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Fix misspelled library names

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Mo-Gul authored and hmenke committed Sep 1, 2019
1 parent d090a70 commit ee17ca51395308d7df7d8fe6f805c20ec69f8017
@@ -216,7 +216,7 @@ \subsubsection{The Library Packages}
There is a special command for loading library packages. The difference between
a library and module is the following: A library just defines additional
objects using the basic layer, whereas a module adds completely new
functionality. For instance, a decoration library defines additional
functionality. For instance, a |decorations| library defines additional
decorations, while a decoration module defines the whole code for handling
decorations.

@@ -2662,7 +2662,7 @@ \subsubsection{Advanced: Defining New Placement Strategies}

\subsection{Advanced: Creating New Axis Systems}

The data visualization library comes with a number of predefined axis systems,
The |datavisualization| library comes with a number of predefined axis systems,
like |scientific axes=clean|, but it is also possible and to define new axis
systems. Doing so involves the following steps:
%
@@ -509,7 +509,7 @@ \subsection{Namespaces and File Names}

\subsubsection{Namespaces}

All parts of the graph drawing library reside in the Lua ``namespace''
All parts of the |graphdrawing| library reside in the Lua ``namespace''
|pgf.gd|, which is itself a ``sub-namespace'' of |pgf|. For your own
algorithms, you are free to place them in whatever namespace you like; only for
the official distribution of \pgfname\ everything has been put into the correct
@@ -610,7 +610,7 @@ \subsubsection{Creating a Month List Arrangement}
\subsection{Arrangements}

An \emph{arrangement} specifies how the days of calendar are arranged on the
page. The calendar library defines a number of predefined arrangements.
page. The |calendar| library defines a number of predefined arrangements.

We start with arrangements in which the days are listed in a long line.

@@ -84,12 +84,13 @@ \subsubsection{A First Example}
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{codeexample}

An important feature of the circuit library is that the appearance of a circuit
can be configured in general ways and that the labels are placed automatically
by default. Here is the graphic once more, generated from \emph{exactly the
same source code}, with only the options of the |{tikzpicture}| environment
replaced by |[rotate=-90,circuit ee IEC,x=3.25cm,y=2.25cm]|:

An important feature of the |circuits| library is that the appearance of a
circuit can be configured in general ways and that the labels are placed
automatically by default. Here is the graphic once more, generated from
\emph{exactly the same source code}, with only the options of the
|{tikzpicture}| environment replaced by
|[rotate=-90,circuit ee IEC,x=3.25cm,y=2.25cm]|:
%
\begin{tikzpicture}[rotate=-90,circuit ee IEC,x=3cm,y=2.25cm]
% Let us start with some contacts:
\foreach \contact/\y in {1/1,2/2,3/3.5,4/4.5,5/5.5}
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ \section{Externalization Library}
{\noindent {\emph{by Christian Feuersänger}}}

\begin{tikzlibrary}{external}
This library provides a high-level automatic or semi--automatic export
This library provides a high-level automatic or semi-automatic export
feature for \tikzname\ pictures. Its purpose is to convert each picture to
a separate \pdf\ without changing the document as such.

@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ \subsubsection{Support for Labels and References In External Files}
Note that |\pageref| is not supported (sorry).

Point b) works as follows: a |\label| inside of an externalized graphics
causes the external library to generate separate auxiliary files for every
causes the |external| library to generate separate auxiliary files for every
external image. These files are called \meta{imagename}|.dpth|. The
extension |.dpth| indicates that the file also contains the image's depth
(the |baseline| key of \tikzname). Furthermore, anything which would have
@@ -461,7 +461,7 @@ \subsubsection{Remaking Figures or Skipping Figures}
\begin{command}{\tikzexternalfiledependsonfile\marg{external graphics}\marg{file name}}
A variant of |\tikzpicturedependsonfile| which adds a dependency for an
\meta{external graphics}. The argument \meta{external graphics} must be the
path as it would have been generated by the external library, i.e.\ without
path as it would have been generated by the |external| library, i.e.\ without
file extension but including any prefixes.
\end{command}

@@ -596,7 +596,7 @@ \subsubsection{Remaking Figures or Skipping Figures}
What happens if you change ``My comment'' to ``My super comment''? Well,
|external| will \emph{not} pick it up; you will need to handle this
manually. However, if you modify anything between |\begin{tikzpicture}| and
|\end{tikzpicture}|, the external library \emph{will} pick it up and
|\end{tikzpicture}|, the |external| library \emph{will} pick it up and
regenerate the picture.

The |up to date check| is applied for |mode=convert with system call| and
@@ -606,7 +606,7 @@ \subsubsection{Remaking Figures or Skipping Figures}
\begin{command}{\tikzexternaldisable}
Allows to disable the complete externalization. While |export next| will
still collect the contents of picture environments, this command uninstalls
the hooks for the external library completely. Thus, nested picture
the hooks for the |external| library completely. Thus, nested picture
environments or environments where |\end{tikzpicture}| is not directly
reachable won't produce compilation failures -- although it is not possible
to externalize them automatically.
@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ \subsection{Usage}

It does not hurt to call |fpu=true| or |fpu=false| multiple times.

Please note that if the |fixed point arithmetics| library of \pgfname\ will
Please note that if the |fixedpointarithmetic| library of \pgfname\ will
be activated after the FPU, the FPU will be deactivated automatically.
\end{key}

@@ -152,8 +152,8 @@ \subsection{Comparison to the fixed point arithmetics library}

There are other ways to increase the data range and/or the precision of
\pgfname's math parser. One of them is the |fp| package, preferable combined
with \pgfname's |fixed point arithmetic| library. The differences between the
FPU and |fp| are:
with \pgfname's |fixedpointarithmetic| library. The differences between the FPU
and |fp| are:
%
\begin{itemize}
\item The FPU supports at least the complete IEEE double precision number
@@ -236,7 +236,7 @@ \subsection{End-of-Lines and End-of-Row Characters in Matrices of Nodes}
\subsection{Delimiters}
Delimiters are parentheses or braces to the left and right of a formula or a
matrix. The matrix library offers options for adding such delimiters to a
matrix. The |matrix| library offers options for adding such delimiters to a
matrix. However, delimiters can actually be added to any node that has the
standard anchors |north|, |south|, |north west| and so on. In particular, you
can add delimiters to any |rectangle| box. They are implemented by ``measuring
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ \subsection{Overview}
huge circle, ellipse, or cloud. The related concepts then ``leave'' this root
concept via branch-like tendrils.

The mindmap library of \tikzname\ produces mindmaps that look a bit different
The |mindmap| library of \tikzname\ produces mindmaps that look a bit different
from the standard mindmaps: While the big root concept is still a circle,
related concepts are also depicted as (smaller) circles. The related concepts
are linked to the root concept via organic-looking connections. The overall
@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ \subsubsection{The Circle Connection Bar Decoration}
default as the edges from parents in the mindmap tree.

For the drawing of the bars a special decoration is used, which is defined in
the mindmap library:
the |mindmap| library:

\begin{decoration}{circle connection bar}
This decoration can be used to connect two circles. The start of the
@@ -381,7 +381,7 @@ \subsubsection{The Circle Connection Bar To-Path}

The |circle connection bar| decoration is a bit complicated to use. Especially
specifying the radii is quite bothersome (the amplitude and the angle can be
set once and for all). For this reason, the mindmap library defines a special
set once and for all). For this reason, the |mindmap| library defines a special
to-path that performs the necessary computations for you.

\begin{stylekey}{/tikz/circle connection bar}
@@ -420,8 +420,8 @@ \subsubsection{The Circle Connection Bar To-Path}
In a mindmap we sometimes want colors to change from one concept color to
another. Then, the connection bar should, ideally, consist of a smooth
transition between these two colors. Getting this right using shadings is a bit
tricky if you try this ``by hand'', so the mindmap library provides a special
option for facilitating this procedure.
tricky if you try this ``by hand'', so the |mindmap| library provides a
special option for facilitating this procedure.

\begin{key}{/tikz/circle connection bar switch color=|from (|\meta{first color}|) to (|\meta{second color}|)|}
This style works similarly to the |circle connection bar|. The only
@@ -131,8 +131,8 @@ \subsection{Tokens}
token node. Worse, when we have \emph{two} tokens on a node, it is difficult to
place both nodes inside the node without overlap.

The Petri net library offers a solution to this problem: The
|children are tokens| style.
The Petri library offers a solution to this problem: The |children are tokens|
style.

\begin{stylekey}{/tikz/children are tokens}
The idea behind this style is to use trees mechanism for placing tokens.
@@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ \subsection{Defining Profiler Entries}
\end{codeexample}
%
Thus, \meta{argument pattern} is a copy-paste from the definition of your
command. The \meta{invocation pattern} is used by the profiler library to
command. The \meta{invocation pattern} is used by the |profiler| library to
invoke the \emph{original} command, so it is closely related to
\meta{argument pattern}, but it needs extra curly braces around each
argument.
@@ -223,7 +223,7 @@ \subsection{Defining Profiler Entries}
|\jobname.profiler.|\meta{YYYY}|-|\meta{MM}|-|\meta{DD}|_|\meta{HH}|h_|\meta{MM}|m.dat|
with the same information.

Note that the profiler library predefines two profiler entries, namely
Note that the |profiler| library predefines two profiler entries, namely
|main job| which counts time from the beginning of the document until
|\pgfprofilepostprocess| and |preamble| which counts time from the
beginning of the document until |\begin{document}|.
@@ -1991,7 +1991,7 @@ \subsection{Callout Shapes}
\begin{shape}{cloud callout}
This shape is a callout whose main shape is a cloud which fits the node
contents. The pointer is segmented, consisting of a series of shrinking
ellipses. This callout requires the symbol shape library (for the cloud
ellipses. This callout requires the |shapes.callouts| library (for the cloud
shape). If this library is not loaded an error will result.
%
\begin{codeexample}[preamble={\usetikzlibrary{shapes.callouts}}]
@@ -1315,7 +1315,7 @@ \subsection{Doing Multiple Actions on a Path}
\end{codeexample}

Naturally, you would normally create a style |shadow| that contains the
above code. The shadow library, see Section~\ref{section-libs-shadows},
above code. The |shadows| library, see Section~\ref{section-libs-shadows},
contains predefined shadows of this kind.

It is possible to use the |preaction| option multiple times. In this case,
@@ -1987,7 +1987,7 @@ \subsubsection{Animating Transformations: Views}
using the |meet| or |slice| keys from the |views| library, see
Section~\ref{section-library-views}. You can then animate the view using
the |view| attribute. The values passed to the |entry| key follow the same
syntax as the views in the view library (though you only animate the
syntax as the views in the |views| library (though you only animate the
to-be-viewed rectangle).
%
\begin{codeexample}[
@@ -176,11 +176,11 @@ \subsection{Overview}
most decorations there are no real alternatives.

\begin{tikzlibrary}{decorations}
In order to use decorations, you first have to load a decoration library.
This |decoration| library defines the basic options described in the
In order to use decorations, you first have to load a |decorations| library.
This |decorations| library defines the basic options described in the
following, but it does not define any new decorations. This is done by
libraries like |decorations.text|. Since these more specialized libraries
include the |decoration| library automatically, you usually do not have to
include the |decorations| library automatically, you usually do not have to
bother about it.
\end{tikzlibrary}

@@ -2538,9 +2538,9 @@ \subsection{Online Placement Strategies}
\emph{not} the primary job of the library to compute good positions for nodes
in a graph -- use for instance a |\matrix|, specify good positions ``by hand''
or use the graph drawing facilities. Nevertheless, some basic support for
automatic node placement is provided for simple cases. The graph library will
provide you with information about the position of nodes inside their groups
and chains.
automatic node placement is provided for simple cases. The |graphs| library
will provide you with information about the position of nodes inside their
groups and chains.
As a graph is being constructed, a \emph{placement strategy} is used to
determine a (reasonably good) position for the nodes as they are created. These
@@ -715,7 +715,7 @@ \subsection{Smooth Plots, Sharp Plots, Jump Plots, Comb Plots and Bar Plots}
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{codeexample}
%
The use of |bar width| and |bar shift| is explained in the plot handler
The use of |bar width| and |bar shift| is explained in the |plothandlers|
library documentation, section~\ref{section-plotlib-bar-handlers}. Please
refer to page~\pageref{key-bar-width}.
\end{key}
@@ -747,7 +747,7 @@ \subsection{Smooth Plots, Sharp Plots, Jump Plots, Comb Plots and Bar Plots}
be ignored.
You can configure relative shifts and relative bar widths, which is
explained in the plot handler library documentation,
explained in the |plothandlers| library documentation,
section~\ref{section-plotlib-bar-handlers}. Please refer to
page~\pageref{key-bar-interval-width}.
\end{key}
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ \subsubsection{Syntax of the Node Command}
Note that |behind path| only applies to the current path; not to the
current scope or picture. To put a node ``behind everything'' you need
to use layers and options like |on background layer|, see the
background library in Section~\ref{section-tikz-backgrounds}.
|backgrounds| library in Section~\ref{section-tikz-backgrounds}.
\end{key}

\begin{key}{/tikz/in front of path}
@@ -329,8 +329,8 @@ \subsubsection{The Intersection of the Circles}

Euclid can now draw the line and the circles. The final problem is to compute
the intersection of the two circles. This computation is a bit involved if you
want to do it ``by hand''. Fortunately, the intersection library allows us to
compute the intersection of arbitrary paths.
want to do it ``by hand''. Fortunately, the |intersections| library allows us
to compute the intersection of arbitrary paths.

The idea is simple: First, you ``name'' two paths using the |name path| option.
Then, at some later point, you can use the option |name intersections|, which
@@ -623,7 +623,7 @@ \subsection{Adding the Lecture Annotations}
same as the contents of a lecture). For each lecture he intends to put a little
rectangle on the map containing these learning targets and the name of the
lecture, each time somewhere near the topic of the lecture. Such ``little
rectangles'' are called ``annotations'' by the mindmap library.
rectangles'' are called ``annotations'' by the |mindmap| library.

In order to place the annotations next to the concepts, Johannes must assign
names to the nodes of the concepts. He could rely on \tikzname's automatic
@@ -643,7 +643,7 @@ \subsection{Adding the Lecture Annotations}
...
\end{codeexample}

The |annotation| style of the mind map library mainly sets up a rectangular
The |annotation| style of the |mindmap| library mainly sets up a rectangular
shape of appropriate size. Johannes configures the style by defining
|every annotation| appropriately.
%

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