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Merge branch 'master' of github.com:perl6/specs

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commit 41ec3250ff5ab59199a7ae0ffbde47b246040114 2 parents b35224c + ffef865
Larry Wall TimToady authored
Showing with 17 additions and 11 deletions.
  1. +14 −9 S05-regex.pod
  2. +3 −2 S29-functions.pod
23 S05-regex.pod
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@@ -1957,10 +1957,10 @@ is equivalent to:
except that the scan for "C<foo>" can be done in the forward direction,
while a lookbehind assertion would presumably scan for C<\d+> and then
match "C<foo>" backwards. The use of C<< <(...)> >> affects only the
-positions of the beginning and ending of the match, and anything calculated based on those positions. For instance, after the match above, C<$()> contains
-only the digits matched, and C<$/.to> is pointing to after the digits.
-Other captures (named or numbered) are unaffected and may be accessed
-through C<$/>.
+positions of the beginning and ending of the match, and anything calculated
+based on those positions. For instance, after the match above, C<$()> contains
+only the digits matched, and C<$/.to> is pointing to after the digits. Other
+captures (named or numbered) are unaffected and may be accessed through C<$/>.
These tokens are considered declarative, but may force backtracking behavior.
@@ -2025,7 +2025,12 @@ Match a single "graphical" character.
=item * cntrl
X<cntrl>X<< <cntrl> >>
-Match a single "control" character. A control character is usually one that doesn't produce output as such but instead controls the terminal somehow: for example newline and backspace are control characters. All characters with ord() less than 32 are usually classified as control characters (assuming ASCII, the ISO Latin character sets, and Unicode), as is the character with the ord() value of 127 (DEL ).
+Match a single "control" character. A control character is usually one that
+doesn't produce output as such but instead controls the terminal somehow: for
+example newline and backspace are control characters. All characters with ord()
+less than 32 are usually classified as control characters (assuming ASCII, the
+ISO Latin character sets, and Unicode), as is the character with the ord() value
+of 127 (DEL).
=item * punct
X<punct>X<< <punct> >>
@@ -4117,10 +4122,10 @@ string that the regex skipped over in order to find later matches).
Subcaptures are returned as a multidimensional list, which the user can
choose to process in either of two ways. If you refer to
-C<@().flat> (or just use C<@()> in a flat list context), the multidimensionality is ignored and all the matches are returned
-flattened (but still lazily). If you refer to C<lol()>, you can
-get each individual sublist as a C<Parcel> object.
-As with any multidimensional list, each sublist can be lazy separately.
+C<@().flat> (or just use C<@()> in a flat list context), the multidimensionality
+is ignored and all the matches are returned flattened (but still lazily). If
+you refer to C<lol()>, you can get each individual sublist as a C<Parcel>
+object. As with any multidimensional list, each sublist can be lazy separately.
=back
5 S29-functions.pod
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@@ -418,8 +418,9 @@ to a printer. C<:-)>
Interprets string as a number, with a default
hexadecimal/octal/binary/decimal radix. Any radix prefix (0b, 0d, 0x, 0o)
-mentioned inside the string will override this operator (this statement is true: 10 == :8("0d10")), except 0b and 0d will be interpreted
-as hex digits by :16 (C<hex("0d10") == :16 "0d10">). C<fail>s on failure.
+mentioned inside the string will override this operator (this statement is true:
+10 == :8("0d10")), except 0b and 0d will be interpreted as hex digits by :16
+(C<hex("0d10") == :16 "0d10">). C<fail>s on failure.
These aren't really functions, syntactically, but adverbial forms that
just happen to allow a parenthesize argument. But more typically you'll
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