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Overview

The following flowchart attempts to give you a picture of what happens when a push message arrives on your device when you have an app using phonegap-plugin-push.

push-flowchart

Push message arrives with app in foreground

  • The push plugin receives the data from the remote push service and calls all of your on('notification') event handlers.
  • The message is not displayed in the devices' notification center, as that is not normal behaviour for Android or iOS.

Push message arrives with app in background

  • The push plugin receives the data from the remote push service and checks to see if there is a title or message in the received data object. If there is, then the message will be displayed in the devices notification center.
  • Then the push plugin checks to see if the app is running. If the user has killed the application, then no further processing of the push data will occur.
  • If the app is running in the background the push plugin then checks to see if content-available exists in the push data.
  • If content-available is set to 1, then the plugin calls all of your notification event handlers.

Note: if count is given as 0 then all notifications are first cleared: always on Android, and if the count has gone down on iOS

User clicks on notification in notification center

  • The app starts.
  • Then the plugin calls all of your notification event handlers.

Note: if the push payload contained content-available: 1 then your notification event handler has already been called. It is up to you to handle the double event.

Some ways to handle this double event are:

  • don't include title/message in the push so it doesn't show up in the shader.
  • send two pushes, one to be processed in the background, and the other to show up in the shade.
  • include a unique ID in your push so you can check to see if you've already processed this event.

Push Notification Message Format Overview

Android Message Format

The JSON push message can contain the following fields, see https://developers.google.com/cloud-messaging/http-server-ref for a complete list.

var content = {
  priority: 'normal', // Valid values are "normal" and "high."
  data: {
    title: 'A short string describing the purpose of the notification',
    message: 'The text of the alert message', // "body" can be used as alias, is converted to "message"
    // localization of message is possible
    count: 5, // set the badge notification count at app icon
    sound: 'default', // play default sound ... or "soundname", see [Android Sound](#sound) section
    notId: 1, // unique ID for the message, used for grouping, see below
    'content-available': '0', // configure background updates, see below
    custom_key1: 'value1',
    custom_key2: 'value2'
  }
};

Using AWS-SNS with GCM

This is the JSON-encoded format you can e.g. send via AWS-SNS's web UI. Note, that the core message is json-encoded twice, so if we take the content from above you convert it this way

var gcm_message = JSON.stringify({
  GCM: JSON.stringify(content),
  default: 'plain text message again'
});
{
  "GCM": "{\"priority\":\"normal\",\"data\":{\"title\":\"A short string describing the purpose of the notification\",\"message\":\"The text of the alert message\",\"count\":5,\"sound\": \"default\",\"notId\":1,\"content-available\":\"0\",\"custom_key1\":\"value1\",\"custom_key2\":\"value2\"}}",
  "default": "plain text message again"
}

Message Received in JavaScript

This message is received in the push.on("notification") handler as follows. Note that the properties are "normalized" across platforms, so this is passed to the app on android:

{
  "count": "5",
  "message": "The text of the alert message",
  "sound": "default",
  "title": "A short string describing the purpose of the notification",
  "additionalData": {
    "custom_key1": "value1",
    "custom_key2": "value2",
    "notId": "1",
    "content_available": "0",
    "dismissed": false,
    "google.message_id": "...",
    "coldstart": false,
    "foreground": false
  }
}

iOS Message Format

The JSON message can contain the following fields, see Apple developer docs for a complete list

{
  "aps": {
    "alert": {
      // alternatively just a string: "Your Message",
      "title": "A short string describing the purpose of the notification",
      "body": "The text of the alert message",
      // localization of message is possible
      "launch-image": "The filename of an image file in the app bundle, with or without the filename extension. The image is used as the launch image when users tap the action button or move the action slider"
    },
    "badge": 5, // Number to show at App icon
    "content-available": "0", // configure background updates, see below
    "category": "identifier", // Provide this key with a string value that represents the notification’s type
    "thread-id": "id", // Provide this key with a string value that represents the app-specific identifier for grouping notifications
    "sound": "default" // play default sound, or custom sound, see [iOS Sound](#sound-1) section
  },
  "notId": 1,
  "custom_key1": "value1",
  "custom_key2": "value2"
}

Using AWS-SNS with APNS

This is the JSON-encoded format you can send via AWS-SNS's web UI:

{
  "APNS_SANDBOX": "{\"aps\":{\"alert\":{\"title\":\"A short string describing the purpose of the notification\",\"body\":\"The text of the alert message\",\"launch-image\":\"The filename of an image file in the app bundle, with or without the filename extension. The image is used as the launch image when users tap the action button or move the action slider\"},\"badge\":5,\"content-available\":\"0\",\"category\":\"identifier\",\"thread-id\":\"id\",\"sound\":\"default\"},\"notId\":1,\"custom_key1\":\"value1\",\"custom_key2\":\"value2\"}"
}

Note: use "APNS" to send to an app signed and released to production or "APNS_SANDBOX" or to send to an app signed and released for development. You can include both keys (APNS and APNS_SANDBOX) in the message if you want to send both to apps signed for production and apps signed for development.

{
  "APNS": "{\"aps\":...}",
  "APNS_SANDBOX": "{\"aps\":...}",
  "default": "plain text message again"
}

Message Received in JavaScript

This message is received in the push.on("notification") handler as follows. Note that the properties are "normalized" accross platforms, so this is passed to the app on iOS:

{
  "count": 5, // "badge" is converted to "count"
  "message": "The text of the alert message",
  "sound": "default",
  "title": "A short string describing the purpose of the notification",
  "additionalData": {
    "category": "identifier",
    "coldstart": false,
    "foreground": false,
    "content-available": "0",
    "notId": 1,
    "custom_key1": "value1",
    "custom_key2": "value2",
    "launch-image": "The filename of an image file in the app bundle, with or without the filename extension. The image is used as the launch image when users tap the action button or move the action slider",
    "thread-id": "id"
  }
}

Android Behaviour

Notification vs Data Payloads

Notifications behave differently depending on the foreground/background state of the receiving app and the payload you send to the app.

For instance if you send the following payload:

{
  "notification": {
    "title": "Test Notification",
    "body": "This offer expires at 11:30 or whatever",
    "notId": 10
  }
}

When your app is in the foreground, any on('notification') handlers you have registered will be called. However, if your app is in the background, the notification will show up in the system tray. Clicking on the notification in the system tray will start the app but your on('notification') handler will not be called as messages that have notification payloads will not cause the plugins onMessageReceived method to be called.

If you send a payload with a mix of notification & data objects like this:

{
  "notification": {
    "title": "Test Notification",
    "body": "This offer expires at 11:30 or whatever",
    "notId": 10
  },
  "data": {
    "surveyID": "ewtawgreg-gragrag-rgarhthgbad"
  }
}

When your app is in the foreground any on('notification') handlers you have registered will be called. If your app is in the background, the notification will show up in the system tray. Clicking on the notification in the system tray will start the app and your on('notification') handler will not be called as messages that have notification payloads will not cause the plugins onMessageReceived method to be called.

My recommended format for your push payload when using this plugin (while it differs from Google's docs) works 100% of the time:

{
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Notification",
    "body": "This offer expires at 11:30 or whatever",
    "notId": 10,
    "surveyID": "ewtawgreg-gragrag-rgarhthgbad"
  }
}

When your app is in the foreground any on('notification') handlers you have registered will be called. If your app is in the background, then the notification will show up in the system tray. Clicking on the notification in the system tray will start the app, and your on('notification') handler will be called with the following data:

{
  "message": "This offer expires at 11:30 or whatever",
  "title": "Test Notification",
  "additionalData": {
    "surveyID": "ewtawgreg-gragrag-rgarhthgbad"
  }
}

Localization

Plugin supported localization from resources for: title, message and summaryText.

You may use simple link to locale constant.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": { "locKey": "push_app_title" },
    "message": "Simple non-localizable text for message!"
  }
}

Or use localization with formatted constants.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": { "locKey": "push_app_title" },
    "message": { "locKey": "push_message_fox", "locData": ["fox", "dog"] }
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: { locKey: 'push_app_title' },
    message: 'Simple non-localizable text for message!'
    // Constant with formatted params
    // message: {"locKey": "push_message_fox", "locData": ["fox", "dog"]});
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Localization must store in strings.xml

<string name="push_app_title">@string/app_name</string>
<string name="push_message_fox">The quick brown %1$s jumps over the lazy %2$s</string>
<string name="push_summary_text">%%n%% new message(s)</string>

Images

By default the icon displayed in your push notification will be your apps icon. So when you initialize the plugin like this:

const push = PushNotification.init({
  android: {},
  browser: {
    pushServiceURL: 'http://push.api.phonegap.com/v1/push'
  },
  ios: {
    alert: 'true',
    badge: 'true',
    sound: 'true'
  },
  windows: {}
});

The result will look much like this:

2015-07-24 02 52 00

Note that the notification icon has gone from the default, rich, multicolored cordova icon, to a white-on-gray one. What's going on here?

With Android now greatly using Material design since 5.0 (Lollipop), push notification icons are forced to be monochromatic - this can be difficult to diagnose, as a lot of icons just show as a white square if not properly designed.

You should design one with these guidelines in mind:

  • 96x96 pixels
  • Transparent background
  • White foreground

For more details, please read:

Note: any color foreground will work - any non-transparent pixels are just rendered white.

To specify an alternate icon and background color to be shown when receiving a push notification, use the following:

const push = PushNotification.init({
  android: {
    icon: 'phonegap',
    iconColor: 'blue'
  },
  browser: {
    pushServiceURL: 'http://push.api.phonegap.com/v1/push'
  },
  ios: {
    alert: 'true',
    badge: 'true',
    sound: 'true'
  },
  windows: {}
});

Where icon is the name of an .png image file in the Android res/drawable folder. For example: platforms/android/res/drawable/phonegap.png

You can use a resource-file tag to copy the image to the res/drawable folder like this:

  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-mdpi/icon.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-mdpi/icon.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-hdpi/icon.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-hdpi/icon.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-xhdpi/icon.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-xhdpi/icon.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-xxhdpi/icon.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-xxhdpi/icon.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-xxxhdpi/icon.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-xxxhdpi/icon.png" />

iconColor is one of the supported formats #RRGGBB or #AARRGGBB or one of the following names: 'red', 'blue', 'green', 'black', 'white', 'gray', 'cyan', 'magenta', 'yellow', 'lightgray', 'darkgray', 'grey', 'lightgrey', 'darkgrey', 'aqua', 'fuchsia', 'lime', 'maroon', 'navy', 'olive', 'purple', 'silver', 'teal'. iconColor is supported on Android 5.0 and greater.

Please follow the Android icon design guidelines when creating your icon.

2015-07-24 02 46 58

Additionally, each push can include a large icon which is used to personalize each push. The location of the image may be one of three types.

The first is the res/drawable folder in your app. This JSON is sent from FCM:

{
    "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
    "data": {
        "title": "Large Icon",
    	"message": "Loaded from drawable folder",
    	"image": "twitter"
    }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Large Icon',
    message: 'Loaded from drawables folder.',
    image: 'twitter'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Would look for the twitter image in the res/drawable folder and produce the following notification.

2015-07-24 02 34 41

Again you can use a resource-file tag to copy the image to the res/drawable folder like this:

  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-mdpi/twitter.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-mdpi/twitter.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-hdpi/twitter.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-hdpi/twitter.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-xhdpi/twitter.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-xhdpi/twitter.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-xxhdpi/twitter.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-xxhdpi/twitter.png" />
  <resource-file src="res/icon/android/push/drawable-xxxhdpi/twitter.png" target="app/src/main/res/drawable-xxxhdpi/twitter.png" />

The second is the assets folder in your app. This JSON sent from FCM:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Large Icon",
    "message": "Loaded from assets folder",
    "image": "www/image/logo.png"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Large Icon',
    message: 'Loaded from assets folder.',
    image: 'www/image/logo.png'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Would look for the logo.png file in the assets/www/img folder. Since your apps www folder gets copied into the Android assets folder it is an excellent spot to store the images without needing to write a hook to copy them to the res/drawable folder. It produces the following notification.

2015-07-24 02 20 02

The third is the remote URL. This JSON sent from FCM:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Large Icon",
    "message": "Loaded from URL",
    "image": "https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/887989/antshot.png"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Large Icon',
    message: 'Loaded from URL',
    image: 'https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/887989/antshot.png'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Produces the following notification.

2015-07-24 02 17 55

Finally, the Material UI guidelines recommend using a circular icon for the large icon if the subject of the image is a person. This JSON sent from FCM:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Large Circular Icon",
    "message": "Loaded from URL",
    "image": "https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/837060031895896065/VHIQ4oUf_400x400.jpg",
    "image-type": "circle"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Large Circular Icon',
    message: 'Loaded from URL',
    image:
      'https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/837060031895896065/VHIQ4oUf_400x400.jpg',
    'image-type': 'circular'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Produces the following notification.

screenshot_20170308-214947

Sound

For Android there are three special values for sound you can use. The first is default which will play the phones default notification sound.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Default",
    "message": "Plays default notification sound",
    "soundname": "default"
  }
}

Then second is ringtone which will play the phones default ringtone sound.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Ringtone",
    "message": "Plays default ringtone sound",
    "soundname": "ringtone"
  }
}

The third is the empty string which will cause for the playing of sound to be skipped.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Silece",
    "message": "Skips playing any sound",
    "soundname": ""
  }
}

In order for your your notification to play a custom sound you will need to add the files to your Android project's res/raw directory. The best way to do this is by using a resource-file tag in your config.xml.

<resource-file src="assets/sound/test.mp3" target="app/src/main/res/raw/test.mp3" />

Then send the follow JSON from FCM:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Sound Test",
    "message": "Loaded res/raw",
    "soundname": "test"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Sound Test',
    message: 'Loaded res/raw',
    soundname: 'test'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Note: when you specify the custom sound file name omit the file's extension.

Stacking

By default when using this plugin on Android each notification that your app receives will replace the previous notification in the shade.

If you want to see multiple notifications in the shade you will need to provide a notification ID as part of the push data sent to the app. For instance if you send:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Push",
    "message": "Push number 1"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Test Push',
    message: 'Push number 1'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Followed by:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Push",
    "message": "Push number 2"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Test Push',
    message: 'Push number 2'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

You will only see "Push number 2" in the shade. However, if you send:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Push",
    "message": "Push number 1",
    "notId": 1
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Test Push',
    message: 'Push number 1',
    notId: 1
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

and:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Push",
    "message": "Push number 2",
    "notId": 2
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Test Push',
    message: 'Push number 2',
    notId: 2
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

You will see both "Push number 1" and "Push number 2" in the shade.

Inbox Stacking

A better alternative to stacking your notifications is to use the inbox style to have up to 8 lines of notification text in a single notification. If you send the following JSON from FCM you will see:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "My Title",
    "message": "My first message",
    "style": "inbox",
    "summaryText": "There are %n% notifications"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'My Title',
    message: 'My first message',
    style: 'inbox',
    summaryText: 'There are %n% notifications'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

It will produce a normal looking notification:

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But, if you follow it up with subsequent notifications like:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "My Title",
    "message": "My second message",
    "style": "inbox",
    "summaryText": "There are %n% notifications"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'My Title',
    message: 'My second message',
    style: 'inbox',
    summaryText: 'There are %n% notifications'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

You will get an inbox view so you can display multiple notifications in a single panel.

2015-08-25 14 01 35

If you use %n% in the summaryText of the JSON coming down from FCM it will be replaced by the number of messages that are currently in the queue.

Action Buttons

Your notification can include a maximum of three action buttons. You register the event callback name for each of your actions, then when a user clicks on one of notification's buttons, the event corresponding to that button is fired and the listener you have registered is invoked. For instance, here is a setup with two actions emailGuests and snooze.

const push = PushNotification.init({
  android: {}
});

// data contains the push payload just like a notification event
push.on('emailGuests', data => {
  console.log('I should email my guests');
});

push.on('snooze', data => {
  console.log('Remind me later');
});

If you wish to include an icon along with the button name, they must be placed in the res/drawable directory of your Android project. Then you can send the following JSON from FCM:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "AUX Scrum",
    "message": "Scrum: Daily touchbase @ 10am Please be on time so we can cover everything on the agenda.",
    "actions": [
      {
        "icon": "emailGuests",
        "title": "EMAIL GUESTS",
        "callback": "emailGuests",
        "foreground": true
      },
      {
        "icon": "snooze",
        "title": "SNOOZE",
        "callback": "snooze",
        "foreground": false
      }
    ]
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'AUX Scrum',
    message:
      'Scrum: Daily touchbase @ 10am Please be on time so we can cover everything on the agenda.',
    actions: [
      {
        icon: 'emailGuests',
        title: 'EMAIL GUESTS',
        callback: 'emailGuests',
        foreground: true
      },
      { icon: 'snooze', title: 'SNOOZE', callback: 'snooze', foreground: false }
    ]
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

This will produce the following notification in your tray:

action_combo

If your user clicks on the main body of the notification, then your app will be opened. However, if they click on either of the action buttons the app will open (or start) and the specified event will be triggered with the callback name. In this case it is emailGuests and snooze, respectively. If you set the foreground property to true, the app will be brought to the front, if foreground is false then the callback is run without the app being brought to the foreground.

In Line Replies

Android N introduces a new capability for push notifications, the in line reply text field. If you wish to get some text data from the user when the action button is called send the following type of payload.

Your notification can include action buttons. If you wish to include an icon along with the button name they must be placed in the res/drawable directory of your Android project. Then you can send the following JSON from FCM:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "AUX Scrum",
    "message": "Scrum: Daily touchbase @ 10am Please be on time so we can cover everything on the agenda.",
    "actions": [
      {
        "icon": "emailGuests",
        "title": "EMAIL GUESTS",
        "callback": "emailGuests",
        "foreground": false,
        "inline": true,
        "replyLabel": "Enter your reply here"
      },
      {
        "icon": "snooze",
        "title": "SNOOZE",
        "callback": "snooze",
        "foreground": false
      }
    ]
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'AUX Scrum',
    message:
      'Scrum: Daily touchbase @ 10am Please be on time so we can cover everything on the agenda.',
    actions: [
      {
        icon: 'emailGuests',
        title: 'EMAIL GUESTS',
        callback: 'emailGuests',
        foreground: false,
        inline: true,
        replyLabel: 'Enter your reply here'
      },
      { icon: 'snooze', title: 'SNOOZE', callback: 'snooze', foreground: false }
    ]
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

when the user clicks on the Email Guests button whilst using Android N and greater, they will see the following:

inline_reply

Then your app's on('notification') event handler will be called without the app being brought to the foreground and the event data would be:

{
  "title": "AUX Scrum",
  "message": "Scrum: Daily touchbase @ 10am Please be on time so we can cover everything on the agenda.",
  "additionalData": {
    "inlineReply": "Sounds good",
    "actions": [
      {
        "inline": true,
        "callback": "accept",
        "foreground": false,
        "title": "Accept"
      },
      {
        "icon": "snooze",
        "callback": "reject",
        "foreground": false,
        "title": "Reject"
      }
    ],
    "actionCallback": "accept",
    "coldstart": false,
    "collapse_key": "do_not_collapse",
    "foreground": false
  }
}

and the text data that the user typed would be located in data.additionalData.inlineReply.

Note: On Android M and earlier the above in line behavior is not supported. As a fallback when inline is set to true the foreground setting will be changed to the default true setting. This allows your app to be launched from a closed state into the foreground where any behavior desired as a result of the user selecting the in line reply action button can be handled through the associated callback.

Attributes

Attribute Type Default Description
icon string Optional. The name of a drawable resource to use as the small-icon. The name should not include the extension.
title string Required. The label to display for the action button.
callback string Required. The event to be emitted when the action button is pressed.
foreground boolean true Optional. Whether or not to bring the app to the foreground when the action button is pressed.
inline boolean false Optional. Whether or not to provide a quick reply text field to the user when the button is clicked.
replyLabel string Enter your reply here Optional. If you don't include a replyLabel in your action the default will be used.

Led in Notifications

You can use a Led notifcation and choose the color of it. Just add a ledColor field in your notification in the ARGB format array:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Green LED",
    "message": "This is my message with a Green LED",
    "ledColor": [0, 0, 255, 0]
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Green LED',
    message: 'This is my message with a Green LED',
    ledColor: [0, 0, 255, 0]
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Vibration Pattern in Notifications

You can set a Vibration Pattern for your notifications. Just add a vibrationPattern field in your notification:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Vibration Pattern",
    "message": "Device should wait for 2 seconds, vibrate for 1 second then be silent for 500 ms then vibrate for 500 ms",
    "vibrationPattern": [2000, 1000, 500, 500]
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Vibration Pattern',
    message:
      'Device should wait for 2 seconds, vibrate for 1 second then be silent for 500 ms then vibrate for 500 ms',
    vibrationPattern: [2000, 1000, 500, 500]
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Priority in Notifications

You can set a priority parameter for your notifications. This priority value determines where the push notification will be put in the notification shade. Low-priority notifications may be hidden from the user in certain situations, while the user might be interrupted for a higher-priority notification. Add a priority field in your notification. -2: minimum, -1: low, 0: default , 1: high, 2: maximum priority.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "This is a maximum priority Notification",
    "message": "This notification should appear in front of all others",
    "priority": 2
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'This is a maximum priority Notification',
    message: 'This notification should appear in front of all others',
    priority: 2
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Do not confuse this with the FCM option of setting the delivery priority of the message. Which is used by FCM to tell the device whether or not it should wake up to deal with the message.

Picture Messages

Perhaps you want to include a large picture in the notification that you are sending to your users. Luckily you can do that too by sending the following JSON from FCM.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Big Picture",
    "message": "This is my big picture message",
    "style": "picture",
    "picture": "http://36.media.tumblr.com/c066cc2238103856c9ac506faa6f3bc2/tumblr_nmstmqtuo81tssmyno1_1280.jpg",
    "summaryText": "The internet is built on cat pictures"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Big Picture',
    message: 'This is my big picture message',
    picture:
      'http://36.media.tumblr.com/c066cc2238103856c9ac506faa6f3bc2/tumblr_nmstmqtuo81tssmyno1_1280.jpg',
    summaryText: 'The internet is built on cat pictures'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

This will produce the following notification in your tray:

2015-08-25 16 08 00

Note: When the notification arrives you will see the title and message like normally. You will only see the picture when the notification is expanded. Once expanded, not only will you see the picture, but the message portion will disappear and you'll see the summary text portion.

Background Notifications

On Android if you want your on('notification') event handler to be called when your app is in the background it is relatively simple.

First the JSON you send from FCM will need to include "content-available": "1". This will tell the push plugin to call your on('notification') event handler no matter what other data is in the push notification.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Push",
    "message": "Push number 1",
    "info": "super secret info",
    "content-available": "1"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Test Push',
    message: 'Push number 1',
    info: 'super secret info',
    'content-available': '1'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

or if you want the payload to be delivered directly to your app without anything showing up in the notification center, just omit the tite/message from the payload like so:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "info": "super secret info",
    "content-available": "1"
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    info: 'super secret info',
    'content-available': '1'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

If you do not want this type of behaviour, just omit "content-available": 1 from your push data and your on('notification') event handler will not be called.

Use of content_available: true

The FCM docs will tell you to send a data payload of:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "content_available": true,
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Push",
    "message": "Push number 1",
    "info": "super secret info"
  }
}

Where the content_available property is part of the main payload object. Setting the property in this part of the payload will result in the PushPlugin not getting the data correctly. Setting content_available: true will cause the Android OS to handle the push payload for you and not pass the data to the PushPlugin.

Instead move content_available: true into the data object of the payload. The property name changes slightly to use a - instead of an _. So, content_available becomes content-available and true becomes 1 as per the example below:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Test Push",
    "message": "Push number 1",
    "info": "super secret info",
    "content-available": "1"
  }
}

Chinese Android Phones

Huawei, Oppo and Xiaomi

These phones have a particular quirk that when the app is force closed that you will no longer be able to receive notifications until the app is restarted. In order for you to receive background notifications:

  • On your Huawei device go to Settings > Protected apps > check "My App" where.
  • On your Xiaomi make sure your phone has the "Auto-start" property enabled for your app.
  • On your Asus make sure your phone has the "Auto-start" property enabled for your app.

More explicit instructions can be read on Forbes website.

Application force closed

In order to take advantage of this feature, you will need to be using cordova-android 6.0.0 or higher. In order to check if the change has been properly applied look at platforms/android/**/MainActivity.java. You should see an onCreate method that looks like this:

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    // enable Cordova apps to be started in the background
    Bundle extras = getIntent().getExtras();
    if (extras != null && extras.getBoolean("cdvStartInBackground", false)) {
        moveTaskToBack(true);
    }

    // Set by <content src="index.html" /> in config.xml
    loadUrl(launchUrl);
}

If you don't see the if statement that checks for the appearance of cdvStartInBackground you will probably need to do:

phonegap platform rm android
phonegap platform add android
phonegap build android

This should add the correct code to the MainActivity class.

If you add force-start: 1 to the data payload the application will be restarted in background even if it was force closed.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Force Start",
    "message": "This notification should restart the app",
    "force-start": 1
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Force Start',
    message: 'This notification should restart the app',
    'force-start': '1'
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Caching

By default, when a notification arrives and 'content-available' is set to '1', the plugin will try to deliver the data payload even if the app is not running. In that case, the payload is cached and may be delivered when the app is started again. To disable this behavior, you can set a no-cache flag in the notification payload. 0: caching enabled (default), 1: caching disabled.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Push without cache",
    "message": "When the app is closed, this notification will not be cached",
    "content-available": "1",
    "no-cache": "1"
  }
}

Visibility of Notifications

You can set a visibility parameter for your notifications. Just add a visibility field in your notification. -1: secret, 0: private (default), 1: public. Secret shows only the most minimal information, excluding even the notification's icon. Private shows basic information about the existence of this notification, including its icon and the name of the app that posted it. The rest of the notification's details are not displayed. Public Shows the notification's full content.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "This is a maximum public Notification",
    "message": "This notification should appear in front of all others",
    "visibility": 1
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'This is a public Notification',
    message: 'You should be able to read this notification on your lock screen',
    visibility: 1
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Ongoing Notifications

Set whether this is an "ongoing" notification. Ongoing notifications cannot be dismissed by the user, so your application or service must take care of canceling them. They are typically used to indicate a background task that the user is actively engaged with (e.g., playing music) or is pending in some way and therefore occupying the device (e.g., a file download, sync operation, active network connection).

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "This is an ongoing Notification",
    "message": "Some people also call me a sticky notification",
    "ongoing": true
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

var FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
var apiKey = 'replace with API key';
var deviceID = 'my device id';
var fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

var message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'This is an ongoing Notification',
    message: 'Some people also call me a sticky notification',
    ongoing: true
  }
};

fcm.send(message, function(err, response) {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Badges

On Android not all launchers support badges. In order for us to set badges we use ShortcutBadger in order to set the badge. Check out their website to see which launchers are supported.

In order to set the badge number, you will need to include the badge property in your push payload as below:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Badge Test",
    "message": "Badges, we don't need no stinking badges",
    "badge": 7
  }
}

Here is an example using fcm-node that sends the above JSON:

const FCM = require('fcm-node');
// Replace these with your own values.
const apiKey = 'replace with API key';
const deviceID = 'my device id';
const fcm = new FCM(apiKey);

const message = {
  to: deviceID,
  data: {
    title: 'Badge Test',
    message: "Badges, we don't need no stinking badges",
    badge: 7
  }
};

fcm.send(message, (err, response) => {
  if (err) {
    console.log(err);
    console.log('Something has gone wrong!');
  } else {
    console.log('Successfully sent with response: ', response);
  }
});

Support for Twilio Notify

This plugin seamlessly supports payloads generated by Twilio Notify on Android. Specifically the parameters passed in to the Twilio REST API are available in the message payload passed to your app as follows:

  • Title --> data.title
  • Body --> data.message
  • Sound --> data.sound

Here is an example request to Twilio REST API and the corresponding JSON received by your app.

curl 'https://notify.twilio.com/v1/Services/IS1e928b239609199df31d461071fd3d23/Notifications' -X POST \
--data-urlencode 'Identity=Bob' \
--data-urlencode 'Body=Hello Bob! Twilio Notify + Phonegap is awesome!' \
--data-urlencode 'Title=Hello Bob!' \
--data-urlencode 'Sound=chime' \
-u [AccountSID]:[AuthToken]

The JSON received by your app will comply with the standards described in the sections above:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Hello Bob!",
    "message": "Hello Bob! Twilio Notify + Phonegap is awesome!",
    "sound": "chime"
  }
}

Note: "sound" and "soundname" are equivalent and are considered to be the same by the plugin.

Notification ID

When setting the notification ID, or notId, please make sure that you are not exceeding the MAX_INT value for Android. Using a value larger than MAX_INT will throw an exception which will be caught by the plugin and it will use a default value of 0.

This means you can't use the JavaScript's Date.getMilliseconds() or Java's System.currentTimeMillis() as they will give you a value greater than MAX_INT.

Clicking Notification Does Not Bring App to Foreground

If you are running into a problem where you click on the notification but your app does not get brought to the foreground check the setting of android:launchMode in your AndroidManifest.xml. If something is setting it to be anything other than singleTop you should switch it back to singleTop which is required by Apache Cordova based apps.

Notification Channels

Android O introduces a new wrinkle to push notifications in the form of NotificationChannels. If your app targets SDK Version 26 (Android O) if you have not setup a NotificationChannel, you will no longer receive push notifications. This means any Cordova app using cordova-android 6.3.0 or higher will run into this problem. Fear not however as version 2.1.0 of this plugin has implemented NotificationChannels for you.

For instance if you register for push notifications like normal:

const push = PushNotification.init({
  android: {}
});

The plugin will register a channel for you that will have the id of "PushPluginChannel". Any push notifications that arrive on your device that don't specify a channel ID or use "PushPluginChannel" as the channel will be delivered.

However, if you want to take advantage of multiple channels in your app, you can use the createChannel and deleteChannel methods to modify your apps channels.

Now when you send a push payload to the device you'll need to specify a channel:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "Hello Bob!",
    "message": "Phonegap is awesome!",
    "android_channel_id": "testchannel2"
  }
}

Failure to specify a channel in this case will prevent the NotificationManager from being able to deliver your notification.

iOS Behaviour

Sound

In order for your notification to play a custom sound, you will need to add the files to root of your iOS project. The files must be in the proper format. See the Local and Remote Notification Programming Guide for more info on proper file formats and how to convert existing sound files.

Then send the follow JSON from APNS:

{
  "aps": {
    "alert": "Test sound",
    "sound": "sub.caf"
  }
}

If you want the default sound to play upon receipt of push, use this payload:

{
  "aps": {
    "alert": "Test sound",
    "sound": "default"
  }
}

Background Notifications

NOTE: There is a bug in iOS 11 that does not process background notifications as well as it did in iOS 10. They have already announced a fix in iOS 11.1 and hopefully there will be a point release to fix this in iOS 11 as well. From the release notes for iOS 11.1 beta:

Notifications Resolved Issues • Silent push notifications are processed more frequently. (33278611)

On iOS if you want your on('notification') event handler to be called when your app is in the background you will need to do a few things.

First the JSON you send from APNS will need to include "content-available": 1 to the aps object. The "content-available": 1 property in your push message is a signal to iOS to wake up your app and give it up to 30 seconds of background processing. If do not want this type of behaviour just omit "content-available": 1 from your push data. As well you should set a notId property in the root of payload object. This is the parameter you pass to the finish method in order to tell the operating system that the processing of the push event is done.

For instance the following JSON:

{
  "aps": {
    "alert": "Test background push",
    "content-available": 1
  },
  "notId": 1 // unique ID you generate
}

will produce a notification in the notification shade and call your on('notification') event handler.

NOTE: The on('notification') event handler will not be called if Background App Refresh is disabled on the user's iOS device. (Settings > General > Background App Refresh)

However if you want your on('notification') event handler called but no notification to be shown in the shader you would omit the alert property and send the following JSON to APNS:

{
  "aps": {
    "data": "Test silent background push",
    "moredata": "Do more stuff",
    "content-available": 1
  },
  "notId": 2 // unique ID you generate
}

That covers what you need to do on the server side to accept background pushes on iOS. However, it is critically important that you continue reading as there will be a change in your on('notification'). When you receive a background push on iOS you will be given 30 seconds of time in which to complete a task. If you spend longer than 30 seconds on the task the OS may decide that your app is misbehaving and kill it. In order to signal iOS that your on('notification') handler is done you will need to call the new push.finish() method.

For example:

const push = PushNotification.init({
  ios: {
    sound: 'true',
    alert: 'true',
    badge: 'true',
    clearBadge: 'true'
  }
});

push.on('registration', data => {
  // send data.registrationId to push service
});

push.on('notification', data => {
  // do something with the push data
  // then call finish to let the OS know we are done
  push.finish(
    () => {
      console.log('processing of push data is finished');
    },
    () => {
      console.log(
        'something went wrong with push.finish for ID =',
        data.additionalData.notId
      );
    },
    data.additionalData.notId
  );
});

It is absolutely critical that you call push.finish() when you have successfully processed your background push data.

VoIP Notifications

VoIP Notifications are a type of iOS notifications that are always received and handled also when the app is closed or in background and consist only of payload data, so the developer is the responsible of handling the event and do whatever the aplication should do when receiving one of them. The cordova-plugin-local-notifications is a good complement for the VoIP feature.

In order to maintain the plugin data transfer standard, the payload sent to aps maintains the same structure as the one of common notifications with the consideration that the notification will be always be silent independently of the params that you pass to it.

The on('notification') event handler will always be called excepting if Background App Refresh is disabled on the user's iOS device. (Settings > General > Background App Refresh).

In order to set up your application with this type of notifications, refer to the API guide.

Action Buttons

Your notification can include action buttons. For iOS 8+ you must setup the possible actions when you initialize the plugin:

const push = PushNotification.init({
  ios: {
    sound: true,
    alert: true,
    badge: true,
    categories: {
      invite: {
        yes: {
          callback: 'accept',
          title: 'Accept',
          foreground: true,
          destructive: false
        },
        no: {
          callback: 'reject',
          title: 'Reject',
          foreground: true,
          destructive: false
        },
        maybe: {
          callback: 'maybe',
          title: 'Maybe',
          foreground: true,
          destructive: false
        }
      },
      delete: {
        yes: {
          callback: 'doDelete',
          title: 'Delete',
          foreground: true,
          destructive: true
        },
        no: {
          callback: 'cancel',
          title: 'Cancel',
          foreground: true,
          destructive: false
        }
      }
    }
  }
});

You’ll notice that we’ve added a new parameter to the iOS object of our init code called categories. Each category is a named object, invite and delete in this case. These names will need to match the one you send via your payload to APNS if you want the action buttons to be displayed. Each category can have up to three buttons which must be labeled yes, no and maybe. In turn each of these buttons has four properties, callback the javascript event you want to fired, title the label for the button, foreground whether or not to bring your app to the foreground and destructive which doesn’t actually do anything destructive it just colors the button red as a warning to the user that the action may be destructive.

Just like with background notifications it is absolutely critical that you call push.finish() when you have successfully processed the button callback. For instance you could setup three event listeners for the invite categories yes, no and maybe buttons:

push.on('accept', (data) => {
    // do something with the notification data

    push.finish(() => {
        console.log('accept callback finished');
    }, () => {
        console.log('accept callback failed');
    }, data.additionalData.notId);
};

push.on('reject', (data) => {
    // do something with the notification data

    push.finish(() => {
        console.log('accept callback finished');
    }, () => {
        console.log('accept callback failed');
    }, data.additionalData.notId);
};

push.on('maybe', (data) => {
    // do something with the notification data

    push.finish(() => {
        console.log('accept callback finished');
    }, () => {
        console.log('accept callback failed');
    }, data.additionalData.notId);
};

You may notice that the finish method now takes success, failure and id parameters. The id parameter let's the operating system know which background process to stop. You'll set it in the next step.

Then you will need to set the category value in your aps payload to match one of the objects in the categories object. As well you should set a notId property in the root of payload object. This is the parameter you pass to the finish method in order to tell the operating system that the processing of the push event is done.

{
  "aps": {
    "alert": "This is a notification that will be displayed ASAP.",
    "category": "invite"
  },
  "notId": "1"
}

This will produce the following notification in your tray:

push6-ios

If your users clicks on the main body of the notification your app will be opened. However, if they click on either of the action buttons the app will open (or start) and the specified JavaScript callback will be executed.

Action Buttons using FCM on iOS

If you are using FCM to send push messages on iOS you will need to send a different payload in order for the action buttons to be present in the notification shade. You'll need to use the click-action property in order to specify the category.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "notification": {
    "title": "AUX Scrum",
    "body": "Scrum: Daily touchbase @ 10am Please be on time so we can cover everything on the agenda.",
    "click-action": "invite"
  }
}

FCM and Additional Data

FCM on iOS is a different animal. The way you send data via FCM on Android is like:

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "data": {
    "title": "My Title",
    "message": "My message",
    "key1": "data 1",
    "key2": "data 2"
  }
}

will produce a notification event with the following data:

{
  "title": "My Title",
  "message": "My message",
  "additionalData": {
    "key1": "data 1",
    "key2": "data 2"
  }
}

but in order for the same notification event you would need to send your push to FCM iOS in a slight different format:

{
    "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
    "notification": {
        "title": "My Title",
    	"body": "My message"
    }
    "data": {
    	"key1": "data 1",
    	"key2": "data 2"
    }
}

The title and body need to be in the notification part of the payload in order for the OS to pick them up correctly. Everything else should be in the data part of the payload.

FCM Messages Not Arriving

For some users of the plugin they are unable to get messages sent via FCM to show up on their devices. If you are running into this issue try setting the priority of the message to high in the payload.

{
  "registration_ids": ["my device id"],
  "notification": {
    "title": "My Title",
    "body": "My message"
  },
  "priority": "high"
}

FCM Payload Details

Here's a sample JSON payload to send a push notification to an Android or iOS device using the FCM app server protocol:

{
	"to" : "bk3RNwTe3H0:CI2k_HHwgIpoDKCIZvvDMExUdFQ3P1...",
	/* To send a silent push, omit the entire notification section and send only data */
	"notification": {
		"title": "Test title", /* The notification's title */
		"body": "Test body.", /* The notification's body text */
		"subtitle": "Test subtitle", /* iOS: The notification's subtitle */
		"sound": "default", /* The sound to play when the device receives the notification */
		"tag": "1", /* Android: Group notifications with the same tag */
		"icon": "push_icon", /* Android: PNG icon from the res/drawable folder */
		"color": "#AABBCC" /* Android: Icon's background color in #RRGGBB format */
	},
	/* Optional payload that will be available from data.additionalData */
	"data": {
		"custom_var_1": "custom value here", /* Retrieved on app as data.additionalData.custom_var_1 */
		"custom_var_2:" "custom value here" /* Retrieved on app as data.additionalData.custom_var_2 */
	}
}

More information on how to send push notifications using the FCM HTTP protocol and payload details can be found here:

Windows Behaviour

Notifications

The plugin supports all types of windows platform notifications namely Tile, Toast, Badge and Raw. The API supports the basic cases of the notification templates with title corresponding to the first text element and message corresponding to the second if title is present else the first one. The image corresponds to the first image element of the notification xml.

The count is present only for the badge notification in which it represent the value of the notification which could be a number from 0-99 or a status glyph.

For advanced templates and usage, the notification object is included in data.additionalData.pushNotificationReceivedEventArgs.

Setting Toast Capable Option for Windows

This plugin automatically sets the toast capable flag to be true for Cordova 5.1.1+. For lower versions, you must declare that it is Toast Capable in your app's manifest file.

Disabling the default processing of notifications by Windows

The default handling can be disabled by setting the 'cancel' property in the notification object.

data.additionalData.pushNotificationReceivedEventArgs.cancel = true;

Background Notifications

On Windows, to trigger the on('notification') event handler when your app is in the background and it is launched through the push notification, you will have to include activation data in the payload of the notification. This is done by using the launch attribute, which can be any string that can be understood by the app. However it should not cause the XML payload to become invalid.

If you do not include a launch attribute string, your app will be launched normally, as though the user had launched it from the Start screen, and the notification event handler won't be called.

Here is an example of a sample toast notification payload containing the launch attribute:

<toast launch="{&quot;myContext&quot;:&quot;12345&quot;}">
    <visual>
        <binding template="ToastImageAndText01">
            <image id="1" src="ms-appx:///images/redWide.png" alt="red graphic"/>
            <text id="1">Hello World!</text>
        </binding>
    </visual>
</toast>

This launch attribute string is passed on to the app as data.launchArgs through the on('notification') handler. It's important to note that due to the Windows platform design, the other visual payload is not available to the handler on cold start. Notification attributes like message, title, etc., are available through the on('notification') handler when the app is running, and won't be available for background notifications.