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nuked trunk/pod, moved everything up a level.

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1 parent 6e01bb2 commit 3c25cdc53e3186ac1931d04d6448613f3920a1d8 jhannah committed Apr 30, 2006
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-=head1 Perl Mongers Contact Information
-
-Please use the email addresses below to contact Perl Mongers
-
-=head2 user_groups@pm.org
-
-Any general queries about Perl Mongers. Anything that doesn't fit into
-any of the other categories.
-
-=head2 tech@pm.org
-
-Any queries regarding the internet services (i.e. web space and mailing
-lists) provided by Perl Mongers.
-
-=head2 dns@pm.org
-
-Any queries about the DNS services provided by Perl Mongers.
-
-=head2 webmaster@pm.org
-
-Any comments or suggestions about the web site.
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163 pod/faq.pod
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-=head1 Perl Monger Frequently Asked Questions
-
-Please send any suggestions or corrections to user_groups@pm.org
-
-=head2 General Questions
-
-=head3 What is Perl Mongers?
-
-Perl Mongers is a loose association of international Perl User Groups.
-Individual groups vary a great deal in the details of what they actually
-do, but in most cases they are groups of Perl users in a particular
-location who get together periodically to discuss Perl and related
-topics.
-
-Perl Mongers is also the name of the organisation that oversees and
-co-ordinates the local groups. It also provides internet services to
-these groups. Perl Mongers was originally set up as a not-for-profit
-organisation in the state of New York, but in July 2001 it joined with
-Yet Another Society.
-
-=head3 Is there a Perl Mongers group in my area?
-
-The list of currently established groups is here [NOTE: Add link]
-
-=head3 How do I start a Perl Mongers group?
-
-Simply find some Perl hackers in your area and ask them if they'd be
-interested in starting a group.
-
-Experience shows that having a mailing list and a web site help to
-drum up interest in your new group. Almost certainly you'll already
-have access to servers to set them up on, but if you need help with
-that, we will gladly supply both web space and a mailing list.
-
-The only other thing to do is to let us know about your new group
-so that we can add you to the list of established groups
-[NOTE: Add link].
-
-=head3 Can you provide people to speak at our meetings?
-
-Perl Mongers can't actually provide speakers for you. Who do, however,
-maintain a list [NOTE: Add link] of well-known people from the Perl
-community who have indicated that they are happy to speak to Perl
-Monger groups when they are passing thru the area.
-
-=head2 Internet Services
-
-=head3 What Internet services can Perl Mongers provide?
-
-If your group does not have a local server that you can use to host
-a mailing list and a web site then we can host it for you on our server.
-If you want to host your mailing list and web site locally then we can
-provide a pm.org domain that points to your server.
-
-To set up your web space and mailing list on our server, please email
-tech@pm.org.
-
-To set up a pm.org domain pointing at your server, please email dns@pm.org.
-Please ensure you include the following information:
-
-=over 4
-
-=item *
-
-new numbers or names for A or CNAME records
-
-=item *
-
-new numbers and priorities for MX records
-
-=back
-
-=head3 Why does it sometimes take awhile to get Perl Mongers services set up
-for my group?
-
-Perl Mongers is an all volunteer organization, and almost all of our system
-administrators have very demanding commitments outside of Perl Mongers. We
-do things as quickly as is reasonable considering all of our other
-commitments. Additionally, there's nothing stopping you from operating
-your group while you are waiting for your Perl Mongers services.
-
-=head3 How do I set up my group's web site on the Perl Monger server?
-
-You'll be given a username on the server. You can use C<ssh> to log in
-to the server (we don't allow C<telnet> or C<ftp> connections).
-
-Your group's web directory is in your login directory. It's called www_docs.
-Your log files are in www_logs.
-
-You also get mod_perl and full cgi access. these haven't been tested
-extensively, so let us know if you run into problems. If you want something
-we don't offer, just ask. The web server configuration files are in
-/opt/apache/gocho.pm.org/80/conf if you want to see how things are set up.
-
-There is no explicit cgi-bin directory. CGI programs are recognised by the
-extension .cgi.
-
-Server side includes are turned on for files ending with the extension
-.shtml.
-
-We don't implement a quota system, but people using the server as an MP3
-library (or anything with similar space or bandwidth usage) I<will> be
-noticed - and removed from the system.
-
-=head3 How can I administer my mailing list
-
-Some older lists are still run using C<majordomo>. You can administer
-these lists using the standard C<majordomo> email interface. We also
-have a web interface at L<http://www.pm.org/majorcool/?module=modify>.
-
-All new lists (and many of the older ones) are run using C<mailman>.
-Users can access their C<mailman> configuration at
-L<http://www.pm.org/mailman/listinfo/I<E<gt>list nameE<lt>>. List admins
-can access the list administration page at
-L<http://www.pm.org/mailman/admin/I<E<gt>list nameE<lt>>>.
-
-=head3 You use C<mailman> on a Perl web site? Are you a secret Python
-programmer?
-
-C<mailman> is better than C<majordomo>. Deal with it.
-
-=head2 The Perl Mongers logo
-
-=head3 Can I make my own camel logo?
-
-The camel used in association with the Perl language is a trademark of
-O'Reilly & Associates. Thus, you would have to ask them, although we can
-help you go through that process if you need to. Be warned that this can be
-a lengthy process and that only the most professionally designed logos are
-likely to pass muster with O'Reilly. You should seriously consider using the
-existing Perl Mongers logo which was chosen after almost a year of effort and
-many trips back to the ad agency.
-
-=head3 Can I use the Perl Mongers logo?
-
-Perl Mongers groups can use the logo that appears on this page on their own
-web page as long as they include the following text somewhere (able to be
-clearly seen) on the page:
-
-"The use of the camel image in association with the Perl language is a
-trademark of O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. Used with permission."
-
-Use of the Perl Mongers logo in other media is evaluated on a case by case
-basis since Perl Mongers is legally liable for its misuse. Our license with
-O'Reilly & Associates requires us to report misuse of the Camel logo with the
-Perl Mongers name. Help us not get in trouble.
-
-=head3 Can I change the Perl Mongers logo's color, size, and so on?
-
-You can only use the image as you find it. Additionally, you cannot
-incorporate it into a larger logo or make it look like it is part of a larger
-graphic. If you have other needs, we might be able to work something out. We
-will, however, be less willing to work out special situations if we have to
-ask you to remove an improperly used logo before you ask us. We are legally
-liable for misuse of the logo.
-
-=head3 Who created the logo?
-
-Smith & Jones Advertising and Marketing developed the corporate image and
-handles all of Perl Mongers logo placement needs. The camel image is used
-with the permission of O'Reilly & Associates.
-
-=cut
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35 pod/news.pod
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-=head1 Perl Monger News
-
-Latest news items from Perl Monger groups around the world.
-
-If you have an story that you'd like us to feature here, then
-please let us know.
-
-=head2 Perl Monger T-Shirts at YAPC::Europe
-
-19 Aug 2002
-
-If you are going to YAPC::Europe and your local Perl Monger group
-has its own t-shirt, please consider donating one to the auction
-that will happen on the final day.
-
-=head2 Damian Conway to speak in London
-
-7 Aug 2002
-
-Damian Conway will be speaking at two special london.pm meetings
-in August. The meetings will be at the Conway Hall on Tueday 27th
-(Life, the Universe and Everything) and Thursday 29th August (Perl
-6 Perspective).
-
-For more details see L<http://london.pm.org/meetings/>.
-
-=head2 New Chief Perl Monger
-
-6 Aug 2002
-
-Dave Cross has been appointed the new Perl Mongers User Groups
-Co-ordinator. Dave will be acting as liason between The Perl
-Foundation and the 500 local Perl Monger groups.
-
-=cut
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249 pod/success.pod
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-=head1 How to run a successful Perl Mongers Group
-
-=head2 Abstract
-
-Every Perl Mongers Group is slightly different. Some are purely social
-groups, others are purely technical, most are somewhere inbetween. Some
-have hundreds of members, others have only a few. There are few hard and
-fast rules on how to make your Perl Mongers group a success. In this article,
-Dave Cross shares some of the knowledge he picked up in his three years as
-leader of london.pm.
-
-=head2 Finding Members
-
-One of the biggest problems to overcome is that of finding new members.
-Once your group becomes well known then new members will find you (for
-example, a search for "london perl" in Google returns the london.pm
-web site as the first link), but when you're first setting up a group
-it can be difficult to get news of your existance out to people who might
-be interested in it.
-
-I recommend a two pronged approach. You can advertise in places where
-Perl hackers hang out in the hope that some of them will be in your area
-and you can advertise in places where geeks in your area hang out in the
-hope that some of them will be Perl hackers.
-
-The first alternative is better catered for now than it was when london.pm
-started four years ago. I think I pretty much just posted a message to
-comp.lang.perl.misc, but these days you would also be able to put
-announcements on use.perl.org and Perlmonks. You might also have other local
-Perl Monger groups who don't mind you posting an announcement to their
-mailing list (of course you should check with them first).
-
-For the second alternative you could look at other local geek user groups.
-Do you have a local Linux User Group (or, perhaps *BSD)? There are many
-benefits to setting up links with these kinds of groups. As an extension
-to this idea, you might try to get small news items in the kinds of
-magazines that Perl people read. As an extreme example of this, I once
-managed to get london.pm mentioned in the IT section of The Guardian
-(a national newspaper). The hits on our web site rocketed that day.
-
-Another alternative that becomes a possibility when you have a few
-members is to look for more Perl users in the companies where your
-existing member swork. Maybe they have some kind of internal bulletin
-board where people could post messages advertising your group.
-
-=head2 The Mailing List
-
-Once you have a few members, it's important to get a mailing list up
-and running as soon as possible. This will then be the major line of
-communication between you and your members.
-
-The tone and content of your mailing list is obvously up to you and
-your group to decide, but, in my experience, groups with a chatty social
-mailing list tend to be more successful than ones who insist on no
-off-topic messages to the list.
-
-On the london.pm list discussion is always pretty wide ranging. We
-discuss options for meeting venues, latest Perl news, various other
-geek stuff... oh, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. A good sign that your
-mailing list is being successful is when people live nowhere near your
-group start posting because your list is such an interesting place to
-hang out.
-
-It's also up to you just how authoritarian you want to be about posting
-formats. You're bound to have someone on the list who posts in a format
-that offends others. This may take the form of HTML emails, top posting,
-oversized .sigs or any of a number of other heinous crimes. My personal
-feeling is that the Perl Community can sometimes be a bit over-zealous
-in flaming people over these things so I recommend a gentle pointer to
-the guidelines rather than a massive flaming. At least for the first
-and second offences.
-
-Also, you don't have to be limited to just one mailing list. In London,
-some people wanted to get the information about the next meeting date
-and venue, but weren't so interested in the genreal chat. To deal with
-that we set up a separate announcement list. I know that other groups
-have set up mailing lists where recruiters can post job requirements and
-only people who are currently looking for work need see them.
-
-=head2 A Web Site
-
-A website is a very useful tool for advertising your existance,
-particularly if you can get it listed on popular search engines.
-
-But a web site can be a two-edged sword. If the content on a web
-site is out of date, then visitors will think that your group no
-longer exists. The best example of this is having the date of your
-next meeting on the front page of your site. If this date is a year
-in the past then it's not a great advertisment for your group.
-
-So bearing in mind the fact that you need to keep your content fresh,
-here are some ideas of things to put on your web site.
-
-=head3 Forthcoming Meetings
-
-Don't just stop at the date of the next meeting. List dates for the
-next three months. Of course this rather relies on you being organised
-enough to know what will be going on three months time.
-
-=head3 Meeting Reports
-
-Tell people how good your meetings are. Better still, show them. Have
-photos of meetings on the site. If you have technical meetings, have
-links to the slides from the talks - after a few months that can build
-up into a useful archive.
-
-=head3 Book Reviews
-
-Many publishers produce Perl books. And most of them will give your
-group as long as you promise to write a review for them. Putting the
-review on a web site will make them I<very> happy.
-
-It's an interesting feature of the publishing industry that the more
-books you review, the more you'll be sent to review.
-
-=head3 CPAN Modules and other Projects
-
-Do your members have useful modules on CPAN? Or are they involved in
-other Perl projects? Have a list of these on the web site.
-
-=head3 Mailing List Archives
-
-This is something to discuss with your members as some people don't
-feel happy about having mailing discussions archived on a public site.
-But it can be useful to have a full archive available - even if it's
-password protected.
-
-=head3 RSS Feeds
-
-A great way to get frequently changing content is to take RSS feeds
-from other sites. For example you can get a list of the latest
-stories from use.perl.org from L<http://use.perl.org/useperl.rdf> and
-a list of the most recent CPAN uploads from
-L<http://search.cpan.org/recent.rdf>. Grabbing these once a day and
-passing the contents through a piece of XML::RSS goodness will ensure
-that you have new content every day.
-
-=head2 Meetings
-
-Meetings are at the heart of most Perl Monger groups. It's all very
-well communicating by email or IRC all day, but you can't beat a face
-to fae meeting. How, where and when you organise your meetings is of
-course completely up to you, but here are some ideas.
-
-=head3 Schedule
-
-Ever since london.pm has existed it has had well-defined and
-well-publicised algorithms for calculating the date of the meeting.
-The immediate advantage of this is that you don't get involved in
-monthly discussions as to when the next meeting will be. Everyone
-knows when it will be and plan the rest of their social life around
-that fact. A side benefit of having such an algorithm is that you can
-write a program that will display forthcoming dates on your web site.
-
-When setting up the algorithm for calculating the meeting dates, it's
-worth finding out the dates used by other local geek groups and
-avoiding those. You really don't want to have your meetings on the same
-night as the local Linux User Group (unless you want a joint meeting).
-
-Having established a schedule, it's also important to be flexible.
-Occasionally there will reasons to have meetings on other dates (perhaps
-someone is visiting from out of town and you'd like to meet them or
-they'd like to give you a talk). In these cases I'd recommend not
-moving already planned meetings, but adding extra (london.pm call them
-"emergency") meetings.
-
-=head3 Social Meetings
-
-Not all groups have social meetings and those that do take a number of
-different forms. The most popular seem to be meeting in a local bar
-or pub, meeting in a local restaurant, and meeting at a members house.
-Often groups will combine these options - a bar followed by a restaurant
-seems a particularly popular choice.
-
-One important thing to bear in mind at social meetings is how new
-members are greeted. You need to ensure that a) your group is easy to
-find and b) welcoming to newcomers. Techniques for ensuring that
-people can find you normally involve having something "perlish" on
-your table. This can vary from Perl books to stuffed camels. Making
-sure that newcomers are welcome can be a bit trickier. The best option
-is probably to ask a few of the more gregarious members of the group
-to be on the lookout for new faces lurking nervously at the edge of
-the group. Another option might be to have a point in the evening where
-everyone takes introduces themselves to the group. Having everyone
-wearing name badges is probably going too far.
-
-One good idea if your group is big enough is to see if you can book
-a private function room in the bar. Many venues will do that for free
-if you guarantee that you'll spend a certain sum of money. That makes you
-much easier to find.
-
-=head3 Technical Meetings
-
-Some groups start out just holding technical meetings. Others (like
-london.pm) have added them later on. There are some very obvious
-requirements for a technical meeting (a venue and at least one speaker)
-but some other things sometimes get forgotten (do you need internet
-access or a projector?)
-
-Finding a venue often seems to be the hardest part of organising a
-technical meeting. Your best option is to ask members if any of them
-are working for a company how will lend you a room for a night. You'll
-need a rough idea of the numbers of people you'll be expecting as it
-can be a bit of a problem trying to cram 40 people into a room that was
-meant for 20. Another option would be to hire a room for the night.
-For example, when Damian Conway comes to London, we hire a room in the
-(appropriately named) Conway Hall. In that case you can either ask
-members for donations to cover the costs or you can charge admission.
-
-Finding speakers usually isn't such a problem. You will usually find
-members of your group who are very happy to share their latest ideas
-with others. Sometimes people are nervous about doing it the first
-time, but they soon get the hang of it. Maybe you have members who
-have already given talks at Perl conferences (or maybe they'd like the
-chance to practise ones they are I<about> to give at a conference).
-
-Another good source of speakers is visiting Perl gurus. Most of the
-"names" in the Perl community will be only too happy to speak to
-local Perl Monger groups if they're passing through your town.
-
-A good way to encourage people to speak is to run "lightning talks".
-These were invented by Mark Jason Dominus for the first YAPC
-conference in Pittsburgh. They are talks that only last five minutes.
-This is plenty of time to give an introduction to all but the most
-complex of topics and it's short enough that no-one can be really
-scared about talking for that long.
-
-When planning the schedule for a technical meeting you need to
-take into account how early most of your members can get to the
-venue. There's no point in starting before most of your audience
-can arrive. You also probably don't want to go on for much more than
-two hours (unless you have something I<really> interesting to
-discuss). I like to have four or five lightning talks and two or
-three longer talks (20-30 minutes). Don't forget to have a 15 or
-20 minute break in the middle of the evening.
-
-=head2 Over To You
-
-And that (as far as I can tell) is how london.pm became one of the
-biggest and most successful Perl Monger groups. I'm aware that my
-experience is very UK-specific, so if there are any more
-international tips, then I'd love to hear them.
-
-What did you do to make your group successful? Alternatively, was there
-anything that I<didn't> work? Please let me know by emailing me at
-user_groups@pm.org. I'll publish any good advice I get in an update
-to this article.
-
-=cut
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0 perlmongers/src/groups/continent.html → src/groups/continent.html
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