI actually reads and generates its own copy of this file, do NOT write this configuration inside of the Jenkins job. We recommend putting them in Chef's file cache path:

xml = File.join(Chef::Config[:file_cache_path], 'bacon-config.xml')

# You could also use a `cookbook_file` or pure `file` resource to generate
# content at this path.
template xml do
  source 'custom-config.xml.erb'
end

# Create a jenkins job (default action is `:create`)
jenkins_job 'bacon' do
  config xml
end
jenkins_job 'bacon' do
  action :delete
end

You can disable a Jenkins job by specifying the :disable option. This will disable an existing job, if and only if that job exists and is enabled. If the job does not exist, an exception is raised.

jenkins_job 'bacon' do
  action :disable
end

You can enable a Jenkins job by specifying the :enable option. This will enable an existing job, if and only if that job exists and is disabled. If the job does not exist, an exception is raised.

jenkins_job 'bacon' do
  action :enable
end

jenkins_plugin

This resource manages Jenkins plugins, supporting the following actions:

:install, :uninstall, :enable, :disable

This uses the Jenkins CLI to install plugins. By default, it does a cold deploy, meaning the plugin is installed while Jenkins is still running. Some plugins may require you restart the Jenkins instance for their changed to take affect.

  • A plugin's dependencies are also installed by default, this behavior can be disabled by setting the install_deps attribute to false.
  • This resource does not install plugin dependencies from a a given hpi/jpi URL - you must specify all plugin dependencies or Jenkins may not startup correctly!

The :install action idempotently installs a Jenkins plugin on the current node. The name attribute corresponds to the name of the plugin on the Jenkins Update Center. You can also specify a particular version of the plugin to install. Finally, you can specify a full source URL or local path (on the node) to a plugin.

# Install the latest version of the greenballs plugin
jenkins_plugin 'greenballs'

# Install version 1.3 of the greenballs plugin
jenkins_plugin 'greenballs' do
  version '1.3'
end

# Install a plugin from a given hpi (or jpi)
jenkins_plugin 'greenballs' do
  source 'http://updates.jenkins-ci.org/download/plugins/greenballs/1.10/greenballs.hpi'
end

# Don't install a plugins dependencies
jenkins_plugin 'github-oauth' do
  install_deps false
end

Depending on the plugin, you may need to restart the Jenkins instance for the plugin to take affect:

Package installation method:

jenkins_plugin 'a_complicated_plugin' do
  notifies :restart, 'service[jenkins]', :immediately
end

War installation method:

jenkins_plugin 'a_complicated_plugin' do
  notifies :restart, 'runit_service[jenkins]', :immediately
end

For advanced users, this resource exposes an options attribute that will be passed to the installation command. For more information on the possible values of these options, pleaes consult the documentation for your Jenkins installation.

jenkins_plugin 'a_really_complicated_plugin' do
  options '-deploy -cold'
end

The :uninstall action removes (uninstalls) a Jenkins plugin idempotently on the current node.

jenkins_plugin 'greenballs' do
  action :uninstall
end

The :enable action enables a plugin. If the plugin is not installed, an exception is raised. If the plugin is already enabled, no action is taken.

jenkins_plugin 'greenballs' do
  action :enable
end

The :disable action disables a plugin. If the plugin is not installed, an exception is raised. If the plugin is already disabled, no action is taken.

jenkins_plugin 'greenballs' do
  action :disable
end

NOTE You may need to restart Jenkins after changing a plugin. Because this varies on a case-by-case basis (and because everyone chooses to manage their Jenkins infrastructure differently) this LWRP does NOT restart Jenkins for you.

jenkins_slave

This resource manages Jenkins slaves, supporting the following actions:

:create, :delete, :connect, :disconnect, :online, :offline

The following slave launch methods are supported:

  • JNLP/Java Web Start - Starts a slave by launching an agent program through JNLP. The launch in this case is initiated by the slave, thus slaves need not be IP reachable from the master (e.g. behind the firewall). This launch method is supported on *nix and Windows platforms.
  • SSH - Jenkins has a built-in SSH client implementation that it can use to talk to remote sshd daemon and start a slave agent. This is the most convenient and preferred method for Unix slaves, which normally has sshd out-of-the-box.

The jenkins_slave resource is actually the base resource for several resources that map directly back to a launch method:

  • jenkins_jnlp_slave - As JNLP Slave connections are slave initiated, this resource should be part of a slave's run list.
  • jenkins_ssh_slave - As SSH Slave connections are master initiated, this resource should be part of a master's run list.

The :create action idempotently creates a Jenkins slave on the master. The name attribute corresponds to the name of the slave (which is also used to uniquely identify the slave).

# Create a basic JNLP slave
jenkins_jnlp_slave 'builder' do
  description 'A generic slave builder'
  remote_fs   '/home/jenkins'
  labels      ['builder', 'linux']
end

# Create a slave launched via SSH
jenkins_ssh_slave 'executor' do
  description 'Run test suites'
  remote_fs   '/share/executor'
  labels      ['executor', 'freebsd', 'jail']

  # SSH specific attributes
  host        '172.11.12.53' # or 'slave.example.org'
  user        'jenkins'
  credentials 'wcoyote'
end

# A slave's executors, usage mode and availability can also be configured
jenkins_jnlp_slave 'smoke' do
  description     'Runs a series of high-level smoke tests'
  remote_fs       '/home/jenkins'
  executors       5
  usage_mode      'exclusive'
  availability    'demand'
  in_demand_delay 1
  idle_delay      3
  labels          ['runner', 'fast']
end

# Create a slave with a full environment
jenkins_jnlp_slave 'integration' do
  description 'Runs the high-level integration suite'
  remote_fs   '/home/jenkins'
  labels      ['integration', 'rails', 'ruby']
  environment(
    RAILS_ENV: 'test',
    GCC:       '1_000_000_000',
  )
end

# Windows JNLP slave
jenkins_windows_slave 'mywinslave' do
  remote_fs 'C:/jenkins'
  user       '.\Administrator'
  password   'MyPassword'
end

The :delete action idempotently removes a slave from the cluster. Any services used to manage the underlying slave process will also be disabled.

jenkins_jnlp_slave 'builder' do
  action :delete
end

jenkins_ssh_slave 'executor' do
  action :delete
end

The :connect action idempotently forces the master to reconnect to the specified slave. You can use the base jenkins_slave resource or any of its children to perform the connection.

jenkins_slave 'builder' do
  action :connect
end

jenkins_ssh_slave 'executor' do
  action :connect
end

The :disconnect action idempotently forces the master to disconnect the specified slave. You can use the base jenkins_slave resource or any of its children to perform the connection.

jenkins_slave 'builder' do
  action :disconnect
end

jenkins_ssh_slave 'executor' do
  action :disconnect
end

The :online action idempotently brings a slave back online. You can use the base jenkins_slave resource or any of its children to bring the slave online.

jenkins_slave 'builder' do
  action :online
end

jenkins_ssh_slave 'executor' do
  action :online
end

The :offline action idempotently takes a slave temporarily offline. An optional reason for going offline can be provided with the offline_reason attribute. You can use the base jenkins_slave resource or any of its children to take a slave offline.

jenkins_slave 'builder' do
  action :offline
end

jenkins_ssh_slave 'executor' do
  offline_reason 'ran out of energon'
  action :offline
end

NOTE It's worth noting the somewhat confusing differences between disconnecting and off-lining a slave:

  • Disconnect - Instantly closes the channel of communication between the master and slave. Currently executing jobs will be terminated immediately. If a slave is configured with an availability of always the master will attempt to reconnect to the slave.
  • Offline - Keeps the channel of communication between the master and slave open. Currently executing jobs will be allowed to finish, but no new jobs will be scheduled on the slave.

jenkins_user

This resource manages Jenkins users, supporting the following actions:

:create, :delete

This uses the Jenkins groovy API to create users.

The :create action idempotently creates a Jenkins user on the current node. The id attribute corresponds to the username of the id of the user on the target node. You may also specify a name, email, and list of SSH keys.

# Create a Jenkins user
jenkins_user 'grumpy'

# Create a Jenkins user with specific attributes
jenkins_user 'grumpy' do
  full_name    'Grumpy Dwarf'
  email        'grumpy@example.com'
  public_keys  ['ssh-rsa AAAAB3NzaC1y...']
end

The :delete action removes a Jenkins user from the system.

jenkins_user 'grumpy' do
  action :delete
end

Caveats

Authentication

If you use or plan to use authentication for your Jenkins cluster (which we highly recommend), you will need to set a special value in the run_context:

node.run_state[:jenkins_private_key]

The underlying executor class (which all HWRPs use) intelligently adds authentication information to the Jenkins CLI commands if this value is set. The method used to generate and populate this key-pair is left to the user:

# Using search
master = search(:node, 'fqdn:master.ci.example.com').first
node.run_state[:jenkins_private_key] = master['jenkins']['private_key']

# Using encrypted data bags and chef-sugar
private_key = encrypted_data_bag_item('jenkins', 'keys')['private_key']
node.run_state[:jenkins_private_key] = private_key

The associated public key must be set on a Jenkins user. You can use the jenkins_user resource to create this pairing. Here's an example that loads a keypair and assigns it appropiately:

jenkins_keys = encrypted_data_bag_item('jenkins', 'keys')

require 'openssl'
require 'net/ssh'

key = OpenSSL::PKey::RSA.new(jenkins_keys['private_key'])
private_key = key.to_pem
public_key = "#{key.ssh_type} #{[key.to_blob].pack('m0')}"

# Create the Jenkins user with the public key
jenkins_user 'chef' do
  public_keys [public_key]
end

# Set the private key on the Jenkins executor
node.run_state[:jenkins_private_key] = private_key

Please note that older versions of Jenkins (< 1.555) permitted login via CLI for a user defined in Jenkins configuration with an SSH public key but not present in the actual SecurityRealm, and this is no longer permitted. If an operation requires any special permission at all, you must authenticate as a real user. This means that if you have LDAP or GitHub OAuth based authn/authz enabled the user you are using for configuraiton tasks must have an associated account in the external services. Please see JENKINS-22346 for more details.

If (and only if) you have your Jenkins instance configured to use the PAM (Unix user/group database) security realm you can set the username and password the CLI uses via these two run_context values:

node.run_state[:jenkins_username]
node.run_state[:jenkins_password]

Proxies

If you need to pass through a proxy to communicate between your masters and slaves, you will need to set a special node attribute:

node['jenkins']['executor']['proxy']

The underlying executor class (which all HWRPs use) intelligently passes proxy information to the Jenkins CLI commands if this attribute is set. It should be set in the form HOST:PORT:

node.set['jenkins']['executor']['proxy'] = '1.2.3.4:5678'

Development

Please see the Contributing and Issue Reporting Guidelines.

License & Authors

Copyright 2010 VMware, Inc.
Copyright 2011 Fletcher Nichol
Copyright 2013-2014 Chef Software, Inc.

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.
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