My Project Euler solutions. Disclaimer: they're not very good.
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README

Sometimes I'll play with Project Euler ( http://projecteuler.net/ ) as a
way to learn languages, gauge relative speed, kick-start my brain for
the day, or learn a thing about number theory.  Consequently, there are
solutions for a large number of languages.

Here are the solutions, there aren't that many, and they're not that
good.  Some of them benchmark themselves, and some would be happier if
you typed 'time' before them.  Most of them are documented.  All of them
run in reasonable amounts of time (under a few seconds on semi-modern
hardware, usually under a second) except my Pez solutions for #145 and
#204, both of which (shamefully) take several minutes, and a novelty
solution in bash which takes about three hours or so.  The files are all
named consistently: $language/$problem_number.$ext, (with exceptions for
languages which tie module names and filenames and don't allow module
names to start with numbers, like Erlang and Limbo).  Some problems I
have solved by hand; these solutions usually aren't present in the code.

Several of the solutions include "benchmark" information in the
comments.  Your mileage will certainly vary, since the odds are
incredibly small that you are running the same version of the same OS on
the same CPU with the same memory and the same amount of load on the
machine.  In fact, the times were produced on two different machines,
and one of the machines went through some hardware changes.  I do not
think I need to warn you that the times presented should not be taken
seriously, and that despite their often being presented with several
significant digits, most of them should actually read only one of four
ways: "no time at all", "a few seconds", "a few minutes", or "forever".

Everything in this repo is released into the public domain.  It's almost
all straightforward application of basic principles, but if you somehow
find a use for any of it, I'd be interested in hearing.