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README.md

README.md

Open Data Structures in C

This is an implementation of Open Data Structures in C. It is written in ANSI C (C89) to maximize compatibility with other compilers.

Implemented data structures

More information on the data structures (implementation details, running times, etc.) can be found in the book.

How to use the library

If you have gcc installed, simply run either make to compile the shared object file or make install to compile and install the library (by default, it is moved to /usr/lib/libodsc.so). After that, you can append -lodsc to your compiler arguments to link your code with the library.

If you don't have gcc, you can modify the Makefile for your compiler (with clang, you only need to change the compiler variable, everything else should work the same). Or, compile the sources in src/ with the headers in include/.

The include directory contains the headers you will need to include in your program. Detailed information on the functions and their arguments can be found in the header files.

This library follows a general structure: [data structure]_[function]. For example, the function to initialize an ArrayStack is arraystack_init.

Example
#include <stdio.h>
#include <arraystack.h>

int main() {

    int i;

    arraystack_t stack;

    /* initialize the struct with the size of the elements you want to store
     * inside. this will allocate memory for the backing array. */
    arraystack_init(&stack, sizeof(int));

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        arraystack_push(&stack, &i);

    while (stack.length > 0) {

        arraystack_pop(&stack, &i);
        printf("popped: %d\n", i);
    }

    /* make sure to call dispose when you're done, to avoid memory leaks */
    arraystack_dispose(&stack);

    return 0;
}

Uniform iteration

Different data structures can require different methods to efficiently iterate over them. For example, it is possible to iterate through an ArrayStack using _get() but using the same method on a DLList would be costly. Uniform iterators provide a simple way of iterating over these data structures. Best to consider them invalidated if you do any kind of insertion/removal on the data structure you are iterating on. Iterators come with overhead since they have to maintain state and keep function pointers.

If an iterator is implemented for a data structure, it can be initialized through _iterator(). Iterators have three functions:

  • next(iterator_t *): Advances to the next element and returns 1, if available. Otherwise, returns 0. If iterating in reverse, this will advance to the previous element (not all data structures can be iterated in reverse order, check the documentation for _iterator()).
  • elem(iterator_t *): Returns a pointer to the element in the data structure (i.e. not a copy). Be careful not to exceed the bounds of this pointer (which is elem_size bytes).
  • dispose(iterator_t *): Releases allocated memory.
Example
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iterator.h>
#include <arraystack.h>

int main() {

    int i;

    arraystack_t stack;
    arraystack_init(&stack, sizeof(int));

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        arraystack_push(&stack, &i);

    /* make an iterator for stack[1,4] */
    iterator_t it;
    arraystack_iterator(&stack, &it, 1, 4);

    while (it.next(&it))
        printf("%d\n", *(int *)it.elem(&it));

    /* iterators allocate memory for state, which must be released. */
    it.dispose(&it);

    arraystack_dispose(&stack);

    return 0;
}