Exporter for machine metrics
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README.md

Percona Node Exporter

Prometheus exporter for hardware and OS metrics exposed by *NIX kernels, written in Go with pluggable metric collectors.

The WMI exporter is recommended for Windows users.

This fork adds HTTP Basic authentication and TLS support using Percona's shared code for exporters.

Collectors

There is varying support for collectors on each operating system. The tables below list all existing collectors and the supported systems.

Which collectors are used is controlled by the --collectors.enabled flag.

Enabled by default

Name Description OS
conntrack Shows conntrack statistics (does nothing if no /proc/sys/net/netfilter/ present). Linux
cpu Exposes CPU statistics Darwin, Dragonfly, FreeBSD
diskstats Exposes disk I/O statistics from /proc/diskstats. Linux
edac Exposes error detection and correction statistics. Linux
entropy Exposes available entropy. Linux
exec Exposes execution statistics. Dragonfly, FreeBSD
filefd Exposes file descriptor statistics from /proc/sys/fs/file-nr. Linux
filesystem Exposes filesystem statistics, such as disk space used. Darwin, Dragonfly, FreeBSD, Linux, OpenBSD
hwmon Expose hardware monitoring and sensor data from /sys/class/hwmon/. Linux
infiniband Exposes network statistics specific to InfiniBand configurations. Linux
loadavg Exposes load average. Darwin, Dragonfly, FreeBSD, Linux, NetBSD, OpenBSD, Solaris
mdadm Exposes statistics about devices in /proc/mdstat (does nothing if no /proc/mdstat present). Linux
meminfo Exposes memory statistics. Darwin, Dragonfly, FreeBSD, Linux
netdev Exposes network interface statistics such as bytes transferred. Darwin, Dragonfly, FreeBSD, Linux, OpenBSD
netstat Exposes network statistics from /proc/net/netstat. This is the same information as netstat -s. Linux
sockstat Exposes various statistics from /proc/net/sockstat. Linux
stat Exposes various statistics from /proc/stat. This includes CPU usage, boot time, forks and interrupts. Linux
textfile Exposes statistics read from local disk. The --collector.textfile.directory flag must be set. any
time Exposes the current system time. any
uname Exposes system information as provided by the uname system call. Linux
vmstat Exposes statistics from /proc/vmstat. Linux
wifi Exposes WiFi device and station statistics. Linux
zfs Exposes ZFS performance statistics. Linux

Disabled by default

Name Description OS
bonding Exposes the number of configured and active slaves of Linux bonding interfaces. Linux
buddyinfo Exposes statistics of memory fragments as reported by /proc/buddyinfo. Linux
devstat Exposes device statistics Dragonfly, FreeBSD
drbd Exposes Distributed Replicated Block Device statistics Linux
interrupts Exposes detailed interrupts statistics. Linux, OpenBSD
ipvs Exposes IPVS status from /proc/net/ip_vs and stats from /proc/net/ip_vs_stats. Linux
ksmd Exposes kernel and system statistics from /sys/kernel/mm/ksm. Linux
logind Exposes session counts from logind. Linux
meminfo_numa Exposes memory statistics from /proc/meminfo_numa. Linux
mountstats Exposes filesystem statistics from /proc/self/mountstats. Exposes detailed NFS client statistics. Linux
nfs Exposes NFS client statistics from /proc/net/rpc/nfs. This is the same information as nfsstat -c. Linux
runit Exposes service status from runit. any
supervisord Exposes service status from supervisord. any
systemd Exposes service and system status from systemd. Linux
tcpstat Exposes TCP connection status information from /proc/net/tcp and /proc/net/tcp6. (Warning: the current version has potential performance issues in high load situations.) Linux

Deprecated

These collectors will be (re)moved in the future.

Name Description OS
gmond Exposes statistics from Ganglia. any
megacli Exposes RAID statistics from MegaCLI. Linux
ntp Exposes time drift from an NTP server. any

Textfile Collector

The textfile collector is similar to the Pushgateway, in that it allows exporting of statistics from batch jobs. It can also be used to export static metrics, such as what role a machine has. The Pushgateway should be used for service-level metrics. The textfile module is for metrics that are tied to a machine.

To use it, set the --collector.textfile.directory flag on the Node exporter. The collector will parse all files in that directory matching the glob *.prom using the text format.

To atomically push completion time for a cron job:

echo my_batch_job_completion_time $(date +%s) > /path/to/directory/my_batch_job.prom.$$
mv /path/to/directory/my_batch_job.prom.$$ /path/to/directory/my_batch_job.prom

To statically set roles for a machine using labels:

echo 'role{role="application_server"} 1' > /path/to/directory/role.prom.$$
mv /path/to/directory/role.prom.$$ /path/to/directory/role.prom

Building and running

make
./node_exporter <flags>

Running tests

make test

Visualize

There is a Grafana dashboard for Host available as a part of PMM project, you can see the demo here.

Submit Bug Report

If you find a bug in Percona Node Exporter or one of the related projects, you should submit a report to that project's JIRA issue tracker.

Your first step should be to search the existing set of open tickets for a similar report. If you find that someone else has already reported your problem, then you can upvote that report to increase its visibility.

If there is no existing report, submit a report following these steps:

  1. Sign in to Percona JIRA. You will need to create an account if you do not have one.
  2. Go to the Create Issue screen and select the relevant project.
  3. Fill in the fields of Summary, Description, Steps To Reproduce, and Affects Version to the best you can. If the bug corresponds to a crash, attach the stack trace from the logs.

An excellent resource is Elika Etemad's article on filing good bug reports..

As a general rule of thumb, please try to create bug reports that are:

  • Reproducible. Include steps to reproduce the problem.
  • Specific. Include as much detail as possible: which version, what environment, etc.
  • Unique. Do not duplicate existing tickets.
  • Scoped to a Single Bug. One bug per report.