Permalink
Browse files

reformat all Pod files under docs with podtidy (modified to also remo…

…ve tailing whitespace) except for docs/pdds

git-svn-id: https://svn.parrot.org/parrot/trunk@9346 d31e2699-5ff4-0310-a27c-f18f2fbe73fe
  • Loading branch information...
jhoblitt committed Oct 5, 2005
1 parent 280b750 commit ea0630c1a10673a7d173bf24a85a89d63516d97b
View
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ So, for example:
{ 0, 0, 0, { NULL } }
};
-This is a structure that specifies three options.
+This is a structure that specifies three options.
Some various ways you could give these options on the command line follow:
View
@@ -202,7 +202,7 @@ are added to the bitmap. To check if a character were in the bitmap, you would
need to scan each entry in the string one by one. This is slow (linear time),
and it still wastes space. It turns out that this is actually how characters >
255 are handled. This is a good method for that, but for characters < 256 we
-can make use of some optimization.
+can make use of some optimization.
=item B<Array/Bitfields>
View
@@ -98,13 +98,13 @@ PARROT_PREDEREF_CORE, PARROT_JIT_CORE.
=item C<PARROT_PREDEREF_CORE>
This flag turns on predereferencing. Parrot will transform many offsets in the
-opcode stream to absolute pointers.
+opcode stream to absolute pointers.
=item C<PARROT_JIT_CORE>
This flag turns on just-in-time compilation. Parrot will convert the bytecode
file into native machine code and run it, usually resulting in substantial
-speedup.
+speedup.
=back
View
@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ the GNU GPL, which means you can combine Parrot with GPL'ed code.
Code accepted into the core interpreter must fall under the same terms as
parrot. Library code (for example the ICU library we're using for Unicode) we
link into the interpreter can be covered by other licenses so long as their
-terms don't prohibit this.
+terms don't prohibit this.
=item *
Platform compatibility.
@@ -284,7 +284,7 @@ included the Perl language, the implementation of that language, the community
of open source developers who volunteer to implement and maintain the language,
and the larger community of programmers who use Perl.
-A variety of reasons were given for embarking on this project:
+A variety of reasons were given for embarking on this project:
=over 4
@@ -315,7 +315,7 @@ I<false> on success, and C<localtime> should return the year, not the year -
=item *
It would be nice to write the Perl to Bytecode compiler in Perl, instead of C.
-That would make it much easier for Perl hackers to hack on Perl.
+That would make it much easier for Perl hackers to hack on Perl.
=back
@@ -415,7 +415,7 @@ even short-lived objects that will exist only briefly before dying. The cost of
a reference counting scheme is directly linked to the number of times code
references, or unreferences, objects. A tracing system of one sort or another
(and there are many) has an average-case cost that's based on the number of
-live objects.
+live objects.
There are a number of hidden costs in a reference-counting scheme. Since the
code to manipulate the reference counts I<must> be scattered throughout the
View
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ everything local to that execution path, not just the stack. It is a snapshot
in time (minus global variables). While it is similar to C's C<setjmp> (taking
the continuation)/C<longjmp> (invoking the continuation), C<longjmp>'ing only
works "down" the stack; jumping "up" the stack (ie, back to a frame that has
-returned) is bad. Continuations can work either way.
+returned) is bad. Continuations can work either way.
We can do two important things with continuations:
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ marked COW. If either string A or string B are changed, the system notes it and
only at that point does it make a copy of the string and change it.
If the program never actually changes the string - something that's fairly
-common - the program need never make a copy, saving both memory and time.
+common - the program need never make a copy, saving both memory and time.
=for author
Nicholas Clark <nick@ccl4.org>, as clarified by Leo
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ reclaimed by the related L<"destruction"> operation, as and when necessary.
Garbage Collection is the process of sweeping through all the active objects,
variables, and structures, marking the memory they're using as in use, and all
-other memory is freed up for later reuse.
+other memory is freed up for later reuse.
Garbage Collection and Dead Object Detection are separate in Parrot, since we
generally chew through memory segments faster than we chew through objects.
@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ See also L<"PIR">.
=head2 JAPH
In the Parrot context a JAPH is a small script that prints the string "Just
-another Parrot Hacker\".
+another Parrot Hacker\".
=head2 Packfile
@@ -152,7 +152,7 @@ manipulating the DOD-relevant object flags.
The three object flags consulted during DOD are packed into one 4-bit nibble
per object (one bit is currently unused). Since C<arena-E<gt>dod_flags[]> is
an array of native-sized UINTVALs ("words"), the number of nibbles per array
-entry varies depending on the platform.
+entry varies depending on the platform.
To reference a particular flag in a test, set, or clear operation, we require
both the word containing the object's flags and a bitmask to isolate the flag.
View
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ operators such as addition or subtraction.
The MMD system is straightforward, and currently must be explicitly invoked,
for example by a vtable function. (We may reserve the right to use MMD in all
-circumstances, but currently do not)
+circumstances, but currently do not)
=head2 API
View
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ This generates the "myprog" executable, which runs equivalently to
./parrot -j myprog.pbc
-minus the time required to JIT-compile the bytecode.
+minus the time required to JIT-compile the bytecode.
The "testexec" Makefile target demonstrates this method for a "Hello world"
program.
View
@@ -54,13 +54,13 @@ designated by the first C<INTVAL> by the value in the second C<INTVAL>.
Naturally, operations which act on C<FLOATVAL> registers will use C<FLOATVAL>s
for constants; however, since the first argument is almost always a register
B<number> rather than actual data, even operations on string and PMC registers
-will take an C<INTVAL> as the first argument.
+will take an C<INTVAL> as the first argument.
As in Perl, Parrot ops will return the pointer to the next operation in the
bytecode stream. Although ops will have a predetermined number and size of
arguments, it's cheaper to have the individual ops skip over their arguments
returning the next operation, rather than looking up in a table the number of
-bytes to skip over for a given opcode.
+bytes to skip over for a given opcode.
There will be global and private opcode tables; that is to say, an area of the
bytecode can define a set of custom operations that it will use. These areas
@@ -136,7 +136,7 @@ You can find out more about vtables in F<docs/vtables.pod>.
Parrot provides a programmer-friendly view of strings. The Parrot string
handling subsection handles all the work of memory allocation, expansion, and
so on behind the scenes. It also deals with some of the encoding headaches that
-can plague Unicode-aware languages.
+can plague Unicode-aware languages.
This is done primarily by a similar vtable system to that used by PMCs; each
encoding will specify functions such as the maximum number of bytes to allocate
View
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ docs/parrot.pod - Parrot
Parrot is a common bytecode format and interpreter for dynamic languages; it is
designed to run Perl 6 code efficiently, but is also intended to be
-language-agnostic.
+language-agnostic.
=head2 Documentation
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ inter-routine calling conventions.
This subdirectory contains documentation files that are created from the
corresponding opcode files at build time. These files describe what each opcode
-does and specify what arguments they take.
+does and specify what arguments they take.
=item F<pmc/>
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ The Parrot bytecode format.
=item F<packfile-perl.pod>, F<packfile-c.pod>
-The APIs for accessing packed bytecode files (packfiles) from Perl and C.
+The APIs for accessing packed bytecode files (packfiles) from Perl and C.
=item F<strings.pod>
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ ones. The Parrot team is committed to supporting the following combinations as
Parrot is developed and maintained by the members of the
C<perl6-internals@perl.org> mailing list. The list is archived at:
-L<http://nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl6.internals>
+L<http://nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl6.internals>
=over 4
View
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ You can retrieve the size of the array using
This will put the size of the array in register C<P0> into C<I0>. In the same
way, assigning an integer directly to the array sets the size of the array.
-For instance:
+For instance:
new P0, .Array
set P0, 2
@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ before storing anything in it.
=head2 Accessing elements
-Elements are accessed using indexes, as in any programming language.
+Elements are accessed using indexes, as in any programming language.
The following code initializes an array in C<P0> with size two, and sets the
first position to the integer C<-8> and second position to the floating point
@@ -79,9 +79,9 @@ You can also assign directly from registers; for instance:
set P0[0], I0
set P0[1], N0
-leaves P0 in the same state as in the previous code snippet.
+leaves P0 in the same state as in the previous code snippet.
-To retrieve elements, we use the same syntax:
+To retrieve elements, we use the same syntax:
set N1, P0[1]
set I1, P0[0]
View
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ brand new Parrot string. This string will have its own private copy of the
buffer, so you don't need to keep it.
Additionally there several convenience functions, that are wrapping
-string_make_direct. See F<src/string.c> for details.
+string_make_direct. See F<src/string.c> for details.
=over 3
View
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ How to submit bug reports, patches and new files to Parrot.
If you encounter an error while working with Parrot, and don't understand what
is causing it, then submit a bug report using the F<parrotbug> utility. The
-simplest way to use it is to run
+simplest way to use it is to run
% ./parrotbug
View
@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ friends.
=head2 C source tests
-C source tests are usually located in F<t/src/*.t>. A simple test looks like:
+C source tests are usually located in F<t/src/*.t>. A simple test looks like:
c_output_is(<<'CODE', <<'OUTPUT', "name for test");
#include <stdio.h>

0 comments on commit ea0630c

Please sign in to comment.