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# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import numpy as np
from pandas.compat import zip
from pandas.core.dtypes.generic import ABCSeries, ABCIndex
from pandas.core.dtypes.missing import isna, notna
from pandas.core.dtypes.common import (
is_bool_dtype,
is_categorical_dtype,
is_object_dtype,
is_string_like,
is_list_like,
is_scalar,
is_integer,
is_re)
import pandas.core.common as com
from pandas.core.algorithms import take_1d
import pandas.compat as compat
from pandas.core.base import NoNewAttributesMixin
from pandas.util._decorators import Appender
import re
import pandas._libs.lib as lib
import pandas._libs.ops as libops
import warnings
import textwrap
import codecs
_cpython_optimized_encoders = (
"utf-8", "utf8", "latin-1", "latin1", "iso-8859-1", "mbcs", "ascii"
)
_cpython_optimized_decoders = _cpython_optimized_encoders + (
"utf-16", "utf-32"
)
_shared_docs = dict()
def _get_array_list(arr, others):
"""
Auxiliary function for :func:`str_cat`
Parameters
----------
arr : ndarray
The left-most ndarray of the concatenation
others : list, ndarray, Series
The rest of the content to concatenate. If list of list-likes,
all elements must be passable to ``np.asarray``.
Returns
-------
list
List of all necessary arrays
"""
from pandas.core.series import Series
if len(others) and isinstance(com.values_from_object(others)[0],
(list, np.ndarray, Series)):
arrays = [arr] + list(others)
else:
arrays = [arr, others]
return [np.asarray(x, dtype=object) for x in arrays]
def str_cat(arr, others=None, sep=None, na_rep=None):
"""
Auxiliary function for :meth:`str.cat`
If `others` is specified, this function concatenates the Series/Index
and elements of `others` element-wise.
If `others` is not being passed then all values in the Series are
concatenated in a single string with a given `sep`.
Parameters
----------
others : list-like, or list of list-likes, optional
List-likes (or a list of them) of the same length as calling object.
If None, returns str concatenating strings of the Series.
sep : string or None, default None
If None, concatenates without any separator.
na_rep : string or None, default None
If None, NA in the series are ignored.
Returns
-------
concat
ndarray containing concatenated results (if `others is not None`)
or str (if `others is None`)
"""
if sep is None:
sep = ''
if others is not None:
arrays = _get_array_list(arr, others)
n = _length_check(arrays)
masks = np.array([isna(x) for x in arrays])
cats = None
if na_rep is None:
na_mask = np.logical_or.reduce(masks, axis=0)
result = np.empty(n, dtype=object)
np.putmask(result, na_mask, np.nan)
notmask = ~na_mask
tuples = zip(*[x[notmask] for x in arrays])
cats = [sep.join(tup) for tup in tuples]
result[notmask] = cats
else:
for i, x in enumerate(arrays):
x = np.where(masks[i], na_rep, x)
if cats is None:
cats = x
else:
cats = cats + sep + x
result = cats
return result
else:
arr = np.asarray(arr, dtype=object)
mask = isna(arr)
if na_rep is None and mask.any():
if sep == '':
na_rep = ''
else:
return sep.join(arr[notna(arr)])
return sep.join(np.where(mask, na_rep, arr))
def _length_check(others):
n = None
for x in others:
try:
if n is None:
n = len(x)
elif len(x) != n:
raise ValueError('All arrays must be same length')
except TypeError:
raise ValueError('Must pass arrays containing strings to str_cat')
return n
def _na_map(f, arr, na_result=np.nan, dtype=object):
# should really _check_ for NA
return _map(f, arr, na_mask=True, na_value=na_result, dtype=dtype)
def _map(f, arr, na_mask=False, na_value=np.nan, dtype=object):
if not len(arr):
return np.ndarray(0, dtype=dtype)
if isinstance(arr, ABCSeries):
arr = arr.values
if not isinstance(arr, np.ndarray):
arr = np.asarray(arr, dtype=object)
if na_mask:
mask = isna(arr)
try:
convert = not all(mask)
result = lib.map_infer_mask(arr, f, mask.view(np.uint8), convert)
except (TypeError, AttributeError) as e:
# Reraise the exception if callable `f` got wrong number of args.
# The user may want to be warned by this, instead of getting NaN
if compat.PY2:
p_err = r'takes (no|(exactly|at (least|most)) ?\d+) arguments?'
else:
p_err = (r'((takes)|(missing)) (?(2)from \d+ to )?\d+ '
r'(?(3)required )positional arguments?')
if len(e.args) >= 1 and re.search(p_err, e.args[0]):
raise e
def g(x):
try:
return f(x)
except (TypeError, AttributeError):
return na_value
return _map(g, arr, dtype=dtype)
if na_value is not np.nan:
np.putmask(result, mask, na_value)
if result.dtype == object:
result = lib.maybe_convert_objects(result)
return result
else:
return lib.map_infer(arr, f)
def str_count(arr, pat, flags=0):
"""
Count occurrences of pattern in each string of the Series/Index.
This function is used to count the number of times a particular regex
pattern is repeated in each of the string elements of the
:class:`~pandas.Series`.
Parameters
----------
pat : str
Valid regular expression.
flags : int, default 0, meaning no flags
Flags for the `re` module. For a complete list, `see here
<https://docs.python.org/3/howto/regex.html#compilation-flags>`_.
**kwargs
For compatibility with other string methods. Not used.
Returns
-------
counts : Series or Index
Same type as the calling object containing the integer counts.
Notes
-----
Some characters need to be escaped when passing in `pat`.
eg. ``'$'`` has a special meaning in regex and must be escaped when
finding this literal character.
See Also
--------
re : Standard library module for regular expressions.
str.count : Standard library version, without regular expression support.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['A', 'B', 'Aaba', 'Baca', np.nan, 'CABA', 'cat'])
>>> s.str.count('a')
0 0.0
1 0.0
2 2.0
3 2.0
4 NaN
5 0.0
6 1.0
dtype: float64
Escape ``'$'`` to find the literal dollar sign.
>>> s = pd.Series(['$', 'B', 'Aab$', '$$ca', 'C$B$', 'cat'])
>>> s.str.count('\\$')
0 1
1 0
2 1
3 2
4 2
5 0
dtype: int64
This is also available on Index
>>> pd.Index(['A', 'A', 'Aaba', 'cat']).str.count('a')
Int64Index([0, 0, 2, 1], dtype='int64')
"""
regex = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
f = lambda x: len(regex.findall(x))
return _na_map(f, arr, dtype=int)
def str_contains(arr, pat, case=True, flags=0, na=np.nan, regex=True):
"""
Test if pattern or regex is contained within a string of a Series or Index.
Return boolean Series or Index based on whether a given pattern or regex is
contained within a string of a Series or Index.
Parameters
----------
pat : str
Character sequence or regular expression.
case : bool, default True
If True, case sensitive.
flags : int, default 0 (no flags)
Flags to pass through to the re module, e.g. re.IGNORECASE.
na : default NaN
Fill value for missing values.
regex : bool, default True
If True, assumes the pat is a regular expression.
If False, treats the pat as a literal string.
Returns
-------
Series or Index of boolean values
A Series or Index of boolean values indicating whether the
given pattern is contained within the string of each element
of the Series or Index.
See Also
--------
match : analogous, but stricter, relying on re.match instead of re.search
Series.str.startswith : Test if the start of each string element matches a
pattern.
Series.str.endswith : Same as startswith, but tests the end of string.
Examples
--------
Returning a Series of booleans using only a literal pattern.
>>> s1 = pd.Series(['Mouse', 'dog', 'house and parrot', '23', np.NaN])
>>> s1.str.contains('og', regex=False)
0 False
1 True
2 False
3 False
4 NaN
dtype: object
Returning an Index of booleans using only a literal pattern.
>>> ind = pd.Index(['Mouse', 'dog', 'house and parrot', '23.0', np.NaN])
>>> ind.str.contains('23', regex=False)
Index([False, False, False, True, nan], dtype='object')
Specifying case sensitivity using `case`.
>>> s1.str.contains('oG', case=True, regex=True)
0 False
1 False
2 False
3 False
4 NaN
dtype: object
Specifying `na` to be `False` instead of `NaN` replaces NaN values
with `False`. If Series or Index does not contain NaN values
the resultant dtype will be `bool`, otherwise, an `object` dtype.
>>> s1.str.contains('og', na=False, regex=True)
0 False
1 True
2 False
3 False
4 False
dtype: bool
Returning 'house' or 'dog' when either expression occurs in a string.
>>> s1.str.contains('house|dog', regex=True)
0 False
1 True
2 True
3 False
4 NaN
dtype: object
Ignoring case sensitivity using `flags` with regex.
>>> import re
>>> s1.str.contains('PARROT', flags=re.IGNORECASE, regex=True)
0 False
1 False
2 True
3 False
4 NaN
dtype: object
Returning any digit using regular expression.
>>> s1.str.contains('\\d', regex=True)
0 False
1 False
2 False
3 True
4 NaN
dtype: object
Ensure `pat` is a not a literal pattern when `regex` is set to True.
Note in the following example one might expect only `s2[1]` and `s2[3]` to
return `True`. However, '.0' as a regex matches any character
followed by a 0.
>>> s2 = pd.Series(['40','40.0','41','41.0','35'])
>>> s2.str.contains('.0', regex=True)
0 True
1 True
2 False
3 True
4 False
dtype: bool
"""
if regex:
if not case:
flags |= re.IGNORECASE
regex = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
if regex.groups > 0:
warnings.warn("This pattern has match groups. To actually get the"
" groups, use str.extract.", UserWarning,
stacklevel=3)
f = lambda x: bool(regex.search(x))
else:
if case:
f = lambda x: pat in x
else:
upper_pat = pat.upper()
f = lambda x: upper_pat in x
uppered = _na_map(lambda x: x.upper(), arr)
return _na_map(f, uppered, na, dtype=bool)
return _na_map(f, arr, na, dtype=bool)
def str_startswith(arr, pat, na=np.nan):
"""
Test if the start of each string element matches a pattern.
Equivalent to :meth:`str.startswith`.
Parameters
----------
pat : str
Character sequence. Regular expressions are not accepted.
na : object, default NaN
Object shown if element tested is not a string.
Returns
-------
Series or Index of bool
A Series of booleans indicating whether the given pattern matches
the start of each string element.
See Also
--------
str.startswith : Python standard library string method.
Series.str.endswith : Same as startswith, but tests the end of string.
Series.str.contains : Tests if string element contains a pattern.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['bat', 'Bear', 'cat', np.nan])
>>> s
0 bat
1 Bear
2 cat
3 NaN
dtype: object
>>> s.str.startswith('b')
0 True
1 False
2 False
3 NaN
dtype: object
Specifying `na` to be `False` instead of `NaN`.
>>> s.str.startswith('b', na=False)
0 True
1 False
2 False
3 False
dtype: bool
"""
f = lambda x: x.startswith(pat)
return _na_map(f, arr, na, dtype=bool)
def str_endswith(arr, pat, na=np.nan):
"""
Test if the end of each string element matches a pattern.
Equivalent to :meth:`str.endswith`.
Parameters
----------
pat : str
Character sequence. Regular expressions are not accepted.
na : object, default NaN
Object shown if element tested is not a string.
Returns
-------
Series or Index of bool
A Series of booleans indicating whether the given pattern matches
the end of each string element.
See Also
--------
str.endswith : Python standard library string method.
Series.str.startswith : Same as endswith, but tests the start of string.
Series.str.contains : Tests if string element contains a pattern.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['bat', 'bear', 'caT', np.nan])
>>> s
0 bat
1 bear
2 caT
3 NaN
dtype: object
>>> s.str.endswith('t')
0 True
1 False
2 False
3 NaN
dtype: object
Specifying `na` to be `False` instead of `NaN`.
>>> s.str.endswith('t', na=False)
0 True
1 False
2 False
3 False
dtype: bool
"""
f = lambda x: x.endswith(pat)
return _na_map(f, arr, na, dtype=bool)
def str_replace(arr, pat, repl, n=-1, case=None, flags=0, regex=True):
r"""
Replace occurrences of pattern/regex in the Series/Index with
some other string. Equivalent to :meth:`str.replace` or
:func:`re.sub`.
Parameters
----------
pat : string or compiled regex
String can be a character sequence or regular expression.
.. versionadded:: 0.20.0
`pat` also accepts a compiled regex.
repl : string or callable
Replacement string or a callable. The callable is passed the regex
match object and must return a replacement string to be used.
See :func:`re.sub`.
.. versionadded:: 0.20.0
`repl` also accepts a callable.
n : int, default -1 (all)
Number of replacements to make from start
case : boolean, default None
- If True, case sensitive (the default if `pat` is a string)
- Set to False for case insensitive
- Cannot be set if `pat` is a compiled regex
flags : int, default 0 (no flags)
- re module flags, e.g. re.IGNORECASE
- Cannot be set if `pat` is a compiled regex
regex : boolean, default True
- If True, assumes the passed-in pattern is a regular expression.
- If False, treats the pattern as a literal string
- Cannot be set to False if `pat` is a compiled regex or `repl` is
a callable.
.. versionadded:: 0.23.0
Returns
-------
Series or Index of object
A copy of the object with all matching occurrences of `pat` replaced by
`repl`.
Raises
------
ValueError
* if `regex` is False and `repl` is a callable or `pat` is a compiled
regex
* if `pat` is a compiled regex and `case` or `flags` is set
Notes
-----
When `pat` is a compiled regex, all flags should be included in the
compiled regex. Use of `case`, `flags`, or `regex=False` with a compiled
regex will raise an error.
Examples
--------
When `pat` is a string and `regex` is True (the default), the given `pat`
is compiled as a regex. When `repl` is a string, it replaces matching
regex patterns as with :meth:`re.sub`. NaN value(s) in the Series are
left as is:
>>> pd.Series(['foo', 'fuz', np.nan]).str.replace('f.', 'ba', regex=True)
0 bao
1 baz
2 NaN
dtype: object
When `pat` is a string and `regex` is False, every `pat` is replaced with
`repl` as with :meth:`str.replace`:
>>> pd.Series(['f.o', 'fuz', np.nan]).str.replace('f.', 'ba', regex=False)
0 bao
1 fuz
2 NaN
dtype: object
When `repl` is a callable, it is called on every `pat` using
:func:`re.sub`. The callable should expect one positional argument
(a regex object) and return a string.
To get the idea:
>>> pd.Series(['foo', 'fuz', np.nan]).str.replace('f', repr)
0 <_sre.SRE_Match object; span=(0, 1), match='f'>oo
1 <_sre.SRE_Match object; span=(0, 1), match='f'>uz
2 NaN
dtype: object
Reverse every lowercase alphabetic word:
>>> repl = lambda m: m.group(0)[::-1]
>>> pd.Series(['foo 123', 'bar baz', np.nan]).str.replace(r'[a-z]+', repl)
0 oof 123
1 rab zab
2 NaN
dtype: object
Using regex groups (extract second group and swap case):
>>> pat = r"(?P<one>\w+) (?P<two>\w+) (?P<three>\w+)"
>>> repl = lambda m: m.group('two').swapcase()
>>> pd.Series(['One Two Three', 'Foo Bar Baz']).str.replace(pat, repl)
0 tWO
1 bAR
dtype: object
Using a compiled regex with flags
>>> regex_pat = re.compile(r'FUZ', flags=re.IGNORECASE)
>>> pd.Series(['foo', 'fuz', np.nan]).str.replace(regex_pat, 'bar')
0 foo
1 bar
2 NaN
dtype: object
"""
# Check whether repl is valid (GH 13438, GH 15055)
if not (is_string_like(repl) or callable(repl)):
raise TypeError("repl must be a string or callable")
is_compiled_re = is_re(pat)
if regex:
if is_compiled_re:
if (case is not None) or (flags != 0):
raise ValueError("case and flags cannot be set"
" when pat is a compiled regex")
else:
# not a compiled regex
# set default case
if case is None:
case = True
# add case flag, if provided
if case is False:
flags |= re.IGNORECASE
if is_compiled_re or len(pat) > 1 or flags or callable(repl):
n = n if n >= 0 else 0
compiled = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
f = lambda x: compiled.sub(repl=repl, string=x, count=n)
else:
f = lambda x: x.replace(pat, repl, n)
else:
if is_compiled_re:
raise ValueError("Cannot use a compiled regex as replacement "
"pattern with regex=False")
if callable(repl):
raise ValueError("Cannot use a callable replacement when "
"regex=False")
f = lambda x: x.replace(pat, repl, n)
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_repeat(arr, repeats):
"""
Duplicate each string in the Series or Index.
Parameters
----------
repeats : int or sequence of int
Same value for all (int) or different value per (sequence).
Returns
-------
Series or Index of object
Series or Index of repeated string objects specified by
input parameter repeats.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['a', 'b', 'c'])
>>> s
0 a
1 b
2 c
Single int repeats string in Series
>>> s.str.repeat(repeats=2)
0 aa
1 bb
2 cc
Sequence of int repeats corresponding string in Series
>>> s.str.repeat(repeats=[1, 2, 3])
0 a
1 bb
2 ccc
"""
if is_scalar(repeats):
def rep(x):
try:
return compat.binary_type.__mul__(x, repeats)
except TypeError:
return compat.text_type.__mul__(x, repeats)
return _na_map(rep, arr)
else:
def rep(x, r):
try:
return compat.binary_type.__mul__(x, r)
except TypeError:
return compat.text_type.__mul__(x, r)
repeats = np.asarray(repeats, dtype=object)
result = libops.vec_binop(com.values_from_object(arr), repeats, rep)
return result
def str_match(arr, pat, case=True, flags=0, na=np.nan):
"""
Determine if each string matches a regular expression.
Parameters
----------
pat : string
Character sequence or regular expression
case : boolean, default True
If True, case sensitive
flags : int, default 0 (no flags)
re module flags, e.g. re.IGNORECASE
na : default NaN, fill value for missing values.
Returns
-------
Series/array of boolean values
See Also
--------
contains : analogous, but less strict, relying on re.search instead of
re.match
extract : extract matched groups
"""
if not case:
flags |= re.IGNORECASE
regex = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
dtype = bool
f = lambda x: bool(regex.match(x))
return _na_map(f, arr, na, dtype=dtype)
def _get_single_group_name(rx):
try:
return list(rx.groupindex.keys()).pop()
except IndexError:
return None
def _groups_or_na_fun(regex):
"""Used in both extract_noexpand and extract_frame"""
if regex.groups == 0:
raise ValueError("pattern contains no capture groups")
empty_row = [np.nan] * regex.groups
def f(x):
if not isinstance(x, compat.string_types):
return empty_row
m = regex.search(x)
if m:
return [np.nan if item is None else item for item in m.groups()]
else:
return empty_row
return f
def _str_extract_noexpand(arr, pat, flags=0):
"""
Find groups in each string in the Series using passed regular
expression. This function is called from
str_extract(expand=False), and can return Series, DataFrame, or
Index.
"""
from pandas import DataFrame, Index
regex = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
groups_or_na = _groups_or_na_fun(regex)
if regex.groups == 1:
result = np.array([groups_or_na(val)[0] for val in arr], dtype=object)
name = _get_single_group_name(regex)
else:
if isinstance(arr, Index):
raise ValueError("only one regex group is supported with Index")
name = None
names = dict(zip(regex.groupindex.values(), regex.groupindex.keys()))
columns = [names.get(1 + i, i) for i in range(regex.groups)]
if arr.empty:
result = DataFrame(columns=columns, dtype=object)
else:
result = DataFrame(
[groups_or_na(val) for val in arr],
columns=columns,
index=arr.index,
dtype=object)
return result, name
def _str_extract_frame(arr, pat, flags=0):
"""
For each subject string in the Series, extract groups from the
first match of regular expression pat. This function is called from
str_extract(expand=True), and always returns a DataFrame.
"""
from pandas import DataFrame
regex = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
groups_or_na = _groups_or_na_fun(regex)
names = dict(zip(regex.groupindex.values(), regex.groupindex.keys()))
columns = [names.get(1 + i, i) for i in range(regex.groups)]
if len(arr) == 0:
return DataFrame(columns=columns, dtype=object)
try:
result_index = arr.index
except AttributeError:
result_index = None
return DataFrame(
[groups_or_na(val) for val in arr],
columns=columns,
index=result_index,
dtype=object)
def str_extract(arr, pat, flags=0, expand=True):
r"""
Extract capture groups in the regex `pat` as columns in a DataFrame.
For each subject string in the Series, extract groups from the
first match of regular expression `pat`.
Parameters
----------
pat : string
Regular expression pattern with capturing groups.
flags : int, default 0 (no flags)
Flags from the ``re`` module, e.g. ``re.IGNORECASE``, that
modify regular expression matching for things like case,
spaces, etc. For more details, see :mod:`re`.
expand : bool, default True
If True, return DataFrame with one column per capture group.
If False, return a Series/Index if there is one capture group
or DataFrame if there are multiple capture groups.
.. versionadded:: 0.18.0
Returns
-------
DataFrame or Series or Index
A DataFrame with one row for each subject string, and one
column for each group. Any capture group names in regular
expression pat will be used for column names; otherwise
capture group numbers will be used. The dtype of each result
column is always object, even when no match is found. If
``expand=False`` and pat has only one capture group, then
return a Series (if subject is a Series) or Index (if subject
is an Index).
See Also
--------
extractall : returns all matches (not just the first match)
Examples
--------
A pattern with two groups will return a DataFrame with two columns.
Non-matches will be NaN.
>>> s = pd.Series(['a1', 'b2', 'c3'])
>>> s.str.extract(r'([ab])(\d)')
0 1
0 a 1
1 b 2
2 NaN NaN
A pattern may contain optional groups.
>>> s.str.extract(r'([ab])?(\d)')
0 1
0 a 1
1 b 2
2 NaN 3
Named groups will become column names in the result.
>>> s.str.extract(r'(?P<letter>[ab])(?P<digit>\d)')
letter digit
0 a 1
1 b 2
2 NaN NaN
A pattern with one group will return a DataFrame with one column
if expand=True.
>>> s.str.extract(r'[ab](\d)', expand=True)
0
0 1
1 2
2 NaN
A pattern with one group will return a Series if expand=False.
>>> s.str.extract(r'[ab](\d)', expand=False)
0 1
1 2
2 NaN
dtype: object
"""
if not isinstance(expand, bool):
raise ValueError("expand must be True or False")
if expand:
return _str_extract_frame(arr._orig, pat, flags=flags)
else:
result, name = _str_extract_noexpand(arr._parent, pat, flags=flags)
return arr._wrap_result(result, name=name, expand=expand)
def str_extractall(arr, pat, flags=0):
r"""
For each subject string in the Series, extract groups from all
matches of regular expression pat. When each subject string in the
Series has exactly one match, extractall(pat).xs(0, level='match')
is the same as extract(pat).
.. versionadded:: 0.18.0
Parameters
----------
pat : str
Regular expression pattern with capturing groups.
flags : int, default 0 (no flags)
A ``re`` module flag, for example ``re.IGNORECASE``. These allow
to modify regular expression matching for things like case, spaces,
etc. Multiple flags can be combined with the bitwise OR operator,
for example ``re.IGNORECASE | re.MULTILINE``.
Returns
-------
DataFrame
A ``DataFrame`` with one row for each match, and one column for each
group. Its rows have a ``MultiIndex`` with first levels that come from
the subject ``Series``. The last level is named 'match' and indexes the
matches in each item of the ``Series``. Any capture group names in
regular expression pat will be used for column names; otherwise capture
group numbers will be used.
See Also
--------
extract : returns first match only (not all matches)
Examples
--------
A pattern with one group will return a DataFrame with one column.
Indices with no matches will not appear in the result.
>>> s = pd.Series(["a1a2", "b1", "c1"], index=["A", "B", "C"])
>>> s.str.extractall(r"[ab](\d)")
0
match
A 0 1
1 2
B 0 1
Capture group names are used for column names of the result.
>>> s.str.extractall(r"[ab](?P<digit>\d)")
digit
match
A 0 1
1 2
B 0 1
A pattern with two groups will return a DataFrame with two columns.
>>> s.str.extractall(r"(?P<letter>[ab])(?P<digit>\d)")
letter digit
match
A 0 a 1
1 a 2
B 0 b 1
Optional groups that do not match are NaN in the result.
>>> s.str.extractall(r"(?P<letter>[ab])?(?P<digit>\d)")
letter digit
match
A 0 a 1
1 a 2
B 0 b 1
C 0 NaN 1
"""
regex = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
# the regex must contain capture groups.
if regex.groups == 0:
raise ValueError("pattern contains no capture groups")
if isinstance(arr, ABCIndex):
arr = arr.to_series().reset_index(drop=True)
names = dict(zip(regex.groupindex.values(), regex.groupindex.keys()))
columns = [names.get(1 + i, i) for i in range(regex.groups)]
match_list = []
index_list = []
is_mi = arr.index.nlevels > 1
for subject_key, subject in arr.iteritems():
if isinstance(subject, compat.string_types):
if not is_mi:
subject_key = (subject_key, )
for match_i, match_tuple in enumerate(regex.findall(subject)):
if isinstance(match_tuple, compat.string_types):
match_tuple = (match_tuple,)
na_tuple = [np.NaN if group == "" else group
for group in match_tuple]
match_list.append(na_tuple)
result_key = tuple(subject_key + (match_i, ))
index_list.append(result_key)
from pandas import MultiIndex
index = MultiIndex.from_tuples(
index_list, names=arr.index.names + ["match"])
result = arr._constructor_expanddim(match_list, index=index,
columns=columns)
return result
def str_get_dummies(arr, sep='|'):
"""
Split each string in the Series by sep and return a frame of
dummy/indicator variables.
Parameters
----------
sep : string, default "|"
String to split on.
Returns
-------
dummies : DataFrame
Examples
--------
>>> pd.Series(['a|b', 'a', 'a|c']).str.get_dummies()
a b c
0 1 1 0
1 1 0 0
2 1 0 1
>>> pd.Series(['a|b', np.nan, 'a|c']).str.get_dummies()
a b c
0 1 1 0
1 0 0 0
2 1 0 1
See Also
--------
pandas.get_dummies
"""
arr = arr.fillna('')
try:
arr = sep + arr + sep
except TypeError:
arr = sep + arr.astype(str) + sep
tags = set()
for ts in arr.str.split(sep):
tags.update(ts)
tags = sorted(tags - {""})
dummies = np.empty((len(arr), len(tags)), dtype=np.int64)
for i, t in enumerate(tags):
pat = sep + t + sep
dummies[:, i] = lib.map_infer(arr.values, lambda x: pat in x)
return dummies, tags
def str_join(arr, sep):
"""
Join lists contained as elements in the Series/Index with passed delimiter.
If the elements of a Series are lists themselves, join the content of these
lists using the delimiter passed to the function.
This function is an equivalent to :meth:`str.join`.
Parameters
----------
sep : str
Delimiter to use between list entries.
Returns
-------
Series/Index: object
The list entries concatenated by intervening occurrences of the
delimiter.
Raises
-------
AttributeError
If the supplied Series contains neither strings nor lists.
Notes
-----
If any of the list items is not a string object, the result of the join
will be `NaN`.
See Also
--------
str.join : Standard library version of this method.
Series.str.split : Split strings around given separator/delimiter.
Examples
--------
Example with a list that contains non-string elements.
>>> s = pd.Series([['lion', 'elephant', 'zebra'],
... [1.1, 2.2, 3.3],
... ['cat', np.nan, 'dog'],
... ['cow', 4.5, 'goat'],
... ['duck', ['swan', 'fish'], 'guppy']])
>>> s
0 [lion, elephant, zebra]
1 [1.1, 2.2, 3.3]
2 [cat, nan, dog]
3 [cow, 4.5, goat]
4 [duck, [swan, fish], guppy]
dtype: object
Join all lists using a '-'. The lists containing object(s) of types other
than str will produce a NaN.
>>> s.str.join('-')
0 lion-elephant-zebra
1 NaN
2 NaN
3 NaN
4 NaN
dtype: object
"""
return _na_map(sep.join, arr)
def str_findall(arr, pat, flags=0):
"""
Find all occurrences of pattern or regular expression in the Series/Index.
Equivalent to applying :func:`re.findall` to all the elements in the
Series/Index.
Parameters
----------
pat : string
Pattern or regular expression.
flags : int, default 0
``re`` module flags, e.g. `re.IGNORECASE` (default is 0, which means
no flags).
Returns
-------
Series/Index of lists of strings
All non-overlapping matches of pattern or regular expression in each
string of this Series/Index.
See Also
--------
count : Count occurrences of pattern or regular expression in each string
of the Series/Index.
extractall : For each string in the Series, extract groups from all matches
of regular expression and return a DataFrame with one row for each
match and one column for each group.
re.findall : The equivalent ``re`` function to all non-overlapping matches
of pattern or regular expression in string, as a list of strings.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['Lion', 'Monkey', 'Rabbit'])
The search for the pattern 'Monkey' returns one match:
>>> s.str.findall('Monkey')
0 []
1 [Monkey]
2 []
dtype: object
On the other hand, the search for the pattern 'MONKEY' doesn't return any
match:
>>> s.str.findall('MONKEY')
0 []
1 []
2 []
dtype: object
Flags can be added to the pattern or regular expression. For instance,
to find the pattern 'MONKEY' ignoring the case:
>>> import re
>>> s.str.findall('MONKEY', flags=re.IGNORECASE)
0 []
1 [Monkey]
2 []
dtype: object
When the pattern matches more than one string in the Series, all matches
are returned:
>>> s.str.findall('on')
0 [on]
1 [on]
2 []
dtype: object
Regular expressions are supported too. For instance, the search for all the
strings ending with the word 'on' is shown next:
>>> s.str.findall('on$')
0 [on]
1 []
2 []
dtype: object
If the pattern is found more than once in the same string, then a list of
multiple strings is returned:
>>> s.str.findall('b')
0 []
1 []
2 [b, b]
dtype: object
"""
regex = re.compile(pat, flags=flags)
return _na_map(regex.findall, arr)
def str_find(arr, sub, start=0, end=None, side='left'):
"""
Return indexes in each strings in the Series/Index where the
substring is fully contained between [start:end]. Return -1 on failure.
Parameters
----------
sub : str
Substring being searched
start : int
Left edge index
end : int
Right edge index
side : {'left', 'right'}, default 'left'
Specifies a starting side, equivalent to ``find`` or ``rfind``
Returns
-------
found : Series/Index of integer values
"""
if not isinstance(sub, compat.string_types):
msg = 'expected a string object, not {0}'
raise TypeError(msg.format(type(sub).__name__))
if side == 'left':
method = 'find'
elif side == 'right':
method = 'rfind'
else: # pragma: no cover
raise ValueError('Invalid side')
if end is None:
f = lambda x: getattr(x, method)(sub, start)
else:
f = lambda x: getattr(x, method)(sub, start, end)
return _na_map(f, arr, dtype=int)
def str_index(arr, sub, start=0, end=None, side='left'):
if not isinstance(sub, compat.string_types):
msg = 'expected a string object, not {0}'
raise TypeError(msg.format(type(sub).__name__))
if side == 'left':
method = 'index'
elif side == 'right':
method = 'rindex'
else: # pragma: no cover
raise ValueError('Invalid side')
if end is None:
f = lambda x: getattr(x, method)(sub, start)
else:
f = lambda x: getattr(x, method)(sub, start, end)
return _na_map(f, arr, dtype=int)
def str_pad(arr, width, side='left', fillchar=' '):
"""
Pad strings in the Series/Index with an additional character to
specified side.
Parameters
----------
width : int
Minimum width of resulting string; additional characters will be filled
with spaces
side : {'left', 'right', 'both'}, default 'left'
fillchar : str
Additional character for filling, default is whitespace
Returns
-------
padded : Series/Index of objects
"""
if not isinstance(fillchar, compat.string_types):
msg = 'fillchar must be a character, not {0}'
raise TypeError(msg.format(type(fillchar).__name__))
if len(fillchar) != 1:
raise TypeError('fillchar must be a character, not str')
if not is_integer(width):
msg = 'width must be of integer type, not {0}'
raise TypeError(msg.format(type(width).__name__))
if side == 'left':
f = lambda x: x.rjust(width, fillchar)
elif side == 'right':
f = lambda x: x.ljust(width, fillchar)
elif side == 'both':
f = lambda x: x.center(width, fillchar)
else: # pragma: no cover
raise ValueError('Invalid side')
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_split(arr, pat=None, n=None):
if pat is None:
if n is None or n == 0:
n = -1
f = lambda x: x.split(pat, n)
else:
if len(pat) == 1:
if n is None or n == 0:
n = -1
f = lambda x: x.split(pat, n)
else:
if n is None or n == -1:
n = 0
regex = re.compile(pat)
f = lambda x: regex.split(x, maxsplit=n)
res = _na_map(f, arr)
return res
def str_rsplit(arr, pat=None, n=None):
if n is None or n == 0:
n = -1
f = lambda x: x.rsplit(pat, n)
res = _na_map(f, arr)
return res
def str_slice(arr, start=None, stop=None, step=None):
"""
Slice substrings from each element in the Series/Index
Parameters
----------
start : int or None
stop : int or None
step : int or None
Returns
-------
sliced : Series/Index of objects
"""
obj = slice(start, stop, step)
f = lambda x: x[obj]
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_slice_replace(arr, start=None, stop=None, repl=None):
"""
Replace a positional slice of a string with another value.
Parameters
----------
start : int, optional
Left index position to use for the slice. If not specified (None),
the slice is unbounded on the left, i.e. slice from the start
of the string.
stop : int, optional
Right index position to use for the slice. If not specified (None),
the slice is unbounded on the right, i.e. slice until the
end of the string.
repl : str, optional
String for replacement. If not specified (None), the sliced region
is replaced with an empty string.
Returns
-------
replaced : Series or Index
Same type as the original object.
See Also
--------
Series.str.slice : Just slicing without replacement.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['a', 'ab', 'abc', 'abdc', 'abcde'])
>>> s
0 a
1 ab
2 abc
3 abdc
4 abcde
dtype: object
Specify just `start`, meaning replace `start` until the end of the
string with `repl`.
>>> s.str.slice_replace(1, repl='X')
0 aX
1 aX
2 aX
3 aX
4 aX
dtype: object
Specify just `stop`, meaning the start of the string to `stop` is replaced
with `repl`, and the rest of the string is included.
>>> s.str.slice_replace(stop=2, repl='X')
0 X
1 X
2 Xc
3 Xdc
4 Xcde
dtype: object
Specify `start` and `stop`, meaning the slice from `start` to `stop` is
replaced with `repl`. Everything before or after `start` and `stop` is
included as is.
>>> s.str.slice_replace(start=1, stop=3, repl='X')
0 aX
1 aX
2 aX
3 aXc
4 aXde
dtype: object
"""
if repl is None:
repl = ''
def f(x):
if x[start:stop] == '':
local_stop = start
else:
local_stop = stop
y = ''
if start is not None:
y += x[:start]
y += repl
if stop is not None:
y += x[local_stop:]
return y
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_strip(arr, to_strip=None, side='both'):
"""
Strip whitespace (including newlines) from each string in the
Series/Index.
Parameters
----------
to_strip : str or unicode
side : {'left', 'right', 'both'}, default 'both'
Returns
-------
stripped : Series/Index of objects
"""
if side == 'both':
f = lambda x: x.strip(to_strip)
elif side == 'left':
f = lambda x: x.lstrip(to_strip)
elif side == 'right':
f = lambda x: x.rstrip(to_strip)
else: # pragma: no cover
raise ValueError('Invalid side')
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_wrap(arr, width, **kwargs):
r"""
Wrap long strings in the Series/Index to be formatted in
paragraphs with length less than a given width.
This method has the same keyword parameters and defaults as
:class:`textwrap.TextWrapper`.
Parameters
----------
width : int
Maximum line-width
expand_tabs : bool, optional
If true, tab characters will be expanded to spaces (default: True)
replace_whitespace : bool, optional
If true, each whitespace character (as defined by string.whitespace)
remaining after tab expansion will be replaced by a single space
(default: True)
drop_whitespace : bool, optional
If true, whitespace that, after wrapping, happens to end up at the
beginning or end of a line is dropped (default: True)
break_long_words : bool, optional
If true, then words longer than width will be broken in order to ensure
that no lines are longer than width. If it is false, long words will
not be broken, and some lines may be longer than width. (default: True)
break_on_hyphens : bool, optional
If true, wrapping will occur preferably on whitespace and right after
hyphens in compound words, as it is customary in English. If false,
only whitespaces will be considered as potentially good places for line
breaks, but you need to set break_long_words to false if you want truly
insecable words. (default: True)
Returns
-------
wrapped : Series/Index of objects
Notes
-----
Internally, this method uses a :class:`textwrap.TextWrapper` instance with
default settings. To achieve behavior matching R's stringr library str_wrap
function, use the arguments:
- expand_tabs = False
- replace_whitespace = True
- drop_whitespace = True
- break_long_words = False
- break_on_hyphens = False
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['line to be wrapped', 'another line to be wrapped'])
>>> s.str.wrap(12)
0 line to be\nwrapped
1 another line\nto be\nwrapped
"""
kwargs['width'] = width
tw = textwrap.TextWrapper(**kwargs)
return _na_map(lambda s: '\n'.join(tw.wrap(s)), arr)
def str_translate(arr, table, deletechars=None):
"""
Map all characters in the string through the given mapping table.
Equivalent to standard :meth:`str.translate`. Note that the optional
argument deletechars is only valid if you are using python 2. For python 3,
character deletion should be specified via the table argument.
Parameters
----------
table : dict (python 3), str or None (python 2)
In python 3, table is a mapping of Unicode ordinals to Unicode
ordinals, strings, or None. Unmapped characters are left untouched.
Characters mapped to None are deleted. :meth:`str.maketrans` is a
helper function for making translation tables.
In python 2, table is either a string of length 256 or None. If the
table argument is None, no translation is applied and the operation
simply removes the characters in deletechars. :func:`string.maketrans`
is a helper function for making translation tables.
deletechars : str, optional (python 2)
A string of characters to delete. This argument is only valid
in python 2.
Returns
-------
translated : Series/Index of objects
"""
if deletechars is None:
f = lambda x: x.translate(table)
else:
if compat.PY3:
raise ValueError("deletechars is not a valid argument for "
"str.translate in python 3. You should simply "
"specify character deletions in the table "
"argument")
f = lambda x: x.translate(table, deletechars)
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_get(arr, i):
"""
Extract element from each component at specified position.
Extract element from lists, tuples, or strings in each element in the
Series/Index.
Parameters
----------
i : int
Position of element to extract.
Returns
-------
items : Series/Index of objects
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(["String",
(1, 2, 3),
["a", "b", "c"],
123, -456,
{1:"Hello", "2":"World"}])
>>> s
0 String
1 (1, 2, 3)
2 [a, b, c]
3 123
4 -456
5 {1: 'Hello', '2': 'World'}
dtype: object
>>> s.str.get(1)
0 t
1 2
2 b
3 NaN
4 NaN
5 Hello
dtype: object
>>> s.str.get(-1)
0 g
1 3
2 c
3 NaN
4 NaN
5 NaN
dtype: object
"""
def f(x):
if isinstance(x, dict):
return x.get(i)
elif len(x) > i >= -len(x):
return x[i]
return np.nan
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_decode(arr, encoding, errors="strict"):
"""
Decode character string in the Series/Index using indicated encoding.
Equivalent to :meth:`str.decode` in python2 and :meth:`bytes.decode` in
python3.
Parameters
----------
encoding : str
errors : str, optional
Returns
-------
decoded : Series/Index of objects
"""
if encoding in _cpython_optimized_decoders:
# CPython optimized implementation
f = lambda x: x.decode(encoding, errors)
else:
decoder = codecs.getdecoder(encoding)
f = lambda x: decoder(x, errors)[0]
return _na_map(f, arr)
def str_encode(arr, encoding, errors="strict"):
"""
Encode character string in the Series/Index using indicated encoding.
Equivalent to :meth:`str.encode`.
Parameters
----------
encoding : str
errors : str, optional
Returns
-------
encoded : Series/Index of objects
"""
if encoding in _cpython_optimized_encoders:
# CPython optimized implementation
f = lambda x: x.encode(encoding, errors)
else:
encoder = codecs.getencoder(encoding)
f = lambda x: encoder(x, errors)[0]
return _na_map(f, arr)
def _noarg_wrapper(f, docstring=None, **kargs):
def wrapper(self):
result = _na_map(f, self._parent, **kargs)
return self._wrap_result(result)
wrapper.__name__ = f.__name__
if docstring is not None:
wrapper.__doc__ = docstring
else:
raise ValueError('Provide docstring')
return wrapper
def _pat_wrapper(f, flags=False, na=False, **kwargs):
def wrapper1(self, pat):
result = f(self._parent, pat)
return self._wrap_result(result)
def wrapper2(self, pat, flags=0, **kwargs):
result = f(self._parent, pat, flags=flags, **kwargs)
return self._wrap_result(result)
def wrapper3(self, pat, na=np.nan):
result = f(self._parent, pat, na=na)
return self._wrap_result(result)
wrapper = wrapper3 if na else wrapper2 if flags else wrapper1
wrapper.__name__ = f.__name__
if f.__doc__:
wrapper.__doc__ = f.__doc__
return wrapper
def copy(source):
"Copy a docstring from another source function (if present)"
def do_copy(target):
if source.__doc__:
target.__doc__ = source.__doc__
return target
return do_copy
class StringMethods(NoNewAttributesMixin):
"""
Vectorized string functions for Series and Index. NAs stay NA unless
handled otherwise by a particular method. Patterned after Python's string
methods, with some inspiration from R's stringr package.
Examples
--------
>>> s.str.split('_')
>>> s.str.replace('_', '')
"""
def __init__(self, data):
self._validate(data)
self._is_categorical = is_categorical_dtype(data)
# .values.categories works for both Series/Index
self._parent = data.values.categories if self._is_categorical else data
# save orig to blow up categoricals to the right type
self._orig = data
self._freeze()
@staticmethod
def _validate(data):
from pandas.core.index import Index
if (isinstance(data, ABCSeries) and
not ((is_categorical_dtype(data.dtype) and
is_object_dtype(data.values.categories)) or
(is_object_dtype(data.dtype)))):
# it's neither a string series not a categorical series with
# strings inside the categories.
# this really should exclude all series with any non-string values
# (instead of test for object dtype), but that isn't practical for
# performance reasons until we have a str dtype (GH 9343)
raise AttributeError("Can only use .str accessor with string "
"values, which use np.object_ dtype in "
"pandas")
elif isinstance(data, Index):
# can't use ABCIndex to exclude non-str
# see src/inference.pyx which can contain string values
allowed_types = ('string', 'unicode', 'mixed', 'mixed-integer')
if is_categorical_dtype(data.dtype):
inf_type = data.categories.inferred_type
else:
inf_type = data.inferred_type
if inf_type not in allowed_types:
message = ("Can only use .str accessor with string values "
"(i.e. inferred_type is 'string', 'unicode' or "
"'mixed')")
raise AttributeError(message)
if data.nlevels > 1:
message = ("Can only use .str accessor with Index, not "
"MultiIndex")
raise AttributeError(message)
def __getitem__(self, key):
if isinstance(key, slice):
return self.slice(start=key.start, stop=key.stop, step=key.step)
else:
return self.get(key)
def __iter__(self):
i = 0
g = self.get(i)
while g.notna().any():
yield g
i += 1
g = self.get(i)
def _wrap_result(self, result, use_codes=True,
name=None, expand=None):
from pandas.core.index import Index, MultiIndex
# for category, we do the stuff on the categories, so blow it up
# to the full series again
# But for some operations, we have to do the stuff on the full values,
# so make it possible to skip this step as the method already did this
# before the transformation...
if use_codes and self._is_categorical:
result = take_1d(result, self._orig.cat.codes)
if not hasattr(result, 'ndim') or not hasattr(result, 'dtype'):
return result
assert result.ndim < 3
if expand is None:
# infer from ndim if expand is not specified
expand = False if result.ndim == 1 else True
elif expand is True and not isinstance(self._orig, Index):
# required when expand=True is explicitly specified
# not needed when inferred
def cons_row(x):
if is_list_like(x):
return x
else:
return [x]
result = [cons_row(x) for x in result]
if result:
# propagate nan values to match longest sequence (GH 18450)
max_len = max(len(x) for x in result)
result = [x * max_len if len(x) == 0 or x[0] is np.nan
else x for x in result]
if not isinstance(expand, bool):
raise ValueError("expand must be True or False")
if expand is False:
# if expand is False, result should have the same name
# as the original otherwise specified
if name is None:
name = getattr(result, 'name', None)
if name is None:
# do not use logical or, _orig may be a DataFrame
# which has "name" column
name = self._orig.name
# Wait until we are sure result is a Series or Index before
# checking attributes (GH 12180)
if isinstance(self._orig, Index):
# if result is a boolean np.array, return the np.array
# instead of wrapping it into a boolean Index (GH 8875)
if is_bool_dtype(result):
return result
if expand:
result = list(result)
out = MultiIndex.from_tuples(result, names=name)
if out.nlevels == 1:
# We had all tuples of length-one, which are
# better represented as a regular Index.
out = out.get_level_values(0)
return out
else:
return Index(result, name=name)
else:
index = self._orig.index
if expand:
cons = self._orig._constructor_expanddim
return cons(result, columns=name, index=index)
else:
# Must be a Series
cons = self._orig._constructor
return cons(result, name=name, index=index)
def _get_series_list(self, others, ignore_index=False):
"""
Auxiliary function for :meth:`str.cat`. Turn potentially mixed input
into a list of Series (elements without an index must match the length
of the calling Series/Index).
Parameters
----------
others : Series, Index, DataFrame, np.ndarray, list-like or list-like
of objects that are Series, Index or np.ndarray (1-dim)
ignore_index : boolean, default False
Determines whether to forcefully align others with index of caller
Returns
-------
tuple : (others transformed into list of Series,
boolean whether FutureWarning should be raised)
"""
# Once str.cat defaults to alignment, this function can be simplified;
# will not need `ignore_index` and the second boolean output anymore
from pandas import Index, Series, DataFrame
# self._orig is either Series or Index
idx = self._orig if isinstance(self._orig, Index) else self._orig.index
err_msg = ('others must be Series, Index, DataFrame, np.ndarrary or '
'list-like (either containing only strings or containing '
'only objects of type Series/Index/list-like/np.ndarray)')
# Generally speaking, all objects without an index inherit the index
# `idx` of the calling Series/Index - i.e. must have matching length.
# Objects with an index (i.e. Series/Index/DataFrame) keep their own
# index, *unless* ignore_index is set to True.
if isinstance(others, Series):
warn = not others.index.equals(idx)
# only reconstruct Series when absolutely necessary
los = [Series(others.values, index=idx)
if ignore_index and warn else others]
return (los, warn)
elif isinstance(others, Index):
warn = not others.equals(idx)
los = [Series(others.values,
index=(idx if ignore_index else others))]
return (los, warn)
elif isinstance(others, DataFrame):
warn = not others.index.equals(idx)
if ignore_index and warn:
# without copy, this could change "others"
# that was passed to str.cat
others = others.copy()
others.index = idx
return ([others[x] for x in others], warn)
elif isinstance(others, np.ndarray) and others.ndim == 2:
others = DataFrame(others, index=idx)
return ([others[x] for x in others], False)
elif is_list_like(others):
others = list(others) # ensure iterators do not get read twice etc
# in case of list-like `others`, all elements must be
# either one-dimensional list-likes or scalars
if all(is_list_like(x) for x in others):
los = []
join_warn = False
depr_warn = False
# iterate through list and append list of series for each
# element (which we check to be one-dimensional and non-nested)
while others:
nxt = others.pop(0) # nxt is guaranteed list-like by above
# GH 21950 - DeprecationWarning
# only allowing Series/Index/np.ndarray[1-dim] will greatly
# simply this function post-deprecation.
if not (isinstance(nxt, (Series, Index)) or
(isinstance(nxt, np.ndarray) and nxt.ndim == 1)):
depr_warn = True
if not isinstance(nxt, (DataFrame, Series,
Index, np.ndarray)):
# safety for non-persistent list-likes (e.g. iterators)
# do not map indexed/typed objects; info needed below
nxt = list(nxt)
# known types for which we can avoid deep inspection
no_deep = ((isinstance(nxt, np.ndarray) and nxt.ndim == 1)
or isinstance(nxt, (Series, Index)))
# nested list-likes are forbidden:
# -> elements of nxt must not be list-like
is_legal = ((no_deep and nxt.dtype == object)
or all(not is_list_like(x) for x in nxt))
# DataFrame is false positive of is_legal
# because "x in df" returns column names
if not is_legal or isinstance(nxt, DataFrame):
raise TypeError(err_msg)
nxt, wnx = self._get_series_list(nxt,
ignore_index=ignore_index)
los = los + nxt
join_warn = join_warn or wnx
if depr_warn:
warnings.warn('list-likes other than Series, Index, or '
'np.ndarray WITHIN another list-like are '
'deprecated and will be removed in a future '
'version.', FutureWarning, stacklevel=3)
return (los, join_warn)
elif all(not is_list_like(x) for x in others):
return ([Series(others, index=idx)], False)
raise TypeError(err_msg)
def cat(self, others=None, sep=None, na_rep=None, join=None):
"""
Concatenate strings in the Series/Index with given separator.
If `others` is specified, this function concatenates the Series/Index
and elements of `others` element-wise.
If `others` is not passed, then all values in the Series/Index are
concatenated into a single string with a given `sep`.
Parameters
----------
others : Series, Index, DataFrame, np.ndarrary or list-like
Series, Index, DataFrame, np.ndarray (one- or two-dimensional) and
other list-likes of strings must have the same length as the
calling Series/Index, with the exception of indexed objects (i.e.
Series/Index/DataFrame) if `join` is not None.
If others is a list-like that contains a combination of Series,
Index or np.ndarray (1-dim), then all elements will be unpacked and
must satisfy the above criteria individually.
If others is None, the method returns the concatenation of all
strings in the calling Series/Index.
sep : string or None, default None
If None, concatenates without any separator.
na_rep : string or None, default None
Representation that is inserted for all missing values:
- If `na_rep` is None, and `others` is None, missing values in the
Series/Index are omitted from the result.
- If `na_rep` is None, and `others` is not None, a row containing a
missing value in any of the columns (before concatenation) will
have a missing value in the result.
join : {'left', 'right', 'outer', 'inner'}, default None
Determines the join-style between the calling Series/Index and any
Series/Index/DataFrame in `others` (objects without an index need
to match the length of the calling Series/Index). If None,
alignment is disabled, but this option will be removed in a future
version of pandas and replaced with a default of `'left'`. To
disable alignment, use `.values` on any Series/Index/DataFrame in
`others`.
.. versionadded:: 0.23.0
Returns
-------
concat : str or Series/Index of objects
If `others` is None, `str` is returned, otherwise a `Series/Index`
(same type as caller) of objects is returned.
See Also
--------
split : Split each string in the Series/Index
join : Join lists contained as elements in the Series/Index
Examples
--------
When not passing `others`, all values are concatenated into a single
string:
>>> s = pd.Series(['a', 'b', np.nan, 'd'])
>>> s.str.cat(sep=' ')
'a b d'
By default, NA values in the Series are ignored. Using `na_rep`, they
can be given a representation:
>>> s.str.cat(sep=' ', na_rep='?')
'a b ? d'
If `others` is specified, corresponding values are concatenated with
the separator. Result will be a Series of strings.
>>> s.str.cat(['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'], sep=',')
0 a,A
1 b,B
2 NaN
3 d,D
dtype: object
Missing values will remain missing in the result, but can again be
represented using `na_rep`
>>> s.str.cat(['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'], sep=',', na_rep='-')
0 a,A
1 b,B
2 -,C
3 d,D
dtype: object
If `sep` is not specified, the values are concatenated without
separation.
>>> s.str.cat(['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'], na_rep='-')
0 aA
1 bB
2 -C
3 dD
dtype: object
Series with different indexes can be aligned before concatenation. The
`join`-keyword works as in other methods.
>>> t = pd.Series(['d', 'a', 'e', 'c'], index=[3, 0, 4, 2])
>>> s.str.cat(t, join=None, na_rep='-')
0 ad
1 ba
2 -e
3 dc
dtype: object
>>>
>>> s.str.cat(t, join='left', na_rep='-')
0 aa
1 b-
2 -c
3 dd
dtype: object
>>>
>>> s.str.cat(t, join='outer', na_rep='-')
0 aa
1 b-
2 -c
3 dd
4 -e
dtype: object
>>>
>>> s.str.cat(t, join='inner', na_rep='-')
0 aa
2 -c
3 dd
dtype: object
>>>
>>> s.str.cat(t, join='right', na_rep='-')
3 dd
0 aa
4 -e
2 -c
dtype: object
For more examples, see :ref:`here <text.concatenate>`.
"""
from pandas import Index, Series, concat
if isinstance(others, compat.string_types):
raise ValueError("Did you mean to supply a `sep` keyword?")
if isinstance(self._orig, Index):
data = Series(self._orig, index=self._orig)
else: # Series
data = self._orig
# concatenate Series/Index with itself if no "others"
if others is None:
result = str_cat(data, others=others, sep=sep, na_rep=na_rep)
return self._wrap_result(result,
use_codes=(not self._is_categorical))
try:
# turn anything in "others" into lists of Series
others, warn = self._get_series_list(others,
ignore_index=(join is None))
except ValueError: # do not catch TypeError raised by _get_series_list
if join is None:
raise ValueError('All arrays must be same length, except '
'those having an index if `join` is not None')
else:
raise ValueError('If `others` contains arrays or lists (or '
'other list-likes without an index), these '
'must all be of the same length as the '
'calling Series/Index.')
if join is None and warn:
warnings.warn("A future version of pandas will perform index "
"alignment when `others` is a Series/Index/"
"DataFrame (or a list-like containing one). To "
"disable alignment (the behavior before v.0.23) and "
"silence this warning, use `.values` on any Series/"
"Index/DataFrame in `others`. To enable alignment "
"and silence this warning, pass `join='left'|"
"'outer'|'inner'|'right'`. The future default will "
"be `join='left'`.", FutureWarning, stacklevel=2)
# align if required
if join is not None:
# Need to add keys for uniqueness in case of duplicate columns
others = concat(others, axis=1,
join=(join if join == 'inner' else 'outer'),
keys=range(len(others)))
data, others = data.align(others, join=join)
others = [others[x] for x in others] # again list of Series
# str_cat discards index
res = str_cat(data, others=others, sep=sep, na_rep=na_rep)
if isinstance(self._orig, Index):
res = Index(res, name=self._orig.name)
else: # Series
res = Series(res, index=data.index, name=self._orig.name)
return res
_shared_docs['str_split'] = ("""
Split strings around given separator/delimiter.
Splits the string in the Series/Index from the %(side)s,
at the specified delimiter string. Equivalent to :meth:`str.%(method)s`.
Parameters
----------
pat : str, optional
String or regular expression to split on.
If not specified, split on whitespace.
n : int, default -1 (all)
Limit number of splits in output.
``None``, 0 and -1 will be interpreted as return all splits.
expand : bool, default False
Expand the splitted strings into separate columns.
* If ``True``, return DataFrame/MultiIndex expanding dimensionality.
* If ``False``, return Series/Index, containing lists of strings.
Returns
-------
Series, Index, DataFrame or MultiIndex
Type matches caller unless ``expand=True`` (see Notes).
See Also
--------
Series.str.split : Split strings around given separator/delimiter.
Series.str.rsplit : Splits string around given separator/delimiter,
starting from the right.
Series.str.join : Join lists contained as elements in the Series/Index
with passed delimiter.
str.split : Standard library version for split.
str.rsplit : Standard library version for rsplit.
Notes
-----
The handling of the `n` keyword depends on the number of found splits:
- If found splits > `n`, make first `n` splits only
- If found splits <= `n`, make all splits
- If for a certain row the number of found splits < `n`,
append `None` for padding up to `n` if ``expand=True``
If using ``expand=True``, Series and Index callers return DataFrame and
MultiIndex objects, respectively.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(["this is a regular sentence",
"https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html", np.nan])
In the default setting, the string is split by whitespace.
>>> s.str.split()
0 [this, is, a, regular, sentence]
1 [https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html]
2 NaN
dtype: object
Without the `n` parameter, the outputs of `rsplit` and `split`
are identical.
>>> s.str.rsplit()
0 [this, is, a, regular, sentence]
1 [https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html]
2 NaN
dtype: object
The `n` parameter can be used to limit the number of splits on the
delimiter. The outputs of `split` and `rsplit` are different.
>>> s.str.split(n=2)
0 [this, is, a regular sentence]
1 [https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html]
2 NaN
dtype: object
>>> s.str.rsplit(n=2)
0 [this is a, regular, sentence]
1 [https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html]
2 NaN
dtype: object
The `pat` parameter can be used to split by other characters.
>>> s.str.split(pat = "/")
0 [this is a regular sentence]
1 [https:, , docs.python.org, 3, tutorial, index...
2 NaN
dtype: object
When using ``expand=True``, the split elements will expand out into
separate columns. If NaN is present, it is propagated throughout
the columns during the split.
>>> s.str.split(expand=True)
0 1 2 3
0 this is a regular
1 https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/index.html None None None
2 NaN NaN NaN NaN \
4
0 sentence
1 None
2 NaN
For slightly more complex use cases like splitting the html document name
from a url, a combination of parameter settings can be used.
>>> s.str.rsplit("/", n=1, expand=True)
0 1
0 this is a regular sentence None
1 https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial index.html
2 NaN NaN
""")
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_split'] % {
'side': 'beginning',
'method': 'split'})
def split(self, pat=None, n=-1, expand=False):
result = str_split(self._parent, pat, n=n)
return self._wrap_result(result, expand=expand)
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_split'] % {
'side': 'end',
'method': 'rsplit'})
def rsplit(self, pat=None, n=-1, expand=False):
result = str_rsplit(self._parent, pat, n=n)
return self._wrap_result(result, expand=expand)
_shared_docs['str_partition'] = ("""
Split the string at the %(side)s occurrence of `sep`.
This method splits the string at the %(side)s occurrence of `sep`,
and returns 3 elements containing the part before the separator,
the separator itself, and the part after the separator.
If the separator is not found, return %(return)s.
Parameters
----------
pat : str, default whitespace
String to split on.
expand : bool, default True
If True, return DataFrame/MultiIndex expanding dimensionality.
If False, return Series/Index.
Returns
-------
DataFrame/MultiIndex or Series/Index of objects
See Also
--------
%(also)s
Series.str.split : Split strings around given separators.
str.partition : Standard library version.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['Linda van der Berg', 'George Pitt-Rivers'])
>>> s
0 Linda van der Berg
1 George Pitt-Rivers
dtype: object
>>> s.str.partition()
0 1 2
0 Linda van der Berg
1 George Pitt-Rivers
To partition by the last space instead of the first one:
>>> s.str.rpartition()
0 1 2
0 Linda van der Berg
1 George Pitt-Rivers
To partition by something different than a space:
>>> s.str.partition('-')
0 1 2
0 Linda van der Berg
1 George Pitt - Rivers
To return a Series containining tuples instead of a DataFrame:
>>> s.str.partition('-', expand=False)
0 (Linda van der Berg, , )
1 (George Pitt, -, Rivers)
dtype: object
Also available on indices:
>>> idx = pd.Index(['X 123', 'Y 999'])
>>> idx
Index(['X 123', 'Y 999'], dtype='object')
Which will create a MultiIndex:
>>> idx.str.partition()
MultiIndex(levels=[['X', 'Y'], [' '], ['123', '999']],
labels=[[0, 1], [0, 0], [0, 1]])
Or an index with tuples with ``expand=False``:
>>> idx.str.partition(expand=False)
Index([('X', ' ', '123'), ('Y', ' ', '999')], dtype='object')
""")
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_partition'] % {
'side': 'first',
'return': '3 elements containing the string itself, followed by two '
'empty strings',
'also': 'rpartition : Split the string at the last occurrence of `sep`'
})
def partition(self, pat=' ', expand=True):
f = lambda x: x.partition(pat)
result = _na_map(f, self._parent)
return self._wrap_result(result, expand=expand)
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_partition'] % {
'side': 'last',
'return': '3 elements containing two empty strings, followed by the '
'string itself',
'also': 'partition : Split the string at the first occurrence of `sep`'
})
def rpartition(self, pat=' ', expand=True):
f = lambda x: x.rpartition(pat)
result = _na_map(f, self._parent)
return self._wrap_result(result, expand=expand)
@copy(str_get)
def get(self, i):
result = str_get(self._parent, i)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_join)
def join(self, sep):
result = str_join(self._parent, sep)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_contains)
def contains(self, pat, case=True, flags=0, na=np.nan, regex=True):
result = str_contains(self._parent, pat, case=case, flags=flags, na=na,
regex=regex)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_match)
def match(self, pat, case=True, flags=0, na=np.nan):
result = str_match(self._parent, pat, case=case, flags=flags, na=na)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_replace)
def replace(self, pat, repl, n=-1, case=None, flags=0, regex=True):
result = str_replace(self._parent, pat, repl, n=n, case=case,
flags=flags, regex=regex)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_repeat)
def repeat(self, repeats):
result = str_repeat(self._parent, repeats)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_pad)
def pad(self, width, side='left', fillchar=' '):
result = str_pad(self._parent, width, side=side, fillchar=fillchar)
return self._wrap_result(result)
_shared_docs['str_pad'] = ("""
Filling %(side)s side of strings in the Series/Index with an
additional character. Equivalent to :meth:`str.%(method)s`.
Parameters
----------
width : int
Minimum width of resulting string; additional characters will be filled
with ``fillchar``
fillchar : str
Additional character for filling, default is whitespace
Returns
-------
filled : Series/Index of objects
""")
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_pad'] % dict(side='left and right',
method='center'))
def center(self, width, fillchar=' '):
return self.pad(width, side='both', fillchar=fillchar)
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_pad'] % dict(side='right', method='ljust'))
def ljust(self, width, fillchar=' '):
return self.pad(width, side='right', fillchar=fillchar)
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_pad'] % dict(side='left', method='rjust'))
def rjust(self, width, fillchar=' '):
return self.pad(width, side='left', fillchar=fillchar)
def zfill(self, width):
"""
Pad strings in the Series/Index by prepending '0' characters.
Strings in the Series/Index are padded with '0' characters on the
left of the string to reach a total string length `width`. Strings
in the Series/Index with length greater or equal to `width` are
unchanged.
Parameters
----------
width : int
Minimum length of resulting string; strings with length less
than `width` be prepended with '0' characters.
Returns
-------
Series/Index of objects
See Also
--------
Series.str.rjust: Fills the left side of strings with an arbitrary
character.
Series.str.ljust: Fills the right side of strings with an arbitrary
character.
Series.str.pad: Fills the specified sides of strings with an arbitrary
character.
Series.str.center: Fills boths sides of strings with an arbitrary
character.
Notes
-----
Differs from :meth:`str.zfill` which has special handling
for '+'/'-' in the string.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['-1', '1', '1000', 10, np.nan])
>>> s
0 -1
1 1
2 1000
3 10
4 NaN
dtype: object
Note that ``10`` and ``NaN`` are not strings, therefore they are
converted to ``NaN``. The minus sign in ``'-1'`` is treated as a
regular character and the zero is added to the left of it
(:meth:`str.zfill` would have moved it to the left). ``1000``
remains unchanged as it is longer than `width`.
>>> s.str.zfill(3)
0 0-1
1 001
2 1000
3 NaN
4 NaN
dtype: object
"""
result = str_pad(self._parent, width, side='left', fillchar='0')
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_slice)
def slice(self, start=None, stop=None, step=None):
result = str_slice(self._parent, start, stop, step)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_slice_replace)
def slice_replace(self, start=None, stop=None, repl=None):
result = str_slice_replace(self._parent, start, stop, repl)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_decode)
def decode(self, encoding, errors="strict"):
result = str_decode(self._parent, encoding, errors)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_encode)
def encode(self, encoding, errors="strict"):
result = str_encode(self._parent, encoding, errors)
return self._wrap_result(result)
_shared_docs['str_strip'] = (r"""
Remove leading and trailing characters.
Strip whitespaces (including newlines) or a set of specified characters
from each string in the Series/Index from %(side)s.
Equivalent to :meth:`str.%(method)s`.
Parameters
----------
to_strip : str or None, default None.
Specifying the set of characters to be removed.
All combinations of this set of characters will be stripped.
If None then whitespaces are removed.
Returns
-------
Series/Index of objects
See Also
--------
Series.str.strip : Remove leading and trailing characters in Series/Index
Series.str.lstrip : Remove leading characters in Series/Index
Series.str.rstrip : Remove trailing characters in Series/Index
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['1. Ant. ', '2. Bee!\n', '3. Cat?\t', np.nan])
>>> s
0 1. Ant.
1 2. Bee!\n
2 3. Cat?\t
3 NaN
dtype: object
>>> s.str.strip()
0 1. Ant.
1 2. Bee!
2 3. Cat?
3 NaN
dtype: object
>>> s.str.lstrip('123.')
0 Ant.
1 Bee!\n
2 Cat?\t
3 NaN
dtype: object
>>> s.str.rstrip('.!? \n\t')
0 1. Ant
1 2. Bee
2 3. Cat
3 NaN
dtype: object
>>> s.str.strip('123.!? \n\t')
0 Ant
1 Bee
2 Cat
3 NaN
dtype: object
""")
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_strip'] % dict(side='left and right sides',
method='strip'))
def strip(self, to_strip=None):
result = str_strip(self._parent, to_strip, side='both')
return self._wrap_result(result)
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_strip'] % dict(side='left side',
method='lstrip'))
def lstrip(self, to_strip=None):
result = str_strip(self._parent, to_strip, side='left')
return self._wrap_result(result)
@Appender(_shared_docs['str_strip'] % dict(side='right side',
method='rstrip'))
def rstrip(self, to_strip=None):
result = str_strip(self._parent, to_strip, side='right')
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_wrap)
def wrap(self, width, **kwargs):
result = str_wrap(self._parent, width, **kwargs)
return self._wrap_result(result)
@copy(str_get_dummies)
def get_dummies(self, sep='|'):
# we need to cast to Series of strings as only that has all
# methods available for making the dummies...
data = self._orig.astype(str) if self._is_categorical else self._parent
result, name = str_get_dummies(data, sep)
return self._wrap_result(result, use_codes=(not self._is_categorical),
name=name, expand=True)
@copy(str_translate)
def translate(self, table, deletechars=None):
result = str_translate(self._parent, table, deletechars)
return self._wrap_result(result)
count = _pat_wrapper(str_count, flags=True)
startswith = _pat_wrapper(str_startswith, na=True)
endswith = _pat_wrapper(str_endswith, na=True)
findall = _pat_wrapper(str_findall, flags=True)
@copy(str_extract)
def extract(self, pat, flags=0, expand=True):
return str_extract(self, pat, flags=flags, expand=expand)
@copy(str_extractall)
def extractall(self, pat, flags=0):
return str_extractall(self._orig, pat, flags=flags)
_shared_docs['find'] = ("""
Return %(side)s indexes in each strings in the Series/Index
where the substring is fully contained between [start:end].
Return -1 on failure. Equivalent to standard :meth:`str.%(method)s`.
Parameters
----------
sub : str
Substring being searched
start : int
Left edge index
end : int
Right edge index
Returns
-------
found : Series/Index of integer values
See Also
--------
%(also)s
""")
@Appender(_shared_docs['find'] %
dict(side='lowest', method='find',
also='rfind : Return highest indexes in each strings'))
def find(self, sub, start=0, end=None):
result = str_find(self._parent, sub, start=start, end=end, side='left')
return self._wrap_result(result)
@Appender(_shared_docs['find'] %
dict(side='highest', method='rfind',
also='find : Return lowest indexes in each strings'))
def rfind(self, sub, start=0, end=None):
result = str_find(self._parent, sub,
start=start, end=end, side='right')
return self._wrap_result(result)
def normalize(self, form):
"""Return the Unicode normal form for the strings in the Series/Index.
For more information on the forms, see the
:func:`unicodedata.normalize`.
Parameters
----------
form : {'NFC', 'NFKC', 'NFD', 'NFKD'}
Unicode form
Returns
-------
normalized : Series/Index of objects
"""
import unicodedata
f = lambda x: unicodedata.normalize(form, compat.u_safe(x))
result = _na_map(f, self._parent)
return self._wrap_result(result)
_shared_docs['index'] = ("""
Return %(side)s indexes in each strings where the substring is
fully contained between [start:end]. This is the same as
``str.%(similar)s`` except instead of returning -1, it raises a ValueError
when the substring is not found. Equivalent to standard ``str.%(method)s``.
Parameters
----------
sub : str
Substring being searched
start : int
Left edge index
end : int
Right edge index
Returns
-------
found : Series/Index of objects
See Also
--------
%(also)s
""")
@Appender(_shared_docs['index'] %
dict(side='lowest', similar='find', method='index',
also='rindex : Return highest indexes in each strings'))
def index(self, sub, start=0, end=None):
result = str_index(self._parent, sub,
start=start, end=end, side='left')
return self._wrap_result(result)
@Appender(_shared_docs['index'] %
dict(side='highest', similar='rfind', method='rindex',
also='index : Return lowest indexes in each strings'))
def rindex(self, sub, start=0, end=None):
result = str_index(self._parent, sub,
start=start, end=end, side='right')
return self._wrap_result(result)
_shared_docs['len'] = ("""
Computes the length of each element in the Series/Index. The element may be
a sequence (such as a string, tuple or list) or a collection
(such as a dictionary).
Returns
-------
Series or Index of int
A Series or Index of integer values indicating the length of each
element in the Series or Index.
See Also
--------
str.len : Python built-in function returning the length of an object.
Series.size : Returns the length of the Series.
Examples
--------
Returns the length (number of characters) in a string. Returns the
number of entries for dictionaries, lists or tuples.
>>> s = pd.Series(['dog',
... '',
... 5,
... {'foo' : 'bar'},
... [2, 3, 5, 7],
... ('one', 'two', 'three')])
>>> s
0 dog
1
2 5
3 {'foo': 'bar'}
4 [2, 3, 5, 7]
5 (one, two, three)
dtype: object
>>> s.str.len()
0 3.0
1 0.0
2 NaN
3 1.0
4 4.0
5 3.0
dtype: float64
""")
len = _noarg_wrapper(len, docstring=_shared_docs['len'], dtype=int)
_shared_docs['casemethods'] = ("""
Convert strings in the Series/Index to %(type)s.
Equivalent to :meth:`str.%(method)s`.
Returns
-------
Series/Index of objects
See Also
--------
Series.str.lower : Converts all characters to lowercase.
Series.str.upper : Converts all characters to uppercase.
Series.str.title : Converts first character of each word to uppercase and
remaining to lowercase.
Series.str.capitalize : Converts first character to uppercase and
remaining to lowercase.
Series.str.swapcase : Converts uppercase to lowercase and lowercase to
uppercase.
Examples
--------
>>> s = pd.Series(['lower', 'CAPITALS', 'this is a sentence', 'SwApCaSe'])
>>> s
0 lower
1 CAPITALS
2 this is a sentence
3 SwApCaSe
dtype: object
>>> s.str.lower()
0 lower
1 capitals
2 this is a sentence
3 swapcase
dtype: object
>>> s.str.upper()
0 LOWER
1 CAPITALS
2 THIS IS A SENTENCE
3 SWAPCASE
dtype: object
>>> s.str.title()
0 Lower
1 Capitals
2 This Is A Sentence
3 Swapcase
dtype: object
>>> s.str.capitalize()
0 Lower
1 Capitals
2 This is a sentence
3 Swapcase
dtype: object
>>> s.str.swapcase()
0 LOWER
1 capitals
2 THIS IS A SENTENCE
3 sWaPcAsE
dtype: object
""")
_shared_docs['lower'] = dict(type='lowercase', method='lower')
_shared_docs['upper'] = dict(type='uppercase', method='upper')
_shared_docs['title'] = dict(type='titlecase', method='title')
_shared_docs['capitalize'] = dict(type='be capitalized',
method='capitalize')
_shared_docs['swapcase'] = dict(type='be swapcased', method='swapcase')
lower = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.lower(),
docstring=_shared_docs['casemethods'] %
_shared_docs['lower'])
upper = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.upper(),
docstring=_shared_docs['casemethods'] %
_shared_docs['upper'])
title = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.title(),
docstring=_shared_docs['casemethods'] %
_shared_docs['title'])
capitalize = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.capitalize(),
docstring=_shared_docs['casemethods'] %
_shared_docs['capitalize'])
swapcase = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.swapcase(),
docstring=_shared_docs['casemethods'] %
_shared_docs['swapcase'])
_shared_docs['ismethods'] = ("""
Check whether all characters in each string are %(type)s.
This is equivalent to running the Python string method
:meth:`str.%(method)s` for each element of the Series/Index. If a string
has zero characters, ``False`` is returned for that check.
Returns
-------
Series or Index of bool
Series or Index of boolean values with the same length as the original
Series/Index.
See Also
--------
Series.str.isalpha : Check whether all characters are alphabetic.
Series.str.isnumeric : Check whether all characters are numeric.
Series.str.isalnum : Check whether all characters are alphanumeric.
Series.str.isdigit : Check whether all characters are digits.
Series.str.isdecimal : Check whether all characters are decimal.
Series.str.isspace : Check whether all characters are whitespace.
Series.str.islower : Check whether all characters are lowercase.
Series.str.isupper : Check whether all characters are uppercase.
Series.str.istitle : Check whether all characters are titlecase.
Examples
--------
**Checks for Alphabetic and Numeric Characters**
>>> s1 = pd.Series(['one', 'one1', '1', ''])
>>> s1.str.isalpha()
0 True
1 False
2 False
3 False
dtype: bool
>>> s1.str.isnumeric()
0 False
1 False
2 True
3 False
dtype: bool
>>> s1.str.isalnum()
0 True
1 True
2 True
3 False
dtype: bool
Note that checks against characters mixed with any additional punctuation
or whitespace will evaluate to false for an alphanumeric check.
>>> s2 = pd.Series(['A B', '1.5', '3,000'])
>>> s2.str.isalnum()
0 False
1 False
2 False
dtype: bool
**More Detailed Checks for Numeric Characters**
There are several different but overlapping sets of numeric characters that
can be checked for.
>>> s3 = pd.Series(['23', '³', '⅕', ''])
The ``s3.str.isdecimal`` method checks for characters used to form numbers
in base 10.
>>> s3.str.isdecimal()
0 True
1 False
2 False
3 False
dtype: bool
The ``s.str.isdigit`` method is the same as ``s3.str.isdecimal`` but also
includes special digits, like superscripted and subscripted digits in
unicode.
>>> s3.str.isdigit()
0 True
1 True
2 False
3 False
dtype: bool
The ``s.str.isnumeric`` method is the same as ``s3.str.isdigit`` but also
includes other characters that can represent quantities such as unicode
fractions.
>>> s3.str.isnumeric()
0 True
1 True
2 True
3 False
dtype: bool
**Checks for Whitespace**
>>> s4 = pd.Series([' ', '\\t\\r\\n ', ''])
>>> s4.str.isspace()
0 True
1 True
2 False
dtype: bool
**Checks for Character Case**
>>> s5 = pd.Series(['leopard', 'Golden Eagle', 'SNAKE', ''])
>>> s5.str.islower()
0 True
1 False
2 False
3 False
dtype: bool
>>> s5.str.isupper()
0 False
1 False
2 True
3 False
dtype: bool
The ``s5.str.istitle`` method checks for whether all words are in title
case (whether only the first letter of each word is capitalized). Words are
assumed to be as any sequence of non-numeric characters seperated by
whitespace characters.
>>> s5.str.istitle()
0 False
1 True
2 False
3 False
dtype: bool
""")
_shared_docs['isalnum'] = dict(type='alphanumeric', method='isalnum')
_shared_docs['isalpha'] = dict(type='alphabetic', method='isalpha')
_shared_docs['isdigit'] = dict(type='digits', method='isdigit')
_shared_docs['isspace'] = dict(type='whitespace', method='isspace')
_shared_docs['islower'] = dict(type='lowercase', method='islower')
_shared_docs['isupper'] = dict(type='uppercase', method='isupper')
_shared_docs['istitle'] = dict(type='titlecase', method='istitle')
_shared_docs['isnumeric'] = dict(type='numeric', method='isnumeric')
_shared_docs['isdecimal'] = dict(type='decimal', method='isdecimal')
isalnum = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.isalnum(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['isalnum'])
isalpha = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.isalpha(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['isalpha'])
isdigit = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.isdigit(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['isdigit'])
isspace = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.isspace(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['isspace'])
islower = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.islower(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['islower'])
isupper = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.isupper(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['isupper'])
istitle = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: x.istitle(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['istitle'])
isnumeric = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: compat.u_safe(x).isnumeric(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['isnumeric'])
isdecimal = _noarg_wrapper(lambda x: compat.u_safe(x).isdecimal(),
docstring=_shared_docs['ismethods'] %
_shared_docs['isdecimal'])
@classmethod
def _make_accessor(cls, data):
cls._validate(data)
return cls(data)