Skip to content
New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Use generics #463

Closed
wants to merge 1 commit into from
Closed

Use generics #463

wants to merge 1 commit into from

Conversation

@marschall
Copy link
Contributor

@marschall marschall commented Dec 25, 2015

Since the source is now Java 1.5 or later we can replace raw types with
generics. The code base already uses generics but very sparsingly.

Due to the design of Java generics and type erasure this should all be
backwards compatible.

Since the source is now Java 1.5 or later we can replace raw types with
generics. The code base already uses generics but very sparsingly.

Due to the design of Java generics and type erasure this should all be
backwards compatible.
@vlsi
Copy link
Member

@vlsi vlsi commented Dec 25, 2015

Technically speaking, source is Java 1.6+

The change itself looks good to me.

@marschall , are you going to update PR with more changes?

There are certain commit message rules. Please pay attention to it (especially to the first line of the commit message).

@marschall
Copy link
Contributor Author

@marschall marschall commented Dec 25, 2015

I don't plan to add more changes but I can fix the commit message.

vlsi added a commit that referenced this pull request Dec 26, 2015
Since the source is now Java 1.6 or later we can replace raw types with
generics. The code base already uses generics but very sparsingly.

Due to the design of Java generics and type erasure this should all be
backwards compatible.

closees #463
@vlsi vlsi closed this in c10acf0 Dec 26, 2015
@davecramer
Copy link
Member

@davecramer davecramer commented Dec 26, 2015

How do you close these without merging ?

Dave Cramer

On 26 December 2015 at 02:56, Vladimir Sitnikov notifications@github.com
wrote:

Closed #463 #463 via c10acf0
c10acf0
.


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#463 (comment).

@vlsi
Copy link
Member

@vlsi vlsi commented Dec 27, 2015

I've updated commit message, thus it became another commit id (see c10acf0).
In the commit message I've added closes #463, thus GiHub closed the PR as commit landed in master.

Is there something wrong with that approach?

@davecramer
Copy link
Member

@davecramer davecramer commented Dec 27, 2015

No, nothing at all. Just wondering how to avoid doing merges. They provide
an ugly history.

Dave Cramer

On 27 December 2015 at 01:51, Vladimir Sitnikov notifications@github.com
wrote:

I've updated commit message, thus it became another commit id (see c10acf0
c10acf0
).
In the commit message I've added closes #463, thus GiHub closed the PR as
commit landed in master.

Is there something wrong with that approach?


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#463 (comment).

@vlsi
Copy link
Member

@vlsi vlsi commented Dec 27, 2015

how to avoid doing merges. They provide an ugly history.

This is exactly why I rebase & commit instead of merge.

It is like

git fetch origin pull/463/head:pr463
git checkout pr463
git rebase -i origin/master
# hack hack, add "closes #463"
git checkout master
git merge --ff pr463
git push origin master
@davecramer
Copy link
Member

@davecramer davecramer commented Dec 27, 2015

Too bad github doesn't do that

Does it preserve the original author's attribution on github?

Dave Cramer

On 27 December 2015 at 07:13, Vladimir Sitnikov notifications@github.com
wrote:

how to avoid doing merges. They provide an ugly history.

This is exactly why I rebase & commit instead of merge.

It is like

git fetch origin pull/463/head:pr463
git checkout pr463
git rebase -i origin/master

hack hack, add "closes #463"

git checkout master
git merge --ff pr463
git push origin master


Reply to this email directly or view it on GitHub
#463 (comment).

@vlsi
Copy link
Member

@vlsi vlsi commented Dec 27, 2015

It does. If authorship somehow flies away, it can be recovered via git commit --amend --author 'desired author <..>'

Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment
Projects
None yet
Linked issues

Successfully merging this pull request may close these issues.

None yet

3 participants
You can’t perform that action at this time.