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incorporate fixes from Pm; answer Pm's questions

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1 parent f7dc274 commit b0708ef823cc5bdda7947efbb692b492946f06fd @perlpilot perlpilot committed Jul 27, 2010
Showing with 16 additions and 8 deletions.
  1. +9 −0 docs/review-notes.txt
  2. +7 −8 src/basics.pod
@@ -2,15 +2,24 @@ Pm-1: (basics) The first example uses C<.split> (e.g. to get the list
of names), but in Perl 6 the canonical way to grab a list
of words is via C<.comb>. Should we switch?
+perlpilot: I don't think so. C<.comb> takes a regex to describe
+ what you want and it's too soon and potentially
+ confusing to bring those up.
+
Pm-2: (basics) Footnote 1 -- I'd reword as "Unlike in Perl 5, in Perl 6
the sigil does not change when accessing an array or hash
using C<[ ]> or C<{ }>. This is called I<sigil invariance>."
+perlpilot: reworded mostly the same.
+
Pm-3: (basics) I know it's a bit early to talk about Junctions, but
for the answer to problem #2 it might be better to say
unless all($p1, $p2) ~~ @names { ... }
+perlpilot: Definitely not. We don't talk about Junctions B<at all> in
+ the book yet :)
+
Pm-4: (operators) The &infix:<,> operator doesn't construct a C<List>,
and C<List>s are no longer immutable.
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@@ -160,14 +160,13 @@ an C<Array>. Arrays store ordered lists.
X<hash>
-These two lines of code declare two hashes. The C<%> sigil marks each variable
-as a C<Hash>. A C<Hash> is an unordered
-collection of pairs of keys and values. Other programming languages call that a
-I<hash table>, I<dictionary>, or I<map>. You can query a hash table for the
-value that corresponds to a certain C<$key> with C<%hash{$key}>N<
-Perl 5 programmers will notice that in Perl 6 the sigil stays the same
-and does not change upon indexing with C<[ ]> or C<{ }>. This
-is referred to as I<M<sigil invariance>>.>.
+These two lines of code declare two hashes. The c<%> sigil marks each
+variable as a C<Hash>. A C<Hash> is an unordered collection of pairs of
+keys and values. Other programming languages call that a I<hash table>,
+I<dictionary>, or I<map>. You can query a hash table for the value that
+corresponds to a certain C<$key> with C<%hash{$key}>N<Unlike Perl 5, in
+Perl 6 the sigil does not change when accessing an array or hash with
+C<[ ]> or C<{ }>. This is called I<M<sigil invariance>>.>.
In the score counting program, C<%matches> stores the number of matches each
player has won. C<%sets> stores the number of sets each player has won.

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