The StoryHarp Interactive Fiction Audioventure Authoring Software in Java
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README.txt

Run StoryHarp using the main in TConsoleWindow.java.

===

The StoryHarp software was mainly developed by Paul Fernhout, building on a  platform Paul Fernhout and Cynthia Kurtz developed for the Garden With Insight Garden Simulator in Delphi as well as the subsequent PlantStudio software that Cynthia was the main developer for (for making 3D models of plants). For the StoryHarp project, Cynthia did user testing, sample data files, and the help system. Aspects of StoryHarp were inspired by the Smalltalk development environment.

For more about these there software systems (all free and open source software, and a labor of love taking up about eight person-years), see:
  http://www.kurtz-fernhout.com/

===

This code was translated from Delphi to Java using a tool Paul Fernhout wrote to do some of the heavy lifting, but requiring hand-clean up afterwards.

The basic application runs, but more complex parts of the application remain unported. While the code runs, there remain syntactic errors in the code base related to porting  that essentially indicate places needing more work.

The StoryHarp code is Copyright 1993-2011 Paul D. Fernhout and Cynthia F. Kurtz  
The StoryHarp code included here is hereby placed under the GNU GPL v3.0 or any later version. See: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
    
===

"StoryHarp" is a trademark of Paul D. Fernhout and Cynthia F. Kurtz. Basically, similar to with the "Linux" trademork,
  http://www.linuxfoundation.org/programs/legal/trademark
if you make useful derivatives of the code under the GPL related to interactive fiction, and true to the purpose of openness and sharing as we see it, and with proper attribution as to the origins of the software, we will permit you to use the trademark. Otherwise we will request you to change the name of the software you distribute to avoid confusion.

=== On motivations

Related on motivation by Dan Pink:
  "RSA Animate - Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us"
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc
  
And: "If you love somebody, set them free (Sting)"

And someday we may see a balance shift between five interwoven economies in a way that gives more people more time for making more free stuff (whether through a basic income, 3D printing, more gift giving, or better democratic planning), as Paul talks about in this video:
  "Five Interwoven Economies: Subsistence, Gift, Exchange, Planned, and Theft"
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vK-M_e0JoY

We hope everyone out there is getting the right amount of vitamin D, since humans need sunlight, just like plants. We both became vitamin D deficient working indoors so much on computers, and it was bad for our health.

Stories can also make you well in more ways than psychologically by enjoying them and caring for them. If you hear a useful story, say about the value of eating a lot of vegetables, fruits, and beans,  listening to stories told by people like Dr. Joel Fuhrman, while nothing is certain in life,  you can probably avoid or delay a lot of health issues like heart disease, cancer, diabetes,  dementia, and so on. Paul lost fifty pounds to return to a healthy weight and lower his blood pressure significantly by following that kind of advice gleaned from stories about healing people share over the internet.  It's helping Cynthia too. It seems the "battle of the bulge" is mostly fought and won in the supermarket. We wish we had appreciated the miracle of healing through plants and stories a lot earlier in life. Obviously, one anecdote is just an anecdote, but a lot of stories can add up to real data.

Cynthia has been working in the field of Narrative Analysis for the past decade, and is also working on more free and open source software related to stories called Rakontu (but this time, about collecting and sharing stories from real people's lives, not creating them as with StoryHarp).
  http://www.rakontu.org/

We hope whatever world you live in, it has a lot of interesting and beautiful plants and stories in it (both real and virtual). Ideally we hope those plants and stories could grow in world  that is happy,  healthy, joyful, abundant, and intrinsically/mutually secure for all. It has been an honor, and a privilege  to help create tools to help others create such worlds (and, even with a lot of ups and downs along the way, a lot of "hard fun" as well).

--Paul Fernhout and Cynthia Kurtz
July 7, 2011