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Reverse-engineered driver for the AMC2500 PCB engraver controller (w/ QuickCircuit 5000)
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README.md
amc2500.py
engrave_gcode.py
gcode_optimise.py
gcode_parse.py
gcode_preview.py
jogger.py
tests.py

README.md

This is a rough attempt at working with the AMC2500 stepper controller via a serial port, from Python code.

amc2500 is a simple Python module for sending commands to the controller gcode is a parser for a simple subset of gcode (aiming for the commands used by Inkscape gcodetools) jogger is a hacky WX widgets interface to get the contoller moving about

It's all implemented via sniffing the serial protocol, unsupported, and may never work properly (looks like we may be removing the AMC2500 from our PCB Engraver and driving it directly from EMC via parallel port.)

NOTICE

This project is no longer maintained as I moved away from the city (Canberra) where I had access to the QuickCircuit (it belongs to Make Hack Void hackerspace). @devdsp, who also did some of the original hacking, may still be interested in it.

Make Hack Void has a wiki page about the QuickCircuit, also.

The code in the master branch here includes a Python file, engrave_gcode.py, which is an interactive console program that has been successfully used to make some simple circuit boards from the output of the pcb2gcode script. Pics:

Engraved PCB heated bed

Engraving a shield

engrave_gcode.py is not a polished end user experience, and probably only usable if you read the Python code first to get a rough idea what it's about to do.

The is a second branch, "old_ui", that contains a GUI that never quite worked beyond simple manual movements.

I don't really recommend anyone uses any of this. If you don't have access to the "QuickCircuit" software, then reverse engineering the controller box to drive the stepper motors directly will let you use something like LinuxCNC or GRBL and then you can borrow on all of the accumulated community knowledge and existing documentation for these processes, instead of talking to a relatively rare custom controller. The wiki page linked above has a link to some plug-in interposer boards to drive the steppers on the controller (designed by Alastair D'Silva), although I don't think these were ever tested.

That all said, if you are interested in taking over this project (or you have questions I might be able to answer), please let me know.

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