The Roboto Programming Language -- Because Robots Should Be Doing the Work
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README

Note:  This README is out of date.  Roboto has settled and, for the most
part stabilized.  The Cynara library has died of a severe case of
maldesign (it was really an odd way of doing things to begin with, but
great fun nonetheless), and work on the compiler proper has started.
I've nearly settled on a final name for the language (although I am
happy to hear any suggestions), and will start pushing to it as soon as
simple lambdas compile properly and I've finalized the approach for the
top-level.  The compiler itself is so far written in a mix of Roboto and
C, and after it can compile itself, it the Roboto parts will gradually
subsume the C parts.

The intermediate language is C (so the compilation process will take
Roboto source, produce C source, and enlist a C compiler to produce
machine code).  This allows for the language to be machine- and
ABI-independent and leave the rest to the C compiler.  I hope to support
at least GCC and Plan 9's 9c, although initially only GCC will be
supported.

(As tempted as I am to make Go the intermediate language, there are a
couple of problems:  Go is still a moving target at time of writing, and
the language's design goals explicitly exclude making interoperability
with C a priority, which is a priority for Roboto.)

I am fairly interested in a non-autotools build system, provided there
aren't any horrible extra compile-time dependencies.  (Libtool is almost
too much for me, and CMake and SCons are right out.)  I am using
plain Makefiles for now; suggestions are welcome.

The original README follows.

---

I am slowly cleaning up and moving code onto github.  In the near term,
the only concrete plans are to move code written *in* Roboto[0] to
github, rather than start moving Roboto itself over.  When Roboto is at
the point that it is written in itself, then it will get pushed.  The
current plan 

There's some reasoning here, bear with me.

This code is worse than alpha.  It's super-alpha.  Pre-alpha.  Negative
alpha.  The Roboto interpreter, as it stands, has several problems:
0.  It's still an interpreter, not yet a compiler; it is still a
    prototype.  But if you want to know the escape plan, have a look at
    lib/cynara.rl and the Pez project.
1.  It's slow.  See #1
2.  It's buggy, and most bugs will not be fixed in the interpreter
    version.
3.  I like to change the syntax for lambdas once a week.  It's in pretty
    heavy flux.
4.  The error messages are unfriendly and sometimes curse at you or
    sometimes are about the Time Cube, and often have no useful
    information in them.

Because I no longer work in an office full of language wonks, the amount
of feedback I get on this language is quite a bit less than it was a few
weeks ago.  I would like to hear what people think of the design of the
language.  It's nearing the end of the exploratory phase, and the really
real implementation will happen in my copious free time.  

In other words, I've spent a long time looking at the language and
saying "Writing this like X is ugly...What if I could write that like Y
instead?" and pushing the code around.  Sometimes I'd go jabber at
someone[1] for a while about the language, or drag them over to my desk and
gesture wildly at my screen.  

So this seems like as good a time as any[2] to start looking for broader
input.  The current implementation, after bootstrapping the compiler, is
going away, but I'll have to live with the the design decisions that are
made before the compiler is written and things are set in stone.  

So if you have any input on how the language ought to look, how a
particular construct should behave, or something along those lines, I'd
love to hear what you think.

--
[0] The name is based on the idea that, as coders, our entire livelihood
is based on using machines to automate tasks that are tedious to people.
Robots should be doing the work.  This language was designed to
eliminate, as much as possible, the tedium I felt when writing code in
many other languages, by introducing as much uniformity and transparency
into the language as possible.

[1] That person was usually Dan Yoder ( http://github.com/dyoder ), who
has always had valuable input.  I almost named the language "Ocean" so
that he would be forced to port Waves, and he is still upset with me for
not going with a bytecode VM, I think.  Dan, are we cool yet?

[2] Matthew King ( http://github.com/automatthew ), among others, has also
been chastising me for keeping the repository in Darcs, and I recently
promised him a few others that I'd put *something* up.