Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP
tag: REL8_0_22

Fetching latest commit…

Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time

..
Failed to load latest commit information.
Makefile
README.oid2name
oid2name.c

README.oid2name

This utility allows administrators to examine the file structure used by
PostgreSQL.  To make use of it, you need to be familiar with the file
structure, which is described in the "Database File Layout" chapter of
the "Internals" section of the PostgreSQL documentation.

Oid2name connects to the database and extracts OID, filenode, and table
name information.  You can also have it show database OIDs and tablespace
OIDs.

When displaying specific tables, you can select which tables to show by
using -o, -f and -t.  The first switch takes an OID, the second takes
a filenode, and the third takes a tablename (actually, it's a LIKE
pattern, so you can use things like "foo%").  Note that you can use as many
of these switches as you like, and the listing will include all objects
matched by any of the switches.  Also note that these switches can only
show objects in the database given in -d.

If you don't give any of -o, -f or -t it will dump all the tables in the
database given in -d.  If you don't give -d, it will show a database
listing.  Alternatively you can give -s to get a tablespace listing.

Additional switches:
	-i	include indexes and sequences in the database listing.
	-x	display more information about each object shown:
		tablespace name, schema name, OID.
	-S	also show system objects
		(those in information_schema, pg_toast and pg_catalog schemas)
	-q	don't display headers
		(useful for scripting)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sample session:

$ oid2name
All databases:
    Oid  Database Name  Tablespace
----------------------------------
  17228       alvherre  pg_default
  17255     regression  pg_default
  17227      template0  pg_default
      1      template1  pg_default

$ oid2name -s
All tablespaces:
     Oid  Tablespace Name
-------------------------
    1663       pg_default
    1664        pg_global
  155151         fastdisk
  155152          bigdisk

$ cd $PGDATA/17228

$ # get top 10 db objects in the default tablespace, ordered by size
$ ls -lS * | head -10
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre 136536064 sep 14 09:51 155173
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre  17965056 sep 14 09:51 1155291
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre   1204224 sep 14 09:51 16717
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre    581632 sep  6 17:51 1255
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre    237568 sep 14 09:50 16674
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre    212992 sep 14 09:51 1249
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre    204800 sep 14 09:51 16684
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre    196608 sep 14 09:50 16700
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre    163840 sep 14 09:50 16699
-rw-------  1 alvherre alvherre    122880 sep  6 17:51 16751

$ oid2name -d alvherre -f 155173
From database "alvherre":
  Filenode  Table Name
----------------------
    155173    accounts

$ # you can ask for more than one object
$ oid2name -d alvherre -f 155173 -f 1155291
From database "alvherre":
  Filenode     Table Name
-------------------------
    155173       accounts
   1155291  accounts_pkey

$ # you can also mix the options, and have more details
$ oid2name -d alvherre -t accounts -f 1155291 -x
From database "alvherre":
  Filenode     Table Name      Oid  Schema  Tablespace
------------------------------------------------------
    155173       accounts   155173  public  pg_default
   1155291  accounts_pkey  1155291  public  pg_default

$ # show disk space for every db object
$ du [0-9]* |
> while read SIZE FILENODE
> do
>   echo "$SIZE       `oid2name -q -d alvherre -i -f $FILENODE`"
> done
16 	   1155287  branches_pkey
16 	   1155289  tellers_pkey
17561 	   1155291  accounts_pkey
...

$ # same, but sort by size
$ du [0-9]* | sort -rn | while read SIZE FN
> do
>   echo "$SIZE   `oid2name -q -d alvherre -f $FN`"
> done
133466 	    155173    accounts
17561 	   1155291  accounts_pkey
1177 	     16717  pg_proc_proname_args_nsp_index
...

$ # If you want to see what's in tablespaces, use the pg_tblspc directory
$ cd $PGDATA/pg_tblspc
$ oid2name -s
All tablespaces:
     Oid  Tablespace Name
-------------------------
    1663       pg_default
    1664        pg_global
  155151         fastdisk
  155152          bigdisk

$ # what databases have objects in tablespace "fastdisk"?
$ ls -d 155151/*
155151/17228/  155151/PG_VERSION

$ # Oh, what was database 17228 again?
$ oid2name   
All databases:
    Oid  Database Name  Tablespace
----------------------------------
  17228       alvherre  pg_default
  17255     regression  pg_default
  17227      template0  pg_default
      1      template1  pg_default

$ # Let's see what objects does this database have in the tablespace.
$ cd 155151/17228
$ ls -l
total 0
-rw-------  1 postgres postgres 0 sep 13 23:20 155156

$ # OK, this is a pretty small table ... but which one is it?
$ oid2name -d alvherre -f 155156
From database "alvherre":
  Filenode  Table Name
----------------------
    155156         foo

$ # end of sample session.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

You can also get approximate size data for each object using psql.  For
example,

SELECT relpages, relfilenode, relname FROM pg_class ORDER BY relpages DESC;

Each page is typically 8k.  Relpages is updated by VACUUM.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mail me with any problems or additions you would like to see.  Clearing 
house for the code will be at:  http://www.crimelabs.net

b. palmer, bpalmer@crimelabs.net
Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.