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README.md

TTY::Table Gitter

Gem Version Build Status Code Climate Coverage Status Inline docs

A flexible and intuitive table formatting.

TTY::Table provides independent table formatting component for TTY toolkit.

Features

  • Table behaves like an array with familiar API see
  • Create table once and render using custom view renderers see
  • Rendering provides many display options see
  • Easy custom border creation see
  • Supports multibyte character encodings

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'tty-table'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install tty-table

Contents

1. Usage

First, provide TTY::Table with headers and data:

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1','header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]

Then simply call render on the instance with with border type as first argument:

table.render(:ascii)
# =>
#  +-------+-------+
#  |header1|header2|
#  +-------+-------+
#  |a1     |a2     |
#  +-------+-------+
#  |b1     |b2     |
#  +-------+-------+

2. Interface

2.1 Initialization

TTY::Table can be created in variety of ways. The easiest way is to pass 2-dimensional array:

table = TTY::Table[['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]
table = TTY::Table.new [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]
table = TTY::Table.new rows: [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]

Alternatively you can specify rows one by one inside block:

table = TTY::Table.new do |t|
  t << ['a1', 'a2']
  t << ['b1', 'b2']
end

You can add rows of data after initialization:

table = TTY::Table.new
table << ['a1','a2']
table << ['b1','b2']

In addition to rows you can specify table header:

table = TTY::Table.new ['h1', 'h2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]
table = TTY::Table.new header: ['h1', 'h2'], rows: [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]

or cross header with rows inside a hash like so

table = TTY::Table.new [{'h1' => ['a1', 'a2'], 'h2' => ['b1', 'b2']}]

2.2 Iteration

Table behaves like an Array so <<, each and familiar methods can be used:

table << ['a1', 'a2', 'a3']
table << ['b1', 'b2', 'b3']
table << ['a1', 'a2'] << ['b1', 'b2']  # chain rows assignment

In order to iterate over table rows including headers do:

table.each { |row| ... }                       # iterate over rows
table.each_with_index  { |row, index| ... }    # iterate over rows with an index

2.3 Access

In order to referene the row at index do:

table = TTY::Table.new [['a1','a2'], ['b1','b2']]
table[0]                    # => ['a1','a2']
table.row(0)                # => ['a1','a2']
table.row(i) { |row| ... }  # return array for row(i)

Negative indices count backwards from the end of table data (-1 is the last element):

table[-1]   # => ['b1','b2']

To reference element at given row(i) and column(j) do:

table[i, j]   # return element at row(i) and column(j)
table[0,0]    # => 'a1'

To specifically reference column(j) do:

table.column(j) { ... }   # return array for column(j)
table.column(0)           # => ['a1','b1']
table.column(name)        # return array for column(name), name of header

An IndexError is raised for indexes outside of data range.

2.4 Size

In order to query the number of rows, columns or size do:

table.rows_size        # return row size
table.columns_size     # return column size
table.size             # return an array of [row_size, column_size]

2.5 Orientation

3 Rendering

TTY-Table rendering process means you can create tabular data once and then create different renderers to match your needs for formatting the data.

3.1 Render

Given a table:

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1','header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]

Once you have an instance of TTY::Table you can decorate the content using the render method. In order to display a basic whitespace delimited view do:

table.render(:basic)
# =>
#  header1 header2
#  a1      a2
#  b1      b2

This will use so called :basic renderer with default options. The other renderers are :ascii and :unicode.

The render method can accept as a second argument the rendering options either as hash value:

table.render(:basic, alignments: [:left, :center])

or inside a block:

table.render(:basic) do |renderer|
  renderer.alignments= [:left, :center]
end

3.2 Renderer

TTY::Table has a definition of TTY::Table::Renderer which allows you to provide different view for your tabular data. It comes with few initial renderers built in such as TTY::Table::Renderer::Basic, TTY::Table::Renderer::ASCII and TTY::Table::Renderer:Unicode.

Given a table of data:

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1','header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]

You can create a special renderer for it:

multi_renderer = TTY::Table::Renderer::Basic.new(table, multiline: true)

and then call render

multi_renderer.render

This way, you create tabular data once and then create different renderers to match your needs for formatting the data.

3.2.1 Basic Renderer

The basic render allows for formatting table with whitespace without any border:

renderer = TTY::Table::Renderer::Basic.new(table)
renderer.render
# =>
#  header1 header2
#  a1      a2
#  b1      b2

This is the same as calling render directly on table:

table.render

3.2.2 ASCII Renderer

The ascii renderer allows for formatting table with ASCII type border.

Create an instance of ASCII renderer:

renderer = TTY::Table::Renderer::ASCII.new(table)

and then call render to get the formatted data:

renderer.render
# =>
#  +-------+-------+
#  |header1|header2|
#  +-------+-------+
#  |a1     |a2     |
#  |b1     |b2     |
#  +-------+-------+

This is the same as calling render directly on table instance with :ascii as the first argument:

table.render(:ascii)

3.2.3 Unicode Renderer

The uniocde renderer allows for formatting table with Unicode type border.

Create an instance of Unicode renderer:

renderer = TTY::Table::Renderer::Unicode.new(table)

and then call render to get the formatted data:

renderer.render
# =>
#  ┌───────┬───────┐
#  │header1│header2│
#  ├───────┼───────┤
#  │a1     │a2     │
#  │b1     │b2     │
#  └───────┴───────┘

This is the same as calling render directly on table instance with :unicode as the first argument:

table.render(:unicode)

3.3 Options

Rendering of TTY-Table includes numerous customization options:

alignments     # array of cell alignments out of :left, :center and :right,
               # default :left
border         # hash of border options - :characters, :style and :separator
border_class   # a type of border to use such as TTY::Table::Border::Null,
               # TTY::Table::Border::ASCII, TTY::Table::Border::Unicode
column_widths  # array of maximum column widths
filter         # a proc object that is applied to every field in a row
indent         # indentation applied to rendered table, by default 0
multiline      # if true will wrap text at new line or column width,
               # when false will escape special characters
padding        # array of integers to set table fields padding,
               # by default [0,0,0,0]
resize         # if true will expand/shrink table column sizes to match
               # the terminal width, otherwise if false will rotate
               # table vertically. By default set to false
width          # constrain the table total width, by default dynamically
               # calculated based on content and terminal size

The render method can accept as a second argument the above options either as hash value:

table.render(:basic, alignments: [:left, :center])

or inside a block:

table.render(:basic) do |renderer|
  renderer.alignments= [:left, :center]
end

3.4 Alignment

By default all columns are :left aligned.

You can align each column individuall by passing alignments option to table renderer:

table.render :ascii, alignments: [:center, :right]
# =>
#  +-------+-------+
#  |header1|header2|
#  +-------+-------+
#  |  a1   |     a2|
#  |  b1   |     b2|
#  +-------+-------+

Alternatively you can align all columns with alignment option:

table.render :ascii, alignment: [:center]
# =>
#  +-------+-------+
#  |header1|header2|
#  +-------+-------+
#  |  a1   |  a2   |
#  |  b1   |  b2   |
#  +-------+-------+

If you require a more granular alignment you can align individual fields in a row by passing :alignment option like so:

table = TTY::Table.new header: ['header1', 'header2']
table << [{value: 'a1', alignment: :right}, 'a2']
table << ['b1', {value: 'b2', alignment: :center}]

and then simply render:

table.render(:ascii)
# =>
#  +-------+-------+
#  |header1|header2|
#  +-------+-------+
#  |     a1|a2     |
#  |b1     |  b2   |
#  +-------+-------+

3.5 Border

To print border around data table you need to specify renderer type out of basic, ascii, unicode. By default basic is used. For instance, to output unicode border:

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1', 'header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']
table.render :unicode
# =>
#  ┌───────┬───────┐
#  │header1│header2│
#  ├───────┼───────┤
#  │a1     │a2     │
#  │b1     │b2     │
#  └───────┴───────┘

or by creating unicode renderer:

renderer = TTY::Table::Renderer::Unicode.new(table)
renderer.render

3.5.1 Parts

The following are available border parts:

Part ASCII Unicode
top -
top_mid +
top_left +
top_right +
bottom -
bottom_mid +
bottom_left +
bottom_right +
mid -
mid_mid +
mid_left +
mid_right +
left |
center |
right |

Using the above border parts you can create your own border with the border helper:

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1', 'header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']
table.render do |renderer|
  renderer.border do
    mid          '='
    mid_mid      ' '
  end
end
# =>
#  header1 header2
#  ======= =======
#  a1      a2
#  b1      b2

3.5.2 Custom

You can also create your own custom border by subclassing TTY::Table::Border and implementing the def_border method using internal DSL methods like so:

class MyBorder < TTY::Table::Border
  def_border do
    left         '$'
    center       '$'
    right        '$'
    bottom       ' '
    bottom_mid   '*'
    bottom_left  '*'
    bottom_right '*'
  end
end

Next pass the border class to your table instance render_with method

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1', 'header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']
table.render_with MyBorder
# =>
#  $header1$header2$
#  $a1     $a2     $
#  *       *       *

3.5.3 Separator

In addition to specifying border characters you can force table to render separator line on each row like:

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1', 'header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']]
table.render do |renderer|
  renderer.border.separator = :each_row
end
# =>
#  +-------+-------+
#  |header1|header2|
#  +-------+-------+
#  |a1     |a2     |
#  +-------+-------+
#  |b1     |b2     |
#  +-------+-------+

3.5.4 Style

If you want to change the display color of your border do:

table.render do |renderer|
  renderer.border.style = :green
end

All supported colors are provided by the Pastel dependency.

3.6 Filter

You can define filters that will modify individual table fields value before they are rendered. A filter can be a callable such as proc. Here's an example that formats

table = TTY::Table.new ['header1', 'header2'], [['a1', 'a2'], ['b1', 'b2']
table.render do |renderer|
  renderer.filter = Proc.new do |val, row_index, col_index|
    if col_index == 1 and !(row_index == 0)
      val.capitalize
    else
      val
    end
  end
end
# =>
#  +-------+-------+
#  |header1|header2|
#  +-------+-------+
#  |a1     |A2     |
#  +-------+-------+
#  |b1     |B2     |
#  +-------+-------+

To color even fields red on green background add filter like so

pastel = Pastel.new

table.render do |renderer|
  renderer.filter = proc do |val, row_index, col_index|
    col_index % 2 == 1 ? pastel.red.on_green(val) : val
  end
end

3.7 Multiline

Renderer options may include multiline parameter. When set to true, table fields will wrap at their natural line breaks or the column widths(if provided).

table = TTY::Table.new [ ["First", '1'], ["Multi\nLine\nContent", '2'], ["Third", '3']]
table.render :ascii, multiline: true
# =>
#  +-------+-+
#  |First  |1|
#  |Multi  |2|
#  |Line   | |
#  |Content| |
#  |Third  |3|
#  +-------+-+

When multiline is set to false, all line break characters will be escaped. In cases when the column widths are set, the content will be truncated.

table = TTY::Table.new [["First", '1'], ["Multiline\nContent", '2'], ["Third", '3']]
table.render :ascii, multiline: false
# =>
#  +------------------+-+
#  |First             |1|
#  |Multiline\nContent|2|
#  |Third             |3|
#  +------------------+-+

3.8 Padding

Renderer also accepts padding option which accepts array with arguments similar to CSS padding.

[2,2,2,2]  # => pad left and right with 2 characters, add 2 lines above and below
[1,2]      # => pad left and right with 2 characters, add 1 line above and below
1          # => pad left and right with 1 character, and 1 lines above and below

Therefore, to apply padding to the example table do:

table.render(:ascii, padding: [1,2,1,2])
# =>
#  +---------+---------+
#  |         |         |
#  | header1 | header2 |
#  |         |         |
#  +---------+---------+
#  |         |         |
#  | a1      | a2      |
#  |         |         |
#  |         |         |
#  | b1      | b2      |
#  |         |         |
#  +---------+---------+

However, when adding top or bottom padding to content with line breaks, the multiline option needs to be set to true to allow for rows to span multiple lines. For example:

table = TTY::Table.new header: ['head1', 'head2']
table << ["Multi\nLine", "Text\nthat\nwraps"]
table << ["Some\nother\ntext", 'Simple']

would render as:

table.render :ascii, multiline: true, padding: [1,2,1,2]
# =>
#  +---------+----------+
#  |         |          |
#  |  h1     |  head2   |
#  |         |          |
#  +---------+----------+
#  |         |          |
#  |  Multi  |  Text    |
#  |  Line   |  that    |
#  |         |  wraps   |
#  |         |          |
#  |         |          |
#  |  Some   |  Simple  |
#  |  other  |          |
#  |  text   |          |
#  |         |          |
#  +---------+----------+

3.9 Resize

3.10 Width

To control table's column sizes pass width, resize options. By default table's natural column widths are calculated from the content. If the total table width does not fit in terminal window then the table is rotated vertically to preserve content.

The resize property will force the table to expand/shrink to match the terminal width or custom width. On its own the width property will not resize table but only enforce table vertical rotation if content overspills.

header = ['h1', 'h2', 'h3']
rows   = [['aaa1', 'aa2', 'aaaaaaa3'], ['b1', 'b2', 'b3']]
table = TTY::Table.new header, rows
table.render width: 80, resize: true
# =>
#  +---------+-------+------------+
#  |h1       |h2     |h3          |
#  +---------+-------+------------+
#  |aaa1     |aa2    |aaaaaaa3    |
#  |b1       |b2     |b3          |
#  +---------+-------+------------+

Contributing

  1. Fork it ( https://github.com/piotrmurach/tty-table/fork )
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create a new Pull Request

This project is intended to be a safe, welcoming space for collaboration, and contributors are expected to adhere to the Contributor Covenant code of conduct.

Copyright

Copyright (c) 2015-2017 Piotr Murach. See LICENSE for further details.