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1 parent af5d92f commit d9b1b931fb28fbabf80ac7fe036b21835c442144 @wchristian wchristian committed Jan 15, 2012
Showing with 81 additions and 80 deletions.
  1. +2 −2 Changes
  2. +1 −1 MANIFEST.SKIP
  3. +2 −1 dist.ini
  4. +24 −24 lib/perlfaq1.pod
  5. +15 −15 lib/perlfaq2.pod
  6. +6 −6 lib/perlfaq3.pod
  7. +12 −12 lib/perlfaq4.pod
  8. +14 −14 lib/perlfaq9.pod
  9. +3 −3 lib/perlglossary.pod
  10. +2 −2 perlfaq.tt
View
4 Changes
@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@
* Update "How to contribute to the perlfaq"
5.01500301 Mon, 29 Aug 2011 11:08:17 +0200
- * Cause the 'perlfaq' package to be indexed by PAUSE so we can make use
+ * Cause the 'perlfaq' package to be indexed by PAUSE so we can make use
of its permission system.
5.015003 Fri, 26 Aug 2011 14:37:47 +0200
@@ -55,7 +55,7 @@
* Add a note on searching perlfaq (Matthew Horsfall).
5.015000 Fri, 08 Jul 2011 11:37:58 +0200
- * First stand-alone release to CPAN. This release is identical to
+ * First stand-alone release to CPAN. This release is identical to
the version of perlfaq included with the perl code as of 5.15.0.
-----
View
2 MANIFEST.SKIP
@@ -1,3 +1,3 @@
bin/create_question_list.pl
dist.ini
-perlfaq.tt
+perlfaq.tt
View
3 dist.ini
@@ -7,6 +7,7 @@ author = brian d foy <bdfoy@cpan.org>
author = Leo Lapworth <LLAP@cpan.org>
author = perlfaq-workers <perlfaq-workers@perl.org>
author = The Perl 5 Porters <perl5-porters@perl.org>
+author = Christian Walde <walde.christian@googlemail.com>
license = Perl_5
copyright_holder = Tom Christiansen, Nathan Torkington, and others
@@ -38,4 +39,4 @@ run = bin/create_question_list.pl
; authordep Template::Toolkit
; authordep HTML::TreeBuilder
; authordep Pod::Simple::XHTML
-; authordep Path::Class
+; authordep Path::Class
View
48 lib/perlfaq1.pod
@@ -10,20 +10,20 @@ about Perl.
=head2 What is Perl?
Perl is a high-level programming language with an eclectic heritage
-written by Larry Wall and a cast of thousands.
+written by Larry Wall and a cast of thousands.
Perl's process, file, and text manipulation facilities make it
particularly well-suited for tasks involving quick prototyping, system
utilities, software tools, system management tasks, database access,
graphical programming, networking, and web programming.
-Perl derives from the ubiquitous C programming language and to a
-lesser extent from sed, awk, the Unix shell, and many other tools
+Perl derives from the ubiquitous C programming language and to a
+lesser extent from sed, awk, the Unix shell, and many other tools
and languages.
These strengths make it especially popular with web developers
and system administrators. Mathematicians, geneticists, journalists,
-managers and many other people also use Perl.
+managers and many other people also use Perl.
=head2 Who supports Perl? Who develops it? Why is it free?
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ documentation you're reading now were all written by volunteers.
The core development team (known as the Perl Porters)
are a group of highly altruistic individuals committed to
producing better software for free than you could hope to purchase for
-money. You may snoop on pending developments via the
+money. You may snoop on pending developments via the
L<archives|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/>
or read the L<faq|http://dev.perl.org/perl5/docs/p5p-faq.html>,
or you can subscribe to the mailing list by sending
@@ -133,28 +133,28 @@ support.
The current major release of Perl is Perl 5, first released in
1994. It can run scripts from the previous major release, Perl 4
-(March 1991), but has significant differences.
+(March 1991), but has significant differences.
Perl 6 is a reinvention of Perl, it is a language in the same lineage but
-not compatible. The two are complementary, not mutually exclusive. Perl 6 is
-not meant to replace Perl 5, and vice versa. See L</"What is Perl 6?"> below
+not compatible. The two are complementary, not mutually exclusive. Perl 6 is
+not meant to replace Perl 5, and vice versa. See L</"What is Perl 6?"> below
to find out more.
See L<perlhist> for a history of Perl revisions.
=head2 What is Perl 6?
Perl 6 was I<originally> described as the community's rewrite of Perl 5.
-Development started in 2002; syntax and design work continue to this day.
-As the language has evolved, it has become clear that it is a separate
-language, incompatible with Perl 5 but in the same language family.
-
-Contrary to popular belief, Perl 6 and Perl 5 peacefully coexist with one
-another. Perl 6 has proven to be a fascinating source of ideas for those
-using Perl 5 (the L<Moose> object system is a well-known example). There is
-overlap in the communities, and this overlap fosters the tradition of sharing
-and borrowing that have been instrumental to Perl's success. The current
-leading implementation of Perl 6 is Rakudo, and you can learn more about
+Development started in 2002; syntax and design work continue to this day.
+As the language has evolved, it has become clear that it is a separate
+language, incompatible with Perl 5 but in the same language family.
+
+Contrary to popular belief, Perl 6 and Perl 5 peacefully coexist with one
+another. Perl 6 has proven to be a fascinating source of ideas for those
+using Perl 5 (the L<Moose> object system is a well-known example). There is
+overlap in the communities, and this overlap fosters the tradition of sharing
+and borrowing that have been instrumental to Perl's success. The current
+leading implementation of Perl 6 is Rakudo, and you can learn more about
it at L<http://rakudo.org>.
If you want to learn more about Perl 6, or have a desire to help in
@@ -203,13 +203,13 @@ discussed in Part 2.
=head2 How does Perl compare with other languages like Java, Python, REXX, Scheme, or Tcl?
-Perl can be used for almost any coding problem, even ones which require
+Perl can be used for almost any coding problem, even ones which require
integrating specialist C code for extra speed. As with any tool it can
be used well or badly. Perl has many strengths, and a few weaknesses,
-precisely which areas are good and bad is often a personal choice.
+precisely which areas are good and bad is often a personal choice.
-When choosing a language you should also be influenced by the
-L<resources|http://www.cpan.org/>, L<testing culture|http://www.cpantesters.org/>
+When choosing a language you should also be influenced by the
+L<resources|http://www.cpan.org/>, L<testing culture|http://www.cpantesters.org/>
and L<community|http://www.perl.org/community.html> which surrounds it.
For comparisons to a specific language it is often best to create
@@ -249,12 +249,12 @@ well), or you have an application language specifically designed for a
certain task (e.g. prolog, make).
If you find that you need to speed up a specific part of a Perl
-application (not something you often need) you may want to use C,
+application (not something you often need) you may want to use C,
but you can access this from your Perl code with L<perlxs>.
=head2 What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"?
-"Perl" is the name of the language. Only the "P" is capitalized.
+"Perl" is the name of the language. Only the "P" is capitalized.
The name of the interpreter (the program which runs the Perl script)
is "perl" with a lowercase "p".
View
30 lib/perlfaq2.pod
@@ -35,13 +35,13 @@ See L<CPAN Ports|http://www.cpan.org/ports/>
=head2 I don't have a C compiler. How can I build my own Perl interpreter?
-For Windows, use a binary version of Perl,
+For Windows, use a binary version of Perl,
L<Strawberry Perl|http://strawberryperl.com/> and
L<ActivePerl|http://www.activestate.com/activeperl> come with a
bundled C compiler.
-Otherwise if you really do want to build Perl, you need to get a
-binary version of C<gcc> for your system first. Use a search
+Otherwise if you really do want to build Perl, you need to get a
+binary version of C<gcc> for your system first. Use a search
engine to find out how to do this for your operating system.
=head2 I copied the Perl binary from one machine to another, but scripts don't work.
@@ -77,14 +77,14 @@ architecture.
CPAN stands for Comprehensive Perl Archive Network, a multi-gigabyte
archive replicated on hundreds of machines all over the world. CPAN
-contains tens of thousands of modules and extensions, source code
-and documentation, designed for I<everything> from commercial
+contains tens of thousands of modules and extensions, source code
+and documentation, designed for I<everything> from commercial
database interfaces to keyboard/screen control and running large web sites.
You can search CPAN on L<http://metacpan.org> or
L<http://search.cpan.org/>.
-The master web site for CPAN is L<http://www.cpan.org/>,
+The master web site for CPAN is L<http://www.cpan.org/>,
L<http://www.cpan.org/SITES.html> lists all mirrors.
See the CPAN FAQ at L<http://www.cpan.org/misc/cpan-faq.html> for answers
@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ which maintains the web site L<http://www.perl.org/> as a general
advocacy site for the Perl language. It uses the domain to provide
general support services to the Perl community, including the hosting
of mailing lists, web sites, and other services. There are also many
-other sub-domains for special topics like learning Perl and jobs in Perl,
+other sub-domains for special topics like learning Perl and jobs in Perl,
such as:
=over 4
@@ -143,10 +143,10 @@ such as:
=back
-L<Perl Mongers|http://www.pm.org/> uses the pm.org domain for services
-related to local Perl user groups, including the hosting of mailing lists
-and web sites. See the L<Perl Mongers web site|http://www.pm.org/> for more
-information about joining, starting, or requesting services for a
+L<Perl Mongers|http://www.pm.org/> uses the pm.org domain for services
+related to local Perl user groups, including the hosting of mailing lists
+and web sites. See the L<Perl Mongers web site|http://www.pm.org/> for more
+information about joining, starting, or requesting services for a
Perl user group.
CPAN, or the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network L<http://www.cpan.org/>,
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ Several unix/linux releated magazines frequently includes articles on Perl.
=head2 Which Perl blogs should I read?
L<Perl News|http://perlnews.org/> covers some of the major events in the Perl
-world, L<Perl Weekly|http://perlweekly.com/> is a weekly e-mail
+world, L<Perl Weekly|http://perlweekly.com/> is a weekly e-mail
(and RSS feed) of hand-picked Perl articles.
L<http://blogs.perl.org/> hosts many Perl blogs, there are also
@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ that you can grab and carefully read to your manager. It is distributed
in releases and comes in well-defined packages. There is a very large
and supportive user community and an extensive literature.
-If you still need commercial support
+If you still need commercial support
L<ActiveState|http://www.activestate.com/activeperl> offers
this.
@@ -216,8 +216,8 @@ information about your installation to include with your message, then
sends the message to the right place.
To determine if a module came with your version of Perl, you can
-install and use the L<Module::CoreList> module. It has the information
-about the modules (with their versions) included with each release
+install and use the L<Module::CoreList> module. It has the information
+about the modules (with their versions) included with each release
of Perl.
Every CPAN module has a bug tracker set up in RT, L<http://rt.cpan.org>.
View
12 lib/perlfaq3.pod
@@ -133,8 +133,8 @@ Have you read the appropriate manpages? Here's a brief index:
=item Various
-L<http://www.cpan.org/misc/olddoc/FMTEYEWTK.tgz>
-(not a man-page but still useful, a collection of various essays on
+L<http://www.cpan.org/misc/olddoc/FMTEYEWTK.tgz>
+(not a man-page but still useful, a collection of various essays on
Perl techniques)
=back
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@ evaluated. You can also examine the symbol table, get stack
backtraces, check variable values, set breakpoints, and other
operations typically found in symbolic debuggers.
-You can also use L<Devel::REPL> which is an interactive shell for Perl,
+You can also use L<Devel::REPL> which is an interactive shell for Perl,
commonly known as a REPL - Read, Evaluate, Print, Loop. It provides
various handy features.
@@ -315,8 +315,8 @@ for Perl programs.
=head2 Is there a pretty-printer (formatter) for Perl?
-L<Perl::Tidy> comes with a perl script L<perltidy> which indents and
-reformats Perl scripts to make them easier to read by trying to follow
+L<Perl::Tidy> comes with a perl script L<perltidy> which indents and
+reformats Perl scripts to make them easier to read by trying to follow
the rules of the L<perlstyle>. If you write Perl, or spend much time reading
Perl, you will probably find it useful.
@@ -906,7 +906,7 @@ you use. It can allow existing CGI scripts to enjoy this flexibility and
performance with minimal changes, or can be used along with modern Perl web
frameworks to make writing and deploying web services with Perl a breeze.
-These solutions can have far-reaching effects on your system and on the way you
+These solutions can have far-reaching effects on your system and on the way you
write your CGI programs, so investigate them with care.
See also
View
24 lib/perlfaq4.pod
@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ the entire list. So
push(@results, some_func($i));
}
-or even
+or even
push(@results, some_func($_)) for 5 .. 500_005;
@@ -370,15 +370,15 @@ who attempts to generate random numbers by deterministic means is, of
course, living in a state of sin."
Perl relies on the underlying system for the implementation of
-C<rand> and C<srand>; on some systems, the generated numbers are
-not random enough (especially on Windows : see
-L<http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=803632>).
+C<rand> and C<srand>; on some systems, the generated numbers are
+not random enough (especially on Windows : see
+L<http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=803632>).
Several CPAN modules in the C<Math> namespace implement better
-pseudorandom generators; see for example
-L<Math::Random::MT> ("Mersenne Twister", fast), or
-L<Math::TrulyRandom> (uses the imperfections in the system's
+pseudorandom generators; see for example
+L<Math::Random::MT> ("Mersenne Twister", fast), or
+L<Math::TrulyRandom> (uses the imperfections in the system's
timer to generate random numbers, which is rather slow).
-More algorithms for random numbers are described in
+More algorithms for random numbers are described in
"Numerical Recipes in C" at L<http://www.nr.com/>
=head2 How do I get a random number between X and Y?
@@ -724,13 +724,13 @@ and/or balanced expressions, see the so-called
L<< (?PARNO)|perlre/C<(?PARNO)> C<(?-PARNO)> C<(?+PARNO)> C<(?R)> C<(?0)> >>
construct (available since perl 5.10).
The CPAN module L<Regexp::Common> can help to build such
-regular expressions (see in particular
+regular expressions (see in particular
L<Regexp::Common::balanced> and L<Regexp::Common::delimited>).
More complex cases will require to write a parser, probably
using a parsing module from CPAN, like
-L<Regexp::Grammars>, L<Parse::RecDescent>, L<Parse::Yapp>,
-L<Text::Balanced>, or L<Marpa::XS>.
+L<Regexp::Grammars>, L<Parse::RecDescent>, L<Parse::Yapp>,
+L<Text::Balanced>, or L<Marpa::XS>.
=head2 How do I reverse a string?
@@ -2531,7 +2531,7 @@ L<Data::Diver> does for you:
=head2 How can I prevent addition of unwanted keys into a hash?
Since version 5.8.0, hashes can be I<restricted> to a fixed number
-of given keys. Methods for creating and dealing with restricted hashes
+of given keys. Methods for creating and dealing with restricted hashes
are exported by the L<Hash::Util> module.
=head1 Data: Misc
View
28 lib/perlfaq9.pod
@@ -9,14 +9,14 @@ sending and receiving email as well as general networking.
=head2 Should I use a web framework?
-Yes. If you are building a web site with any level of interactivity
+Yes. If you are building a web site with any level of interactivity
(forms / users / databases), you
will want to use a framework to make handling requests
and responses easier.
If there is no interactivity then you may still want
to look at using something like L<Template Toolkit|https://metacpan.org/module/Template>
-or L<Plack::Middleware::TemplateToolkit>
+or L<Plack::Middleware::TemplateToolkit>
so maintenance of your HTML files (and other assets) is easier.
=head2 Which web framework should I use?
@@ -51,28 +51,28 @@ the others.
=head2 What is Plack and PSGI?
L<PSGI> is the Perl Web Server Gateway Interface Specification, it is
-a standard that many Perl web frameworks use, you should not need to
+a standard that many Perl web frameworks use, you should not need to
understand it to build a web site, the part you might want to use is L<Plack>.
-L<Plack> is a set of tools for using the PSGI stack. It contains
-L<middleware|https://metacpan.org/search?q=plack%3A%3Amiddleware>
-components, a reference server and utilities for Web application frameworks.
+L<Plack> is a set of tools for using the PSGI stack. It contains
+L<middleware|https://metacpan.org/search?q=plack%3A%3Amiddleware>
+components, a reference server and utilities for Web application frameworks.
Plack is like Ruby's Rack or Python's Paste for WSGI.
You could build a web site using L<Plack> and your own code,
-but for anything other than a very basic web site, using a web framework
+but for anything other than a very basic web site, using a web framework
(that uses L<Plack>) is a better option.
=head2 How do I remove HTML from a string?
-Use L<HTML::Strip>, or L<HTML::FormatText> which not only removes HTML
-but also attempts to do a little simple formatting of the resulting
+Use L<HTML::Strip>, or L<HTML::FormatText> which not only removes HTML
+but also attempts to do a little simple formatting of the resulting
plain text.
=head2 How do I extract URLs?
-L<HTML::SimpleLinkExtor> will extract URLs from HTML, it handles anchors,
-images, objects, frames, and many other tags that can contain a URL.
+L<HTML::SimpleLinkExtor> will extract URLs from HTML, it handles anchors,
+images, objects, frames, and many other tags that can contain a URL.
If you need anything more complex, you can create your own subclass of
L<HTML::LinkExtor> or L<HTML::Parser>. You might even use
L<HTML::SimpleLinkExtor> as an example for something specifically
@@ -136,7 +136,7 @@ Most of the time you should not need to do this as
your web framework, or if you are making a request,
the L<LWP> or other module would handle it for you.
-To encode a string yourself, use the L<URI::Escape> module. The C<uri_escape>
+To encode a string yourself, use the L<URI::Escape> module. The C<uri_escape>
function returns the escaped string:
my $original = "Colon : Hash # Percent %";
@@ -161,7 +161,7 @@ using the L<Catalyst> framework it would be:
$c->res->redirect($url);
$c->detach();
-
+
If you are using Plack (which most frameworks do), then
L<Plack::Middleware::Rewrite> is worth looking at if you
are migrating from Apache or have URL's you want to always
@@ -310,7 +310,7 @@ uses SSL and can authenticate to the server via SASL.
This is like the SMTP transport, but uses TLS security. You can
authenticate with this module as well, using any mechanisms your server
-supports after STARTTLS.
+supports after STARTTLS.
=back
View
6 lib/perlglossary.pod
@@ -3390,9 +3390,9 @@ in the three-argument form of L<open|perlfunc/open>.
=item XS
-A language to extend Perl with L<C> and C++. XS is an interface description
-file format used to create an extension interface between
-Perl and C code (or a C library) which one wishes to use with Perl.
+A language to extend Perl with L<C> and C++. XS is an interface description
+file format used to create an extension interface between
+Perl and C code (or a C library) which one wishes to use with Perl.
See L<perlxs> for the exact explanation or read the L<perlxstut>
tutorial.
View
4 perlfaq.tt
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ your suggestion create an issue or pull request against
L<https://github.com/perl-doc-cats/perlfaq>.
Once approved, changes are merged into L<https://github.com/tpf/perlfaq>, the
-repository which drives L<http://learn.perl.org/faq/>, and they are
+repository which drives L<http://learn.perl.org/faq/>, and they are
distributed with the next Perl 5 release.
=head2 What if my question isn't answered in the FAQ?
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ Try the resources in L<perlfaq2>.
Tom Christiansen wrote the original perlfaq then expanded it with the
help of Nat Torkington. brian d foy substantialy edited and expanded
-the perlfaq. perlfaq-workers and others have also supplied feedback,
+the perlfaq. perlfaq-workers and others have also supplied feedback,
patches and corrections over the years.
=head1 AUTHOR AND COPYRIGHT

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