A resque plugin that ensures that only one job for a given queue will be running on any worker at a given time.
Clone or download
Pull request Compare This branch is 19 commits ahead of wallace:master.
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
lib
spec
.gitignore
.ruby-version
.travis.yml
CODE_OF_CONDUCT.md
Gemfile
LICENSE
README.md
Rakefile
resque-unique_at_runtime.gemspec

README.md

Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime

Project Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime
gem name resque-unique_at_runtime
license License: MIT
download rank Downloads Today
version Version
dependencies Depfu
continuous integration Build Status
test coverage Test Coverage
maintainability Maintainability
code triage Open Source Helpers
homepage on Github.com, on Railsbling.com
documentation on RDoc.info
Spread ♡ⓛⓞⓥⓔ♡ 🌍 🌎 🌏, 🍚, , 👼, 🐛, :shipit:, Tweet Peter

A semanticaly versioned Resque plugin which ensures for a given queue, that only one worker is working on a job at any given time.

Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime differs from resque-lonely_job in that it is compatible with, and can be used at the same time as, resque-solo.

Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime differs from resque_solo in that resque-solo offers queue-time uniqueness, while resque-unique_at_runtime offers runtime uniqueness. The same difference applies to other queue-time uniqueness gems: resque-queue-lock, resque-lock.

Runtime uniqueness without queue-time uniqueness means the same job may be queued multiple times but you're guaranteed that first job queued will run to completion before subsequent jobs are run.

However, you can use both runtime and queue-time uniqueness together in the same project.

To use resque-solo and resque-unique_at_runtime together, with fine control of per job configuration of uniqueness at runtime and queue-time, it is recommended to use resque-unique_by_arity.

NOTE: There is a strong possibility that subsequent jobs are re-ordered due to the implementation of reenqueue. (See Example #2 for an alternative approach that attempts to preserve job ordering but introduces the possibility of starvation.)

Therefore it is recommended that the payload for jobs be stored in a separate redis list distinct from the Resque queue (see Example #3).

Requirements

Requires a version of MRI Ruby >= 1.9.3.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'resque-unique_at_runtime', '~> 1.0.0'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install resque-unique_at_runtime

Usage

Example #1 -- One job running per queue

require 'resque-unique_at_runtime'

class StrictlySerialJob
  extend Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime

  @queue = :serial_work

  def self.perform
    # only one at a time in this block, no parallelism allowed for this
    # particular queue
  end
end

Example #2 -- One job running per user-defined attribute

Let's say you want the serial constraint to apply at a more granular level. Instead of applying at the queue level, you can overwrite the .redis_key method.

require 'resque-unique_at_runtime'

class StrictlySerialJob
  extend Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime

  @queue = :serial_work

  # Returns a string that will be used as the redis key
  # NOTE: it is recommended to prefix your string with the 'unique_at_runtime:' to
  # namespace your key!
  def self.unique_at_runtime_redis_key(account_id, *args)
    "unique_at_runtime:strictly_serial_job:#{account_id}"
  end

  # Overwrite reenqueue to lpush instead of default rpush.  This attempts to
  # preserve job ordering but job order is *NOT* guaranteed and also not
  # likely. See the comment on SHA: e9912fb2 for why.
  def self.reenqueue(*args)
    Resque.redis.lpush("queue:#{Resque.queue_from_class(self)}", Resque.encode(class: self, args: args))
  end

  def self.perform(account_id, *args)
    # only one at a time in this block, no parallelism allowed for this
    # particular unique_at_runtime_redis_key
  end
end

NOTE: Without careful consideration of your problem domain, worker starvation and/or unfairness is possible for jobs in this example. Imagine a scenario where you have three jobs in the queue with two resque workers:

+---------------------------------------------------+
| :serial_work                                      |
|---------------------------------------------------|
|             |             |             |         |
| unique_at_runtime_redis_key:  | unique_at_runtime_redis_key:  | unique_at_runtime_redis_key:  | ...     |
|    A        |    A        |    B        |         |
|             |             |             |         |
| job 1       | job 2       | job 3       |         |
+---------------------------------------------------+
                                  ^
                                  |
  Possible starvation +-----------+
  for this job and
  subsequent ones

When the first worker grabs job 1, it'll acquire the mutex for processing redis_key A. The second worker tries to grab the next job off the queue but is unable to acquire the mutex for redis_key A so it places job 2 back at the head of the :serial_work queue. Until worker 1 completes job 1 and releases the mutex for redis_key A, no work will be done in this queue.

This issue may be avoided by employing dynamic queues, http://blog.kabisa.nl/2010/03/16/dynamic-queue-assignment-for-resque-jobs/, where the queue is a one to one mapping to the redis_key.

Example #3 -- One job running per user-defined attribute with job ordering preserved

The secret to preserving job order semantics is to remove critical data from the resque job and store data in a separate redis list. Part of a running job's responsibility will be to grab data off of the separate redis list needed for it to complete its job.

+---------------------------------------------------+
| :serial_work for jobs associated with key A       |
|---------------------------------------------------|
|   data x    |   data y    |   data z    | ...     |
+---------------------------------------------------+

+---------------------------------------------------+
| :serial_work for jobs associated with key B       |
|---------------------------------------------------|
|   data m    |   data n    |   data o    | ...     |
+---------------------------------------------------+

+---------------------------------------------------+
| :serial_work                                      |
|---------------------------------------------------|
|             |             |             |         |
| unique_at_runtime_redis_key:  | unique_at_runtime_redis_key:  | unique_at_runtime_redis_key:  | ...     |
|    A        |    A        |    B        |         |
|             |             |             |         |
| job 1       | job 2       | job 3       |         |
+---------------------------------------------------+

It now doesn't matter whether job 1 and job 2 are re-ordered as whichever goes first will perform an atomic pop on the redis list that contains the data needed for its job (data x, data y, data z).

Example #4 -- Requeue interval

The behavior when multiple jobs exist in a queue protected by resque-unique_at_runtime is for one job to be worked, while the other is continuously dequeued and requeued until the first job is finished. This can result in that worker process pegging a CPU/core on a worker server. To guard against this, the default behavior is to sleep for 1 second before the requeue, which will allow the cpu to perform other work.

This can be customized using a @runtime_requeue_interval class instance variable in your job like so:

require 'resque-unique_at_runtime'

class StrictlySerialJob
  extend Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime

  @queue = :serial_work
  @runtime_requeue_interval = 5         # sleep for 5 seconds before requeueing

  def self.perform
    # some implementation
  end
end

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/pboling/resque-unique_at_runtime. This project is intended to be a safe, welcoming space for collaboration, and contributors are expected to adhere to the Contributor Covenant code of conduct.

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Added some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Code of Conduct

Everyone interacting in the Resque::Plugins::UniqueAtRuntime project’s codebases, issue trackers, chat rooms and mailing lists is expected to follow the code of conduct.

Versioning

This library aims to adhere to Semantic Versioning 2.0.0. Violations of this scheme should be reported as bugs. Specifically, if a minor or patch version is released that breaks backward compatibility, a new version should be immediately released that restores compatibility. Breaking changes to the public API will only be introduced with new major versions.

As a result of this policy, you can (and should) specify a dependency on this gem using the Pessimistic Version Constraint with two digits of precision.

For example:

spec.add_dependency 'resque-unique_at_runtime', '~> 0.0'

License

License: MIT