small improvements to introduction #193

Closed
wants to merge 1 commit into
from

Projects

None yet

3 participants

@dominiqueplante

...u have to be online to do a lot of version control related things with SVN or similar systems. You don't for Git

@dominiqueplante dominiqueplante small formatting improvements, expand on why Git is better than SVN -…
… you have to be online to do a lot of version control related things with SVN or similar systems. You don't for Git
859f7fc
@jnavila jnavila commented on the diff Nov 1, 2012
en/01-introduction/01-chapter1.markdown
@@ -28,7 +32,7 @@ Figure 1-2. Centralized version control diagram.
This setup offers many advantages, especially over local VCSs. For example, everyone knows to a certain degree what everyone else on the project is doing. Administrators have fine-grained control over who can do what; and it’s far easier to administer a CVCS than it is to deal with local databases on every client.
-However, this setup also has some serious downsides. The most obvious is the single point of failure that the centralized server represents. If that server goes down for an hour, then during that hour nobody can collaborate at all or save versioned changes to anything they’re working on. If the hard disk the central database is on becomes corrupted, and proper backups haven’t been kept, you lose absolutely everything—the entire history of the project except whatever single snapshots people happen to have on their local machines. Local VCS systems suffer from this same problem—whenever you have the entire history of the project in a single place, you risk losing everything.
+However, this setup also has some serious downsides. The most obvious is the single point of failure that the centralized server represents. If that server goes down for an hour, then during that hour nobody can collaborate at all or save versioned changes to anything they’re working on. If the hard disk the central database is on becomes corrupted, and proper backups haven’t been kept, you lose absolutely everything—the entire history of the project except whatever single snapshots people happen to have on their local machines. Local VCS systems suffer from this same problem—whenever you have the entire history of the project in a single place, you risk losing everything. To take full advantage of these centralized servers, you must also be online. You can't do commits, view history on a file, or do other interesting source control related operations when you are offline. However, with Git, most of the useful source control operations you would want to do are available even when you are offline.
@jnavila
jnavila Nov 1, 2012 Member

Not sure this is the right place to start talking about the advantages of distributed version control. It is the next section's content.

And I think it is too early to start introducing the word "commit"

@zachlatta

This change seems redundant. "If that server goes down for an hour, then during that hour nobody can collaborate at all or save versioned changes" seems to cover what's added.

@jnavila jnavila closed this Sep 8, 2013
Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment