A Ruby terminal progress_bar
Ruby
Latest commit 9a7c226 Nov 25, 2016 @paul Bump to 1.1.0

README.mkd

ProgressBar

Build StatusGem Version

ProgressBar is a simple Ruby library for displaying progress of long-running tasks on the console. It is intended to be as simple to use as possible.

NOTE: This project isn't dead! It's just feature complete, and I don't want to keep adding things to it. If you find bugs, please open an Issue, or even better, a Pull Request, and I'll take a look. We at ProgressBar know you have lots of progress bar alternatives, and we thank you for using ProgressBar!

Installation

gem install progress_bar

Examples

The Easy Way

require 'progress_bar'
bar = ProgressBar.new

100.times do
  sleep 0.1
  bar.increment!
end

Produces output like:

[#######################################                           ] [ 59.00%] [00:06]

Note: It may not be exactly like this. I might have changed the default meters between now and when I wrote this readme, and forgotten to update it.

Setting the Max

Usually, the defaults should be fine, the only thing you'll need to tweak is the max.

bar = ProgressBar.new(1000)

Larger Steps

If you want to process several things, and update less often, you can pass a number to #increment!

bar.increment! 42

Picking the meters

By default, ProgressBar will use all available meters (this will probably change). To select which meters you want, and in which order, pass them to the constructor:

bar = ProgressBar.new(100, :bar, :rate, :eta)

Available Meters

  • :bar -- The bar itself, fills empty space with "#"s. Ex: [### ].
  • :counter -- Number of items complete, over the max. Ex: [ 20/100]
  • :percentage -- Percentage of items in the maximum. Ex: [ 42%]
  • :elapsed -- Time elapsed (since the ProgressBar was initialized. Ex: [00:42]
  • :eta -- Estimated Time remaining. Given the rate that items are completed, a guess at how long the rest will take. Ex: [01:30]
  • :rate -- The rate at which items are being completed. Ex: [ 42.42/s]

Run the tests to see examples of all the formats, with different values and maximums.

gem install --development progress_bar
rspec spec/*_spec.rb

Using ProgressBar on Enumerable-alikes.

If you do a lot of progresses, you can shorten your way with this:

class Array
  include ProgressBar::WithProgress
end

[1,2,3].each_with_progress{do_something}

# or any other Enumerable's methods:

(1..1000).to_a.with_progress.select{|i| (i % 2).zero?}

You can include ProgressBar::WithProgress in any class, having methods #count and #each, like some DB datasets and so on.

If you are using progress_bar regularly on plain arrays, you may want to do:

require 'progress_bar/core_ext/enumerable_with_progress'

# it adds each_with_progress/with_progress to Array/Hash/Range

(1..400).with_progress.select{|i| (i % 2).zero?}