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Correct message for not staged files.

In new Git, message "Changed but not updated" was replaced with
"Changes not staged for commit".
See: git/git@8009d83
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1 parent be143fd commit 6300a6fd4b17d53dfe9ce2a4ce38056a44d2ce4d @onovy onovy committed Dec 21, 2012
Showing with 374 additions and 374 deletions.
  1. +10 −10 ar/02-git-basics/01-chapter2.markdown
  2. +1 −1 ar/03-git-branching/01-chapter3.markdown
  3. +5 −5 ar/06-git-tools/01-chapter6.markdown
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  5. +1 −1 az/03-git-branching/01-chapter3.markdown
  6. +5 −5 az/06-git-tools/01-chapter6.markdown
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  10. +5 −5 ca/06-git-tools/01-chapter6.markdown
  11. +11 −11 cs/02-git-basics/01-chapter2.markdown
  12. +1 −1 cs/03-git-branching/01-chapter3.markdown
  13. +5 −5 cs/06-git-tools/01-chapter6.markdown
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@@ -102,13 +102,13 @@ Let’s change a file that was already tracked. If you change a previously track
#
# new file: README
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
-The benchmarks.rb file appears under a section named “Changed but not updated” — which means that a file that is tracked has been modified in the working directory but not yet staged. To stage it, you run the `git add` command (it’s a multipurpose command — you use it to begin tracking new files, to stage files, and to do other things like marking merge-conflicted files as resolved). Let’s run `git add` now to stage the benchmarks.rb file, and then run `git status` again:
+The benchmarks.rb file appears under a section named “Changes not staged for commit” — which means that a file that is tracked has been modified in the working directory but not yet staged. To stage it, you run the `git add` command (it’s a multipurpose command — you use it to begin tracking new files, to stage files, and to do other things like marking merge-conflicted files as resolved). Let’s run `git add` now to stage the benchmarks.rb file, and then run `git status` again:
$ git add benchmarks.rb
$ git status
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ Both files are staged and will go into your next commit. At this point, suppose
# new file: README
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
@@ -190,7 +190,7 @@ Let’s say you edit and stage the README file again and then edit the benchmark
#
# new file: README
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
@@ -245,7 +245,7 @@ For another example, if you stage the benchmarks.rb file and then edit it, you c
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
@@ -326,7 +326,7 @@ Although it can be amazingly useful for crafting commits exactly how you want th
$ git status
# On branch master
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
@@ -340,13 +340,13 @@ Notice how you don’t have to run `git add` on the benchmarks.rb file in this c
To remove a file from Git, you have to remove it from your tracked files (more accurately, remove it from your staging area) and then commit. The `git rm` command does that and also removes the file from your working directory so you don’t see it as an untracked file next time around.
-If you simply remove the file from your working directory, it shows up under the “Changed but not updated” (that is, _unstaged_) area of your `git status` output:
+If you simply remove the file from your working directory, it shows up under the “Changes not staged for commit” (that is, _unstaged_) area of your `git status` output:
$ rm grit.gemspec
$ git status
# On branch master
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# deleted: grit.gemspec
@@ -671,7 +671,7 @@ Right below the “Changes to be committed” text, it says use `git reset HEAD
#
# modified: README.txt
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -684,7 +684,7 @@ The command is a bit strange, but it works. The benchmarks.rb file is modified b
What if you realize that you don’t want to keep your changes to the benchmarks.rb file? How can you easily unmodify it — revert it back to what it looked like when you last committed (or initially cloned, or however you got it into your working directory)? Luckily, `git status` tells you how to do that, too. In the last example output, the unstaged area looks like this:
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ Git hasn’t automatically created a new merge commit. It has paused the process
[master*]$ git status
index.html: needs merge
# On branch master
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -422,7 +422,7 @@ To demonstrate, you’ll go into your project and start working on a couple of f
#
# modified: index.html
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: lib/simplegit.rb
@@ -453,7 +453,7 @@ In this case, two stashes were done previously, so you have access to three diff
$ git stash apply
# On branch master
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: index.html
@@ -471,7 +471,7 @@ The changes to your files were reapplied, but the file you staged before wasn’
#
# modified: index.html
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: lib/simplegit.rb
@@ -517,7 +517,7 @@ If you stash some work, leave it there for a while, and continue on the branch f
#
# modified: index.html
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: lib/simplegit.rb
@@ -941,7 +941,7 @@ Now your `rack` subdirectory is at the exact state it was in when you committed
1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-)
[master*]$ git status
# On branch master
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -101,13 +101,13 @@ Let’s change a file that was already tracked. If you change a previously track
#
# new file: README
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
-The `benchmarks.rb` file appears under a section named “Changed but not updated” — which means that a file that is tracked has been modified in the working directory but not yet staged. To stage it, you run the `git add` command (it’s a multipurpose command — you use it to begin tracking new files, to stage files, and to do other things like marking merge-conflicted files as resolved). Let’s run `git add` now to stage the `benchmarks.rb` file, and then run `git status` again:
+The `benchmarks.rb` file appears under a section named “Changes not staged for commit” — which means that a file that is tracked has been modified in the working directory but not yet staged. To stage it, you run the `git add` command (it’s a multipurpose command — you use it to begin tracking new files, to stage files, and to do other things like marking merge-conflicted files as resolved). Let’s run `git add` now to stage the `benchmarks.rb` file, and then run `git status` again:
$ git add benchmarks.rb
$ git status
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ Both files are staged and will go into your next commit. At this point, suppose
# new file: README
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ Let’s say you edit and stage the `README` file again and then edit the `benchm
#
# new file: README
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
@@ -244,7 +244,7 @@ For another example, if you stage the `benchmarks.rb` file and then edit it, you
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
@@ -325,7 +325,7 @@ Although it can be amazingly useful for crafting commits exactly how you want th
$ git status
# On branch master
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
@@ -339,13 +339,13 @@ Notice how you don’t have to run `git add` on the `benchmarks.rb` file in this
To remove a file from Git, you have to remove it from your tracked files (more accurately, remove it from your staging area) and then commit. The `git rm` command does that and also removes the file from your working directory so you don’t see it as an untracked file next time around.
-If you simply remove the file from your working directory, it shows up under the “Changed but not updated” (that is, _unstaged_) area of your `git status` output:
+If you simply remove the file from your working directory, it shows up under the “Changes not staged for commit” (that is, _unstaged_) area of your `git status` output:
$ rm grit.gemspec
$ git status
# On branch master
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# deleted: grit.gemspec
@@ -670,7 +670,7 @@ Right below the “Changes to be committed” text, it says "use `git reset HEAD
#
# modified: README.txt
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -683,7 +683,7 @@ The command is a bit strange, but it works. The `benchmarks.rb` file is modified
What if you realize that you don’t want to keep your changes to the `benchmarks.rb` file? How can you easily unmodify it — revert it back to what it looked like when you last committed (or initially cloned, or however you got it into your working directory)? Luckily, `git status` tells you how to do that, too. In the last example output, the unstaged area looks like this:
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ Git hasn’t automatically created a new merge commit. It has paused the process
[master*]$ git status
index.html: needs merge
# On branch master
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -422,7 +422,7 @@ To demonstrate, you’ll go into your project and start working on a couple of f
#
# modified: index.html
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: lib/simplegit.rb
@@ -453,7 +453,7 @@ In this case, two stashes were done previously, so you have access to three diff
$ git stash apply
# On branch master
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: index.html
@@ -471,7 +471,7 @@ The changes to your files were reapplied, but the file you staged before wasn’
#
# modified: index.html
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: lib/simplegit.rb
@@ -517,7 +517,7 @@ If you stash some work, leave it there for a while, and continue on the branch f
#
# modified: index.html
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: lib/simplegit.rb
@@ -941,7 +941,7 @@ Now your `rack` subdirectory is at the exact state it was in when you committed
1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-)
[master*]$ git status
# On branch master
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -101,13 +101,13 @@ Let’s change a file that was already tracked. If you change a previously track
#
# new file: README
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
-The `benchmarks.rb` file appears under a section named “Changed but not updated” — which means that a file that is tracked has been modified in the working directory but not yet staged. To stage it, you run the `git add` command (it’s a multipurpose command — you use it to begin tracking new files, to stage files, and to do other things like marking merge-conflicted files as resolved). Let’s run `git add` now to stage the `benchmarks.rb` file, and then run `git status` again:
+The `benchmarks.rb` file appears under a section named “Changes not staged for commit” — which means that a file that is tracked has been modified in the working directory but not yet staged. To stage it, you run the `git add` command (it’s a multipurpose command — you use it to begin tracking new files, to stage files, and to do other things like marking merge-conflicted files as resolved). Let’s run `git add` now to stage the `benchmarks.rb` file, and then run `git status` again:
$ git add benchmarks.rb
$ git status
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ Both files are staged and will go into your next commit. At this point, suppose
# new file: README
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ Let’s say you edit and stage the `README` file again and then edit the `benchm
#
# new file: README
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
@@ -244,7 +244,7 @@ For another example, if you stage the `benchmarks.rb` file and then edit it, you
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
@@ -325,7 +325,7 @@ Although it can be amazingly useful for crafting commits exactly how you want th
$ git status
# On branch master
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
#
# modified: benchmarks.rb
#
@@ -339,13 +339,13 @@ Notice how you don’t have to run `git add` on the `benchmarks.rb` file in this
To remove a file from Git, you have to remove it from your tracked files (more accurately, remove it from your staging area) and then commit. The `git rm` command does that and also removes the file from your working directory so you don’t see it as an untracked file next time around.
-If you simply remove the file from your working directory, it shows up under the “Changed but not updated” (that is, _unstaged_) area of your `git status` output:
+If you simply remove the file from your working directory, it shows up under the “Changes not staged for commit” (that is, _unstaged_) area of your `git status` output:
$ rm grit.gemspec
$ git status
# On branch master
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#
# deleted: grit.gemspec
@@ -670,7 +670,7 @@ Right below the “Changes to be committed” text, it says "use `git reset HEAD
#
# modified: README.txt
#
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
@@ -683,7 +683,7 @@ The command is a bit strange, but it works. The `benchmarks.rb` file is modified
What if you realize that you don’t want to keep your changes to the `benchmarks.rb` file? How can you easily unmodify it — revert it back to what it looked like when you last committed (or initially cloned, or however you got it into your working directory)? Luckily, `git status` tells you how to do that, too. In the last example output, the unstaged area looks like this:
- # Changed but not updated:
+ # Changes not staged for commit:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
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