Permalink
Browse files

Normalize use of X<>, L<>, and C<> somewhat

In particular, change some X<foo> to L<foo>.

Not all L<foo> are generating working links yet; this is something for
future commits to handle. When a term is used frequently in a region of
text, the first occurrance is usually linked (with L<foo>), and later
ones are marked as code (C<foo>) or emphasized (I<foo>) as appropriate.
  • Loading branch information...
1 parent 9ee37cf commit 45793f0203c4174dca0412d82b119ade62bd0aa9 @softmoth softmoth committed Aug 14, 2012
Showing with 21 additions and 22 deletions.
  1. +1 −1 lib/Instant.pod
  2. +1 −1 lib/List.pod
  3. +1 −1 lib/Pair.pod
  4. +1 −1 lib/Routine.pod
  5. +7 −7 lib/Str.pod
  6. +2 −2 lib/Version.pod
  7. +1 −1 lib/objects.pod
  8. +5 −6 lib/operators.pod
  9. +2 −2 lib/variables.pod
View
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
An C<Instant> is a particular moment in time measured in atomic seconds, with
fractions. It is not tied to or aware of any epoch.
-An C<Instant> can be used to create a C<DateTime> object set to that
+An C<Instant> can be used to create a L<DateTime> object set to that
C<Instant>. The pseudo-constant C<now> returns the current time as an
C<Instant>.
View
@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ stop at the point where the infinity is detected.
Returns a list with the same elements in reverse order.
Note that C<reverse> always refers to reversing elements of a list;
-to reverse the characters in a string, use X<flip>.
+to reverse the characters in a string, use L<flip>.
=head2 rotate
View
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ parts of the C<Pair> formatted. Here's an example:
say $pair.fmt("%s is %.3f AU away from the sun")
# Prints "Earth is 1.000 AU away from the sun"
-For more about format strings, see X<sprintf>.
+For more about format strings, see L<sprintf>.
=head2 kv
View
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
class Routine is Block { }
-A I<Routine> is a code object meant for larger unities of code than L<Block>.
+A C<Routine> is a code object meant for larger unities of code than L<Block>.
Routine is the common superclass for L<Sub> and L<Method>, the two primary
code objects for code reuse.
View
@@ -86,7 +86,7 @@ case
Performs a Unicode titlecase operation on the first character of
each word of the string (as defined by a regex C<«> boundary),
and forces the rest of the letters through a filter that defaults
-to C<lc>. After this operation, if any exceptions are supplied and
+to L<lc>. After this operation, if any exceptions are supplied and
if the word is found in the set of exceptions, the first character is also
forced through the filter. Note that the exceptions must be spelled with
an initial titlecase, such as "By" or "And", to produce "by" or "and".
@@ -99,11 +99,11 @@ Perl 6 does not have a C<lcfirst> function.
=head2 ucfirst
-Perl 6 does not have a C<ucfirst> function. See X<tc>.
+Perl 6 does not have a C<ucfirst> function. See L<tc>.
=head2 length
-Perl 6 does not have a C<length> function. See X<chars> or X<elems>.
+Perl 6 does not have a C<length> function. See L<chars> or L<elems>.
=head2 chars
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ Returns the number of characters in the string in the current
multi method encode(Str:D: $encoding = $?ENC, $nf = $?NF) returns Buf
-Returns a C<Buf> which represents the original string in the given encoding
+Returns a L<Buf> which represents the original string in the given encoding
and normal form. The actual return type is as specific as possible, so
C<$str.encode('UTF-8')> returns a C<utf8> object,
C<$str.encode('ISO-8859-1')> a C<buf8>.
@@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ If the named parameter C<:all> is passed, the matches from C<$delimiter>
are included in the result list.
Note that unlike in Perl 5, empty chunks are not removed from the result list.
-If you want that behavior, consider using C<Str.comb> instead.
+If you want that behavior, consider using L<comb> instead.
=head2 comb
@@ -167,7 +167,7 @@ If you want that behavior, consider using C<Str.comb> instead.
multi method comb(Str:D $input: Regex:D $matcher, $limit = Inf, Bool :$match)
Searches for C<$matcher> in C<$input> and returns a list of all matches
-(as C<Str> by default, or as C<Match> if C<$match> is True), limited to at most
+(as C<Str> by default, or as L<Match> if C<$match> is True), limited to at most
C<$limit> matches.
If no matcher is supplied, a list of characters in the string
@@ -303,7 +303,7 @@ character can be uniquely classified as belonging to one range of characters.
Returns the string decremented by one.
String decrementing is "magical" just like string increment (see
-C<Str.succ>). It fails on underflow
+L<succ>). It fails on underflow
'b0'.pred # a9
'a0'.pred # Failure
View
@@ -6,14 +6,14 @@ Version objects identify version of software components (and potentially other
entities). Perl 6 uses them internally for versioning modules.
A version consists of several parts, which are visually represented by joining
-them with a dot. A version part is usually an integer, a string like I<alpha>,
+them with a dot. A version part is usually an integer, a string like C<alpha>,
or a L<Whatever>-star C<*>. The latter is used to indicate that any version
part is acceptable in another version that is compared to the current one.
say v1.0.1 ~~ v.1.*; # True
Version literals can only contain numeric and L<Whatever> parts. They start
-with a lowe-case C<v>, and are followed by at least one part. Multiple parts
+with a lower-case C<v>, and are followed by at least one part. Multiple parts
are separate with a dot C<.>. A trailing C<+> indicates that higher versions
are OK in comparisons:
View
@@ -209,7 +209,7 @@ Private methods are not inherited to subclasses.
=head2 Submethods
A submethod is public method that is not inherited to subclasses. The name
-stems from the fact that they are sematically similar to subroutines.
+stems from the fact that they are semantically similar to subroutines.
Submethods are useful for object construction and destruction tasks, as well
as for tasks that are so specific to a certain type that subtypes must
View
@@ -59,8 +59,7 @@ for binary operators are interpreted as follows:
=end table
-For unaries this is interpreted as:
-
+For unary operators this is interpreted as:
=begin table
@@ -294,7 +293,7 @@ same as C<< prefix:<!> >>.
I<upto> operator.
-Coerces the argument to C<Numeric>, and generates a range from 0 up to (but
+Coerces the argument to L<Numeric>, and generates a range from 0 up to (but
excluding) the argument.
say ^5; # 0..^5
@@ -337,7 +336,7 @@ Generally the following identity holds:
multi sub infix:<%%>($a, $b) returns Bool:D
-Divisibility operator. Returns C<True> if L<$a % $b == 0>.
+Divisibility operator. Returns C<True> if C<$a % $b == 0>.
=head2 infix mod
@@ -350,7 +349,7 @@ Integer modulo operator. Returns the remainder of an integer modulo operation.
multi sub infix:<+&>($a, $b) returns Int:D
Numeric bitwise I<AND>. Coerces both arguments to L<Int> and does a bitwise
-L<AND> operation assuming two's complement.
+I<AND> operation assuming two's complement.
=head2 infix +<
@@ -775,7 +774,7 @@ For value types, C<===> behaves like C<eqv>:
say 1 === 1.0; # False
C<===> uses the L<WHICH> method to obtain the object identity, so all value
-types must override method L<WHICH>.
+types must override method C<WHICH>.
=head2 infix =:=
View
@@ -3,8 +3,8 @@
=TITLE Perl 6 variables
Variable names start with a special character called a I<sigil>, followed
-optionally by a second special character named C<twigil>, and then an
-identifer.
+optionally by a second special character named I<twigil>, and then an
+I<identifer>.
=head1 Sigils

0 comments on commit 45793f0

Please sign in to comment.