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Research on static site generators, builders, and toolkits
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README.md

README.md

Static Site Generators and Toolkits

My ongoing research on static site generators, builders, and toolkits.

Introduction

What are static sites generators?

Let me try:

A toolkit that pre-processes assets (css, images, fonts) and plaintext, adds html templates (compiled or as-is), provides configurable logic for them to link together, statically, as a standalone website.

With static sites you don't need a database or server. You don't have to worry about css attacks. You can even configure your assets through a CDN. What's more, servers love them.

They serve them for free.

However, they come in several languages. What you choose depends on your comfort, your taste, whether you're a developer or a designer. There's no good answer for "what's a good static site generator", the same way there isn't a good answer for "what's a vegan cafe in San Francisco."

To know what's good for me, I tell myself: let me try it.

How to choose

Use it. Change it. Write your own.

I did.

What I learned about static sites (so far, at least):

Minimalist

Basic. Logic-less. File based.

Best for users getting rid of cms in search of simplicity.

Git: Toto, Javascript: Wintersmith, etc.,

Good intentions

Simple, yet flexible with some options. Most popular to solve "the 80%".

Best for designers comfortable with basic programming skills, and developers who want a boilerplate to configure.

Ruby: Jekyll*, Python: Frozen-Flask, Liquidluck, Javascript: Hammer, etc.,

Fullstack

Cover a range of workflows, templating languages, markups, pre-processors that hack the hell out of your content with plugins.

Best for programmers who like to modify, integrate, and connect the missing dots with code.

Ruby: Middleman, Python: Hyde, Javascript: Docpad*, etc.,

Odd, but good

PieCrust, Punch.

References

  1. The mother of all lists
  2. 32 Static Website Generators
  3. Hacking up sites with Middleman
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