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README.md

svelte-adapter

A simple utility that allows you to use Svelte components inside React or Vue components.

There is an adapter each for Vue and React which allows you to pass props and respond to events in a way that makes sense for that library.

This isn't a perfect solution, there are some limitations.


Install

With npm:

npm install svelte-adapter

Or with yarn:

yarn add svelte-adapter

Use it

Each 'adapter' is a simple function that takes a svelte component and a few options and returns a Vue or React component that can be used in Vue templates or JSX as you would expect. The returned components will always have a wrapper element, by default this is a <span> but it can be customised.

The adapters both have the same signature:

adapter(Component: SvelteComponent, styleObject?: object, wrapperElement?: string) : Component
  • Component should be a compiled svelte component, either precompiled or compiled as part of your build step using rollup-plugin-svelte for rollup or svelte-loader from webpack.
  • styleObject (optional) should be an object of styles that will be applied to the base elemement. This should be a valid JavaScript object with camelCased css property names. This defaults to an empty object.
  • wrapperElement (optional). All component have a base 'wrapper' element, by default this is a <span> but you can pass in a string to customise this behaviour (eg: 'div', 'li', etc.) If need a specific wrapper element but don't care about styles, you can simply pass an empty object as the styleObject.

In the examples below, the Svelte component we will be using is a simple component that accepts a prop that will be rendered and emits an event upon clicking a button.

<script>
  import { createEventDispatcher } from 'svelte';

  export let number = 0;
  const dispatch = createEventDispatcher();
</script>

<h1>{ number }</h1>
<button on:click={ () => dispatch('magicalclick') }>
  Click Me
</button>

Examples

React

Try it on codesandbox

The React-Svelte adapter is the default export from svelte-adpater/react.

The implementation of the React adapter uses hooks so you will need a recent version of React for this to work. If necessary I could add a class-based version at some stage.

Using the adaptor is very straight-forward, the adapter is a Higher Order Component that takes a Svelte component and returns a React component. The below example assumes your are compiling Svelte components as they are imported using webpack or rollup. If not, just import the compiled javascript file instead.

Svelte components can emit events which doesn't quite make sense in React. Any events emitted by the svelte component can be passed callbacks via an on* prop containing a function, this function will fire when the event is emitted. Any prop that starts with on followed by a capital letter is assumed to be an event and will be used to add a listener. onClick will fire the provided callback when 'click' events are emitted, onSomethingRandom will do the same for 'somethingRandom' events. This does not interfere with props that have the same naming convention, they will all be passed regardless.

Some Svelte component's allow you to bind to internal data which doesn't make too much sense outside of Svelte yet they often form an important part of the API. Instead I have added the option to use a watch* prop (similar to the on* prop). This also takes a callback function and recieves the value you wish to watch as its only argument. watchNumber={ n => setCount(n) } would watch the internal value number, when number changes the callback you passed to it would be executed receiving the new number value as its only argument.

This may seem strange but many Svelte components are written to make use of this bind syntax, without it there is often a hole in the API leaving you unable to respond to internal state changes. You will probably want to control your state with React, this watch* prop is an escape hatch that allows you to pull out those internal values to use however you wish.

Normal props behave as you would expect.

import React, { useState } from "react";
import toReact from "svelte-adapter/react";

import SvelteApp from "../App.svelte";

const baseStyle = {
  width: "50%"
};

const SvelteInReact = toReact(SvelteApp, baseStyle, "div");

const App = () => {
  const [count, setCount] = useState(10);

  const handleClick = () => setCount(prevCount => prevCount + 1);

  return (
    <div>
      <SvelteInReact
        number={count}
        onMagicalclick={handleClick}
        watchNumber={n => setCount(n)}
      />
      <button onClick={handleClick}>Increment - {count}</button>
    </div>
  );
};

Vue

Try it on codesandbox

The Vue-Svelte adapter is the default export from svelte-adpater/vue.

Using the adapter is very straight-forward, the adapter is a Higher Order Component that takes a Svelte component and returns a Vue component. The below example assumes your are compiling Svelte components as they are imported using webpack or rollup. If not, just import the compiled javascript file instead.

Since Vue has an event mechanism similar to Svelte, event directives can be used as expected. v-on:* or @* directives will listen for the matching events on the Svelte component. v-on:click or @click will fire the provided callback when 'click' events are emitted, v-on:somethingRandom or @somethingrandom will do the same for 'somethingRandom' events. Other props behave as you would expect.

Some Svelte component's allow you to bind to internal data which doesn't make too much sense outside of Svelte yet they often form an important part of the API. I have added the option to use a @watch:* prop (similar to the @:* prop). This also takes a callback function and recieves the value you wish to watch as its only argument. @watch:number="setCount" would watch the internal value number, when number changes the callback you passed to it would be executed receiving the new number value as its only argument.

This may seem strange but many Svelte components are written to make use of this bind syntax, without it there is often a hole in the API leaving you unable to respond to internal state changes. You will probably want to control your state in a Vue component, this @watch:* prop is an escape hatch that allows you to pull out those internal values to use however you wish.

Normal props behave as expected.

<template>
  <div>
    <SvelteInVue
      :number="count"
      @magicalclick="handleClick"
      @watch:number="setCount"
    />
    <button @click="handleClick">Increment - {{ count }}</button>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
import SvelteApp from "../App.svelte";
import toVue from "svelte-adapter/vue";

const baseStyle = {
  width: "50%"
};

export default {
  components: {
    SvelteInVue: toVue(SvelteApp, baseStyle, "div")
  },
  data() {
    return {
      count: 0
    };
  },
  methods: {
    handleClick() {
      this.count += 1;
    },
    setCount(n) {
      this.count = n;
    }
  }
};
</script>

Limitations

While everything should work in most situations, it is not currently possible to pass children or slots to Svelte components with these adapters.

This won't work with any of the adpaters:

<SvelteComponent>
  <p>Hello</p>
</SvelteComponent>

There may be more limitations that I am unaware of, this package is really just intended a simple way to use Svelte and should work most of the time. The code is short and simple, if you have specific needs you will probably be better off writing something custom for your application.

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