Skip to content
Browse files

Merge branch 'master' of github.com:WiredEnterprise/Lord-of-the-Files

  • Loading branch information...
2 parents 3fd1b50 + a1c9a01 commit 28c0cd532a26b255ff848dae013175307c0238a3 @WiredEnterprise WiredEnterprise committed Feb 24, 2012
Showing with 185 additions and 0 deletions.
  1. +12 −0 LEEME
  2. +86 −0 Lord-of-the-Files.de.txt
  3. +87 −0 Lord-of-the-Files.es.txt
View
12 LEEME
@@ -0,0 +1,12 @@
+Artículo El Señor de los Archivos
+
+Esta es la traducción al español del artículo Lord of the Files: How GitHub Tamed Free Software (And More), publicado el February 21, 2012.
+
+El artículo original tienen una licenci a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 license.
+(c) 2012 Robert McMillan & Wired.com, autores originales
+El artículo se encuentra en la web en esta dirección: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/02/github/
+
+Esta traducción
+(c) 2012 Eduardo Díaz http://www.lnds.net, La Naturaleza del Software
+
+La versión en español se encuentra en el archivo Lord-of-the-Files.es.txt
View
86 Lord-of-the-Files.de.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,86 @@
+Herr der Dateien: Wie GitHub Freie Software z�hmte (und mehr)
+
+Von Robert McMillan, Wired Enterprise
+
+SAN FRANCISCO � Als die Gr�nder von GitHub letztes Jahr in ihr mond�nes South-of-Market Loft umzogen, dekorierteb sie als erstes um. Sie �nderten das gr�sste B�ro der Etage in eine Parodie einer Chefsuite � komplett mit falschem Kamin, Pl�sch-Ledersessel und einem Holzglobus, der eine Flasche of Single Malt Scotch enth�lt. An der Wand h�ngt ein Katzengem�lde, verkleidet als Napoleon, mit f�nf Oktopus-�hnlichen Armen. Sie wird Octocat genannt.
+
+The point is that it�s not an executive suite. It�s a communal meeting room where anyone can hang out with anyone else, get some work done, and have a little fun at the same time.
+
+�Everybody can bring their friends into that room and sort of impress them and stuff,� says Scott Chacon, GitHub�s CIO co-founder. You see, Chacon and CEO Chris Wanstrath and the rest of the executive team don�t have private offices. They work on the open floor next to the coders, glued to monitors with the rest of the staff, listening to LCD Soundsystem. Loud.
+
+GitHub�s geektastic 14,000-square-foot loft mirrors its mission: to democratize computer programming. GitHub.com is best thought of as Facebook for geeks. Instead of uploading videos of your cat, you upload software. Anyone can comment on your code and add to it and build it into something better. The trick is that it decentralizes programming, giving everyone a new kind of control. GitHub has shaken up the way software gets written, making coding a little more anarchic, a little more fun, and a lot more productive.
+
+And the software world loves it. GitHub now has more than 1.3 million users, and over 2 million source code repositories � eight times the tally from just two years ago. If you count snippets of code and Wiki pages that are stored on the site, there are more than 4 million repositories. Two years ago, GitHub was a team of eight, holding company meetings in San Francisco cafes. By the beginning of 2011, they�d grown to 14 �hubbernauts� � as GitHub employees are affectionately called � and a year later, they�re at 57. In July, they took over the former digs of blogging outfit Six Apart. GitHub is growing fast � and it hasn�t taken a dime of venture funding.
+
+Once you�ve heard about GitHub, you start to see it almost everywhere. Sometimes, it�s hosting the code that underpins a big-name website. Other times, it�s driving a secret skunkworks project inside a Fortune 500 company. It has brought open source software that much closer to fulfilling its promise � but it doesn�t stop there. It�s also democratizing the creation of web pages and DNA analysis tools and maybe even the law of the land.
+
+�GitHub has changed the way that people approach development,� says Tom Preston-Werner, the company�s chief technology officer. �They realize that it doesn�t have to be so complex.�
+
+Git Scratches Itch
+
+Like so many other successful geek projects, GitHub began with coders scratching their own itch. About five years ago, Wanstrath and fellow programmer P.J. Hyett were both slinging code at Cnet, the tech news and reviews site. Their language of choice was Ruby on Rails, a programming framework that makes it easy to develop Web applications.
+
+As they built out their sites at Cnet, Wanstrath and Hyett wound up making a lot of improvements to Ruby on Rails itself. But they found it wasn�t so easy to get those changes integrated back into the open-source project. Following the then-dominant model of open source development, Rails was managed by a cadre of trusted coders who�d been given permission to �commit� changes to the project�s source code. To get one of their changes added to the central code, Wanstrath and Hyett would have to lobby one of those trusted coders and convince him that their change was worth integrating. That was often more work than writing the code in the first place.
+
+They weren�t the only developers chaffing under that Trusted Gatekeeper model of open source. A decade ago, Linus Torvalds found himself struggling to manage his role as gatekeeper of the Linux operating system he invented. In the beginning, Torvalds hosted Linux on a website belonging to the University of Helsinki. If people found a bug in the code, they�d send him a file with the changes via e-mail. If Torvalds read the e-mail and liked the changes, he�d incorporate them into Linux. But Torvalds is notorious for not reading all of his e-mail, so as the project got popular, more and more submissions were slipping through the cracks.
+
+This was the dirty little secret of open-source software. With the average free software project, large amounts of code � maybe even most code � never actually got used. It was often just too hard for casual users to show developers the changes they�d made and then easily merge those changes back into the open-source code base.
+
+The Second Coming of Linus
+
+So in 2005, Torvalds created Git, version control software specifically designed to take away the busywork of managing a software project. Using Git, anybody can tinker with their own version of Linux � or indeed any software project � and then, with a push of a button, share those changes with Torvalds or anyone else. There is no gatekeeper. In practical terms, Torvalds created a tool that makes it easy for someone to create an alternative to his Linux project. In technical terms, that�s called a �fork�.
+
+Back in the 1990s, forking was supposed to be a bad thing. It�s what created all of those competing, incompatible versions of Unix. For a while, there was a big fear that someone would somehow create their own fork of Linux, a version of the operating system that wouldn�t run the same programs or work in the same way. But in the Git world, forking is good. The trick was to make sure the improvements people worked out could be shared back with the community. It�s better to let people fork a project and tinker away with their own changes, than to shut them out altogether by only letting a few trusted authorities touch the code.
+
+On a rare sunny February day in Portland, Torvalds demonstrates Git for a Wired at his home office. With a few keystrokes, he quickly spots two new kernel submissions that change the same kernel code in different ways, a potential problem source.
+
+The old regime �makes it very hard to start radical new branches because you generally need to convince the people involved in the status quo up-front about their need to support that radical branch,� Torvalds says. �In contrast, Git makes it easy to just �do it� without asking for permission, and then come back later and show the end result off � telling people �look what I did, and I have the numbers to show that my approach is much better.��
+
+It may have been built for Linux, but Git quickly proved to be a godsend for any large organization managing giant code bases. Today, Facebook, Staples, Verizon and even Microsoft are users. At Google, Git is so important that the company pays Junio Hamano � who took over the project from Torvalds � to work on Git fulltime, and also pays the salary for the project�s second-in-command, Shawn Pearce.
+
+Git Without the �Pain in the Ass�
+
+The problem is that not everyone is Linus Torvalds, and not every company is Google. For the 99 percent, Git�s command-line interface is notoriously difficult to use. That�s where GitHub comes in. It simplifies Git. A lot. Its first slogan was: �Git hosting: No longer a pain in the ass.�
+
+Tom Preston-Werner dreamed up GitHub and roped Chris Wanstrath into the project one night in October 2007 at a coder�s meet-up at Zeke�s, a San Francisco sports bar a few blocks from the downtown stadium where the San Francisco Giants play.
+
+At first, GitHub was a side project. Wanstrath and Preston-Werner would meet on Saturdays to brainstorm, while coding during their free time and working their day jobs. �GitHub wasn�t supposed to be a startup or a company. GitHub was just a tool that we needed,� Wanstrath says. But � inspired by Gmail � they made the project a private beta and opened it up to others. Soon it caught on with the outside world.
+
+By January of 2008, Hyett was on board. And three months after that night in the sports bar, Wanstrath got a message from Geoffrey Grosenbach, the founder of PeepCode, a online learning site that had started using GitHub. �I�m hosting my company�s code here,� Grosenbach said. �I don�t feel comfortable not-paying you guys. Can I just send a check?�
+
+It was the first of many. In July 2008, Microsoft acquired Powerset, the startup that was providing Preston-Werner with a day job. The software giant offered Preston-Werner a $300,000 bonus and stock options to stay on board for another three years. But he quit, betting everything on GitHub.
+
+�It was a little scary at the time to give up something like that, but I would not change anything about that decision at all,� he says now.
+
+When Wired visited GitHub�s offices earlier this year, we found a bit of a geeks� paradise. There�s an iPhone-controlled quadcopter and a four-tap kegerator, and a conference room that�s a low-budget knockoff of the White House�s situation room, complete with a massive 1970's style red phone. But the toys aren�t what makes GitHub different. It�s the startup�s outright hostility toward corporate command-and-control that really sets it apart.
+
+�We don�t keep track of vacation days; we don�t keep track of hours. It doesn�t matter to us,� says CIO Scott Chacon. �I�ve been here at midnight and there are five people here. And I�ve been here in the middle of the day on a Thursday and there�s nobody here.�
+
+And yet it�s the most productive software development team he�s ever worked on, Chacon says.
+
+Git to the Future
+
+Preston-Werner�s bet has paid off. GitHub is now profitable. Users can sign up for free and start contributing, but they pay money if they want to privately host code there � starting at $7 per month. GitHub also sells an enterprise product that lets companies run your own version of GitHub behind the corporate firewall. That starts at $5,000 per year, but can cost hundreds of thousands annually for companies with hundreds of coders.
+
+Ironically, though, GitHub�s die-hard fans don�t include Torvalds, who briefly moved Linux kernel development to GitHub last September following a security breach at its old home.
+
+�I like GitHub a lot,� he says. �There�s a reason it became one of the biggest source code repositories rather quickly.� But he then unfurls a long list of all the �serious� problems he had with it when he hosted his code on the site � many of which have since been fixed. He couldn�t filter comments, the e-mail interface dropped attachments, the web interface messed up code contributions, and so on. The bottom line: GitHub makes it easy to code. But it can also make it easy to generate crap.
+
+That may be true, but it hasn�t held the site back. GitHub users are seemingly everywhere. On recent afternoon in San Francisco�s North Beach neighborhood, Wired was discussing the site with GitHub director of engineering Ryan Tomayko. Suddenly the guy at the next table leaned over and interrupted, like a teenager overhearing two strangers talk about his favorite band. �I just have to tell you,� he said, �GitHub is amazing.�
+
+It�s even feeding the Occupy movement. When Jonathan Baldwin wanted to write a cell-phone version of the People�s Microphone, used by Occupy to pass messages around big crowds, he posted his code straight to GitHub. The site let him share his code easily, and quickly connect with other developers to hammer out technical issues. �GitHub is the best thing ever. If you don�t host on GitHub, it doesn�t exist,� says Baldwin, a student at Parsons the New School for Design in New York.
+
+And software is only part of the story. Geeks are learning that GitHub can help manage other projects as well. Books and even transcripts of talks have popped up on the site. One GitHub user, Manu Sporny, published his DNA information to the site last year, in the hope of spurring development of open-source DNA analysis software by providing real test data to analyze.
+
+When Scott Chabon wrote a book about GitHub, the first fork appeared within a month. It was a German translation of his book. Now, three years later, it�s been translated into 10 languages, with another 10 translations in the works. Half of the traffic to the book�s website comes from China. �Tons of people in China are learning Git because they can read [the book] in Chinese on my website, because somebody provided that,� he says.
+
+Ryan Blair, a technologist with the New York State Senate, thinks it could even give citizens a way to fork the law � proposing their own amendments to elected officials. A tool like GitHub could also make it easier for constituents to track and even voice their opinions on changes to complex legal code. �When you really think about it, a bill is a branch of the law,� he says. �I�m just in love with the idea of a constituent being able to send their state senator a pull request.�
+
+GitHub today is the darling of the open-source world, but this year, the company has set its sights on Microsoft. The company recently hired a pair of developers from the software giant, and it�s working on new software to rope in the still-considerable army of coders who write programs using Microsoft�s software development tools.
+
+�I want to live in a world where it�s easier to work together than to work alone� where every part of the software development process is a joy,� says CEO Wanstrath. �And I think GitHub can help make that happen.
+
+
+SIDEBAR:
+
+Why Git? It�s the British slang term for stupid, despicable person � arse. The joke �I name all my projects for myself, first Linux, then git� was just too good to pass up. But it is also short, easy-to-say, and type on a standard keyboard. And reasonably unique and not any standard command, which is unusual.�Linus Torvalds
View
87 Lord-of-the-Files.es.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,87 @@
+El Se�or de los Archivos: C�mo GitHub Domestic� al Software Libre (Y M�s)
+
+por Robert McMillan, Wired Enterprise
+
+
+SAN FRANCISCO � Cuando los fundadores de GitHub se trasladaron a su ostentoso loft en South-of-Market el a�o pasado, lo primero que hicieron fue redecorar. Convirtieron la oficina m�s grande del piso en la parodia de una suite ejecutiva, completamente incluyendo una chimenea falsa, sillones de felpa y un globo terr�queo de madera que se abre para revelar una botella de whisky escoc�s de malta. Colgado de la pared est� una pintura de un gato, vestido como Napole�n, con cinco piernas de pulpo. Lo llaman el Octocat.
+
+Lo cierto es que esta no es una suite ejecutiva. Es una sala de reuniones comunal donde cualquiera puede juntarse con alguien m�s, y tener algo de diversi�n al mismo tiempo.
+
+�Todos pueden traer a sus amigos a esta sala y tratar de impresionarlos y ese tipo de cosas", dice Scott Chacon, CIO de GitHub y cofundador. Ver�n, Chacon, el CEO Chris Wanstrath y el resto del equipo ejecutivo no tienen oficinas privadas. Trabajan en el piso abierto junto a los programadores, pegados a los monitores con el resto del equipo, escuchando a LCD Soundsystem. Fuerte.
+
+El fant�stico loft de 1.300 metros cuadrados refleja su misi�n: democratizar la programaci�n de computadores. GitHub.com puede ser visto como un Facebook para geeks. En vez de subir videos de tu gato, subes software. Cualquiera puede comentar tu c�digo y agregarle algo, y construir sobre este algo mejor. El truco es la programaci�n descentralizada, d�ndole a cada uno un nuevo tipo de control. GitHub ha remecido la manera en que el software se escribe, haciendo la codificaci�n un poco m�s an�rquica, un poco m�s divertida, y mucho m�s productiva.
+
+El mundo del software lo ama. GitHub ahora tiene m�s de 1.3 millones de usuarios, y sobre 2 millones de repositorios de c�digo fuente, ocho veces la cantidad de hace dos a�os atr�s. Si cuentas secciones de c�digo y p�ginas Wiki que est�n almacenadas en el sitio, hay m�s de 4 millones de repositorios. Dos a�os atr�s, GitHub era un equipo de ocho, sosteniendo reuniones de la compa��a en los caf�s de San Francisco. Hacia el principio de 2011, hab�a crecido a 14 �hubbernautas� (como se llaman afectuosamente a los empleados de GitHub) y un a�os despu�s, est�n en 57. En julio tomaron las antiguas oficinas de la empresa de blogging Six Apart. GitHub est� creciendo r�pido, y no ha tomado un centavo de fondos de riesgo.
+
+Una vez que has escuchado sobre GitHub, comienzas a verlo casi en todos lados. A veces est� alojando el c�digo que soporta un website de renombre. Otras veces est� impulsando un secreto proyecto dentro de una compa��a Fortune 500. Ha llevado el software abierto mucho m�s cerca de cumplir su promesa, pero no se detienen all�. Est� democratizando la creaci�n de p�ginas web y herramientas de an�lisis de ADN y tal vez incluso las leyes de la tierra.
+
+�GitHub ha cambiado la manera en que la gente se aproxima al desarrollo," dice Tom Preston-Werner, el director de tecnolog�a de la compa��a. �Se dan cuenta que no tiene que ser tan complejo.�
+
+Git Rasca la Comez�n
+
+Como tantos otros proyectos geek exitosos, GitHub comenz� con programadores rascando su propia picaz�n. Hace cinco a�os atr�s, Wanstrath y su colega programador P.J. Hyett estaban escribiendo c�digo en Cnet, el sitio de noticias y comentarios sobre tecnolog�a. El lenguaje que eligieron fue Ruby on Rails, un ambiente de programaci�n que facilita desarrollar aplicaciones web.
+
+En la medida que constru�an sus sitios en Cnet, Wanstrath y Hyett comenzaron a construir una cantidad de mejoras a Ruby on Rails en si mismo. Pero encontraron que no era f�cil lograr integrar estos cambios de vuelta en el proyecto de c�digo abierto. Siguiendo el modelo de desarrollo de c�digo abierto dominante entonces, Rails era administrado por un cuadro de desarrolladores de confianza a quienes se le hab�a dado el permiso para "enviar" cambios al c�digo fuente del proyecto. Para lograr que sus cambios fueran agregados al c�digo central, Wanstrath y Hyett tendr�an que hacer lobby a uno de estos programadores de confianza y convencerle de que sus cambios val�an la pena para ser incorporados. Eso a menudo era m�s trabajo que escribir el c�digo en primer lugar.
+
+Ellos no eran los �nicos desarrolladores con problema con el modelo del Cuidador de Confianza del c�digo abierto. Una d�cada atr�s, Linus Torvalds se encontraba lidiando con su rol de cuidador del sistema operativo Linux que �l hab�a inventado. En el principio, Torvalds aloj� Linux en un sitio web que pertenec�a a la Universidad de Helsinki. Si la gente encontraba un error en el c�digo, le enviaban un archivo con los cambios v�a email. Si Torvalds le�a el email y le gustaban los cambios, el incorporar�a los cambios en Linux. Pero Torvalds es conocido por no leer todos sus emails, as� que en la medida que el proyecto se hac�a popular, m�s y m�s propuestas se escurr�an por las grietas.
+
+Este era el peque�o secreto sucio del software de fuente abierta. Con el proyecto de software libre promedio, grandes cantidades de c�digo, quiz�s demasiado c�digo, nunca llegaban a ser usadas. Era a menudo demasiado dif�cil para el usuario casual mostrarle a los desarrolladores los cambios que hab�a hecho y despu�s integrar f�cilmente estos cambios de vuelta a la base de c�digo.
+
+La Segunda Venida de Linus
+
+As� que en el 2005, Torvalds crea Git, un software de control de versiones espec�ficamente dise�ado para librarse del pesado trabajo de administrar proyectos de software. Usando Git, cualquiera puede manipular su propia versi�n de Linux, o en realidad de cualquier proyecto de software, y luego, presionando un bot�n, compartir esos cambios con Torvalds o cualquier otro. No hay guardi�n. En t�rminos pr�cticos, Torvalds cre� una herramienta que facilita a cualquiera la creaci�n de alternativas a su proyecto Linux. En t�rminos t�cnicos, esto se llama un "fork".
+
+En los 1990s, el "forking" se consideraba algo malo. Era lo que hab�a creado todas esas versiones incompatibles de Unix. Por un tiempo, hab�a un gran temor de que alguien pudiera crear su propia versi�n de Linux, una versi�n que no pudiera correr los mismos programas o trabajara de la misma forma. Pero en el mundo de Git, el "forking" es bueno. El truco es asegurarse que los cambios que la gente realiza puedan ser compartidos de vuelta con la comunidad. Es mejor dejar que la gente versione un proyecto y lo manipule con sus propios cambios, que cerrarlo todo permiti�ndole a unas pocas autoridades confiables que toquen el c�digo.
+
+En un d�a soleado poco habitual en Portland, Torvalds demostr� Git a Wired en la oficina de su casa. Con unos pocos golpes de teclado, el pudo revisar dos nuevos aportes al kernel que cambiaban el mismo c�digo de formas diferentes, un potencial problema en el fuente.
+
+El viejo r�gimen "hace muy dif�cil empezar una rama radical porque generalmente tienes que convencer a la gente comprometida con el status quo desde el principio sobre la necesidad de soportar este cambio radical", dice Torvalds. "En contraste, Git facilita esto para que simplemente 'lo hagas' sin pedir permiso, y entonces puedas volver y mostrar como result� todo, dici�ndole a la gente 'miren lo que hice, y tengo los n�meros para mostrar que mi aproximaci�n es mucho mejor.'"
+
+Puede haber sido hecho para Linux, pero Git r�pidamente result� ser una bendici�n para cualquier organizaci�n grande manejando bases de c�digo gigantescas. Hoy en d�a Facebook, Staples, Verizon e incluso Microsoft son usuarios. En Google, Git es tan importante que la compa��a le paga a Junio Hamano, quien se hizo cargo del proyecto despu�s de Torvalds, para que trabaje en Git a tiempo completo, y tambi�n paga el salario para el segundo a cargo, Shawn Pearce.
+
+Git sin el 'dolor en el trasero'
+
+El problema es que no todos son Linus Torvalds, y no todas las compa��as son Google. Para el 99 por ciento, la interfaz de linea de comandos de Git es notoriamente dif�cil de usar. Ah� es donde viene GitHub. Simplifica Git. Un mont�n. Su primer eslogan era: �Git hosting: No longer a pain in the ass.� (Alojamiento Git sin las molestias)
+
+Tom Preston-Werner so�� sobre GitHub e involucr� a Chris Wanstrath en el proyecto una noche de octubre de 2007, en un encuentro de programadores en Zeke, un bar deportivo en San Francisco, a unas cuadras del estadio donde juegan los Gigantes de San Francisco.
+
+Al principio, GitHub era un proyecto lateral. Wanstrath y Preston-Werner se encontrar�an los s�bados para planificar, mientras que escribir�an c�digo durante su tiempo libre y sus trabajos diarios. �No se supon�a que GitHub fuera una startup o una compa��a startup. GitHub era s�lo una herramienta que necesit�bamos,� dice Wanstrath. Pero, inspirados por Gmail, hicieron una beta privada del proyecto y lo abrieron a otros. Pronto se pudo de moda en el mundo exterior.
+
+Para enero de 2008, Hyett estaba a bordo. Y tres meses despu�s de esa noche en el bar deportivo, Wanstrath recibi� un mensaje de Geoffrey Grosenbach, el fundador de PeepCode, un sitio educativo en linea, que hab�a empezado a usar GitHub. �Estoy alojando el c�digo de mi compa��a aqu�", les dijo Grosenbach. �No me siento c�modo sin pagarles chicos. �Puedo enviarles un cheque?�
+
+Fue el primero de muchos. En julio de 2008, Microsoft adquiri� Powerset, la startup que le prove�a a Preston-Werner de un trabajo de d�a. El gigante del software le ofrecieron a Preston-Werner a $300,000 dolares y opciones de acciones para que se quedara a bordo por otros tres a�os. Pero el se retir�, apostando todo a GitHub.
+
+�Daba un poco de miedo en ese tiempo rechazar algo as�, pero no cambiar�a nada de esa decisi�n en absoluto", dice ahora.
+
+Cuando Wired visit� las oficinas de GitHub�s a principios de este a�o, encontramos una suerte de para�so geek. Hay un quac�ptero controlado por un iPhone y un dispensador de cerveza de cuatro grifos, una sala de conferencias que como una escenograf�a de bajo presupuesto de la sala de situaciones de la Casa Blanca, completa con unos enormes tel�fonos rojos al estilo de los 1970s. Pero los juguetes no son lo que hacen a GitHub diferente. Es la abierta hostilidad de la startup a comando y control corporativo lo que la diferencia.
+
+�No llevamos un registro de los d�as de vacaciones, no tenemos registro de las horas. No nos importa", dice el CIO Scott Chacon. �He estado ac� a la medianoche y hay cinco personas aqu�. Y he estado al mediod�a de un jueves y no hay nadie."
+
+Y a�n as� es el equipo de desarrollo de software m�s productivo con el que he trabajado, dice Chacon.
+
+Git hacia el futuro
+
+La apuesta de Preston-Werner�s se ha pagado. GitHub es ahora rentable. Los usuarios pueden firmar gratuitamente y comenzar a contribuir, pero deben pagar dinero si quieren que su c�digo sea alojado de forma privada, comenzado a los $7 dolares al mes. GitHub tambi�n vende una vers�n empresarial del producto que permite a las compa��as correr su propia versi�n de GitHub detr�s del cortafuegos corporativo. Esto empieza a los $5,000 dolares por a�o, pero puede costar cientos de miles de d�lares anualmente para compa��as con cientos de programadores.
+
+Ir�nicamente, sin embargo, los fans m�s duros de GitHub no incluyen a Torvalds, quien brevemente movi� el kernel de desarrollo a GitHub el pasado septiembre despu�s de una falla de seguridad en su antiguo hogar.
+
+�Me gusta mucho GitHub,� dice. �Hay una raz�n por la que lleg� a ser uno de los repositorios de c�digo fuentes m�s grandes en forma tan r�pida". Pero luego desenrolla una larga lista de todos los problemas "serios" que ha tenido con �l cuando ha alojado su c�digo en el sitio, muchos de los cuales han sido reparados desde entonces. No pod�a filtrar comentarios, la interfaz de correo perd�a anexos, la interfaz web desordenaba las contribuciones al c�digo, y as�. El balance: GitHub facilita escribir c�digo. Pero tambi�n facilita generar basura."
+
+Eso podr�a ser cierto, pero el sitio no ha vuelto atr�s. Los usuarios GitHub est�n aparentemente por todos lados. En una tarde reciente en la vecindad de la Playa Norte de San Francisco, Wired estaba discutiendo el sitio con el director de ingenier�a de GitHub Ryan Tomayko. De repente la persona en la mesa pr�xima se acerc� e interrumpi�, como un adolescente escuchando a dos extra�os hablar de su banda favorita. "Les tengo que decir", dijo, "GitHub es asombroso."
+
+Incluso apoya al movimiento Occupy. Cuando Jonathan Baldwin quiso escribir la versi�n para tel�fonos celulares del Micr�fono del Pueblo, usado por Occupy para pasar mensajes a trav�s de grandes multitudes, el public� su c�digo directamente en GitHub. El sitio le deja compartir el c�digo f�cilmente, y r�pidamente conectar con otros desarrolladores para trabajar en los asuntos t�cnicos. �GitHub es lo mejor. Si no alojas en GitHub, entonces no existe", dice Baldwin, un estudiante en Parsons, La Nueva Escuela de Dise�o en Nueva York.
+
+Y el software es s�lo parte de la historia. Los geeks est�n aprendiendo que GitHub puede ayudar para manejar otros proyectos. Libros, incluso transcripciones de charlas han aparecido en el sitio. Un usuario GitHub, Manu Sporny, public� la informaci�n de su ADN en el sitio el a�o pasado, con la esperanza de estimular el desarrollo de software de an�lisis de ADN de c�digo abierto proveyendo datos reales para el an�lisis.
+
+Cuando Scott Chacon escribi� un libro sobre GitHub, el primer fork apareci� en un mes. Era una traducci�n al alem�n de su libro. Ahora, tres a�os despu�s, ha sido traducido a 10 lenguajes, con otras 10 traducciones en trabajo. La mitad del tr�fico al sitio web del libro viene de China. �Miles de personas en China est�n aprendiendo Git porque pueden leer [el libro] en chino en mi sitio web, porque alguien lo ha provisto,", dice
+
+Ryan Blair, un tecn�logo con el Senado del Estado de Nueva York, piensa que a�n puede darle a los ciudadanos una manera de versionar la ley, proponiendo sus propias enmiendas a los oficiales electos. Una herramienta como GitHub podr�a facilitar a los constituyentes rastrear y a�n tener voz para sus opiniones en los cambios del complejo c�digo legal. �Cuando realmente lo piensas, un proyecto de ley es una rama de la ley", dice. "Me encanta la idea de que un constituyente sea capaz de enviar a su senador estatal un pull request.�
+
+GitHub es el regal�n del mundo open source, pero este a�o la compa��a ha puesto su vista sobre Microsoft. La compa��a recientemente contrat� a un par de desarrolladores del gigante del software, y est� trabajando en nuevo software para atraer al a�n considerable ej�rcito de codificadores que programan usando las herramientas de desarrollo de Microsoft.
+
+�Quiero vivir en un mundo donde es m�s f�cil trabajar juntos que trabajar solos... donde cada parte del proceso de desarrollo de software es un placer", dice el CEO Wanstrath. �Y creo que GitHub puede ayudar a que eso pase."
+
+
+LATERAL:
+
+�Por qu� Git? Es el t�rmino popular brit�nico para est�pido, persona despreciable, asno. El chiste "Nombro todos mis proyecto por mi mismo, primero Linux, despu�s git." era demasiado bueno para dejarlo pasar. Pero tambi�n es algo corto, f�cil de decir, y escribir en un teclado est�ndar. Y razonablemente �nico y no como cualquier comando est�ndar, lo que es inusual. - Linus Torvalds

0 comments on commit 28c0cd5

Please sign in to comment.
Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.