Pusher Websocket library for Swift | owner=@hamchapman
Swift Objective-C Ruby
Latest commit b9abf1f Nov 22, 2016 @hamchapman hamchapman committed on GitHub Merge pull request #110 from BasThomas/patch-1
Update link to macOS example

README.md

PusherSwift (pusher-websocket-swift) (also works with Objective-C!)

Build Status Languages Platform Cocoapods Compatible Carthage Compatible Twitter GitHub license

Supports iOS, macOS (OS X) and tvOS! (Hopefully watchOS soon!)

I just want to copy and paste some code to get me started

What else would you want? Head over to one of our example apps:

Table of Contents

Installation

CocoaPods

CocoaPods is a dependency manager for Cocoa projects and is our recommended method of installing PusherSwift and its dependencies.

If you don't already have the Cocoapods gem installed, run the following command:

$ gem install cocoapods

To integrate PusherSwift into your Xcode project using CocoaPods, specify it in your Podfile:

source 'https://github.com/CocoaPods/Specs.git'
platform :ios, '10.0'
use_frameworks!

pod 'PusherSwift'

Then, run the following command:

$ pod install

If you find that you're not having the most recent version installed when you run pod install then try running:

$ pod cache clean
$ pod repo update PusherSwift
$ pod install

Also you'll need to make sure that you've not got the version of PusherSwift locked to an old version in your Podfile.lock file.

Carthage

Carthage is a decentralized dependency manager that automates the process of adding frameworks to your Cocoa application.

You can install Carthage with Homebrew using the following command:

$ brew update
$ brew install carthage

To integrate PusherSwift into your Xcode project using Carthage, specify it in your Cartfile:

github "pusher/pusher-websocket-swift"

Configuration

There are a number of configuration parameters which can be set for the Pusher client. For Swift usage they are:

  • authMethod (AuthMethod) - the method you would like the client to use to authenticate subscription requests to channels requiring authentication (see below for more details)
  • attemptToReturnJSONObject (Bool) - whether or not you'd like the library to try and parse your data as JSON (or not, and just return a string)
  • encrypted (Bool) - whether or not you'd like to use encypted transport or not, default is true
  • autoReconnect (Bool) - set whether or not you'd like the library to try and autoReconnect upon disconnection
  • host (PusherHost) - set a custom value for the host you'd like to connect to, e.g. PusherHost.host("ws-test.pusher.com")
  • port (Int) - set a custom value for the port that you'd like to connect to

The authMethod parameter must be of the type AuthMethod. This is an enum defined as:

public enum AuthMethod {
    case endpoint(authEndpoint: String)
    case authRequestBuilder(authRequestBuilder: AuthRequestBuilderProtocol)
    case inline(secret: String)
    case noMethod
}
  • endpoint(authEndpoint: String) - the client will make a POST request to the endpoint you specify with the socket ID of the client and the channel name attempting to be subscribed to
  • authRequestBuilder(authRequestBuilder: AuthRequestBuilderProtocol) - you specify an object that conforms to the AuthRequestBuilderProtocol (defined below), which must generate an NSURLRequest object that will be used to make the auth request
  • inline(secret: String) - your app's secret so that authentication requests do not need to be made to your authentication endpoint and instead subscriptions can be authenticated directly inside the library (this is mainly desgined to be used for development)
  • noMethod - if you are only using public channels then you do not need to set an authMethod (this is the default value)

This is the AuthRequestBuilderProtocol definition:

public protocol AuthRequestBuilderProtocol {
    func requestFor(socketID: String, channelName: String) -> URLRequest?

    // DEPRECATED
    func requestFor(socketID: String, channel: PusherChannel) -> NSMutableURLRequest?
}

Note that if you want to specify the cluster to which you want to connect then you use the host property as follows:

Swift

let options = PusherClientOptions(
    host: .cluster("eu")
)

Objective-C

OCAuthMethod *authMethod = [[OCAuthMethod alloc] initWithAuthEndpoint:@"https://your.authendpoint/pusher/auth"];
OCPusherHost *host = [[OCPusherHost alloc] initWithCluster:@"eu"];
PusherClientOptions *options = [[PusherClientOptions alloc]
                                initWithOcAuthMethod:authMethod
                                attemptToReturnJSONObject:YES
                                autoReconnect:YES
                                ocHost:host
                                port:nil
                                encrypted:YES];

All of these configuration options need to be passed to a PusherClientOptions object, which in turn needs to be passed to the Pusher object, when instantiating it, for example:

Swift

let options = PusherClientOptions(
    authMethod: .endpoint(authEndpoint: "http://localhost:9292/pusher/auth")
)

let pusher = Pusher(key: "APP_KEY", options: options)

Objective-C

OCAuthMethod *authMethod = [[OCAuthMethod alloc] initWithAuthEndpoint:@"https://your.authendpoint/pusher/auth"];
OCPusherHost *host = [[OCPusherHost alloc] initWithCluster:@"eu"];
PusherClientOptions *options = [[PusherClientOptions alloc]
                                initWithOcAuthMethod:authMethod
                                attemptToReturnJSONObject:YES
                                autoReconnect:YES
                                ocHost:host
                                port:nil
                                encrypted:YES];
pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY" options:options];

As you may have noticed, this differs slightly for Objective-C usage. The main changes are that you need to use OCAuthMethod and OCPusherHost in place of AuthMethod and PusherHost. The OCAuthMethod class has the following functions that you can call in your Objective-C code.

public init(authEndpoint: String)

public init(authRequestBuilder: AuthRequestBuilderProtocol)

public init(secret: String)

public init()
OCAuthMethod *authMethod = [[OCAuthMethod alloc] initWithSecret:@"YOUR_APP_SECRET"];
PusherClientOptions *options = [[PusherClientOptions alloc] initWithAuthMethod:authMethod];

The case is similar for OCPusherHost. You have the following functions available:

public init(host: String)

public init(cluster: String)
[[OCPusherHost alloc] initWithCluster:@"YOUR_CLUSTER_SHORTCODE"];

Authenticated channel example:

Swift

class AuthRequestBuilder: AuthRequestBuilderProtocol {
    func requestFor(socketID: String, channelName: String) -> URLRequest? {
        var request = URLRequest(url: URL(string: "http://localhost:9292/builder")!)
        request.httpMethod = "POST"
        request.httpBody = "socket_id=\(socketID)&channel_name=\(channel.name)".data(using: String.Encoding.utf8)
        request.addValue("myToken", forHTTPHeaderField: "Authorization")
        return request
    }
}

let options = PusherClientOptions(
    authMethod: AuthMethod.authRequestBuilder(authRequestBuilder: AuthRequestBuilder())
)
let pusher = Pusher(
  key: "APP_KEY",
  options: options
)

Objective-C

@interface AuthRequestBuilder : NSObject <AuthRequestBuilderProtocol>

- (NSURLRequest *)requestForSocketID:(NSString *)socketID channelName:(NSString *)channelName;

@end

@implementation AuthRequestBuilder

- (NSURLRequest *)requestForSocketID:(NSString *)socketID channelName:(NSString *)channelName {
    NSURLRequest *request = [[NSURLRequest alloc] initWithURL:[[NSURL alloc] initWithString:@"http://localhost:9292/pusher/auth"]];
    NSMutableURLRequest *mutableRequest = [[NSMutableURLRequest alloc] initWithURL: [[NSURL alloc] initWithString:@"http://localhost:9292/pusher/auth"]];

    NSString *dataStr = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"socket_id=%@&channel_name=%@", socketID, channelName];
    NSData *data = [dataStr dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
    mutableRequest.HTTPBody = data;
    mutableRequest.HTTPMethod = @"POST";
    [mutableRequest addValue:@"myToken" forHTTPHeaderField:@"Authorization"];

    request = [mutableRequest copy];

    return request;
}

@end

OCAuthMethod *authMethod = [[OCAuthMethod alloc] initWithAuthRequestBuilder:[[AuthRequestBuilder alloc] init]];
PusherClientOptions *options = [[PusherClientOptions alloc] initWithAuthMethod:authMethod];

Where "Authorization" and "myToken" are the field and value your server is expecting in the headers of the request.

Connection

A Websocket connection is established by providing your API key to the constructor function:

Swift

let pusher = Pusher(key: "APP_KEY")
pusher.connect()

Objective-C

Pusher *pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];
[pusher connect];

This returns a client object which can then be used to subscribe to channels and then calling connect() triggers the connection process to start.

You can also set a userDataFetcher on the connection object.

  • userDataFetcher (() -> PusherPresenceChannelMember) - if you are subscribing to an authenticated channel and wish to provide a function to return user data

You set it like this:

Swift

let pusher = Pusher(key: "APP_KEY")

pusher.connection.userDataFetcher = { () -> PusherPresenceChannelMember in
    return PusherPresenceChannelMember(userId: "123", userInfo: ["twitter": "hamchapman"])
}

Objective-C

Pusher *pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];

pusher.connection.userDataFetcher = ^PusherPresenceChannelMember* () {
    NSString *uuid = [[NSUUID UUID] UUIDString];
    return [[PusherPresenceChannelMember alloc] initWithUserId:uuid userInfo:nil];
};

Connection delegate

There is a PusherDelegate that you can use to get notified of connection-related information. These are the functions that you can optionally implement when conforming to the PusherDelegate protocol:

@objc optional func changedConnectionState(from old: ConnectionState, to new: ConnectionState)
@objc optional func subscribedToChannel(name: String)
@objc optional func failedToSubscribeToChannel(name: String, response: URLResponse?, data: String?, error: NSError?)
@objc optional func debugLog(message: String)

The names of the functions largely give away what their purpose is but just for completeness:

  • changedConnectionState - use this if you want to use connection state changes to perform different actions / UI updates
  • subscribedToChannel - use this if you want to be informed of when a channel has successfully been subscribed to, which is useful if you want to perform actions that are only relevant after a subscription has succeeded, e.g. logging out the members of a presence channel
  • failedToSubscribeToChannel - use this if you want to be informed of a failed subscription attempt, which you could use, for exampple, to then attempt another subscription or make a call to a service you use to track errors
  • debugLog - use this if you want to log Pusher-related events, e.g. the underlying websocket receiving a message

Setting up a delegate looks like this:

Swift

class ViewController: UIViewController, PusherDelegate {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        let pusher = Pusher(key: "APP_KEY")
        pusher.connection.delegate = self
        // ...
    }
}

Objective-C

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.client = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];

    self.client.connection.delegate = self;
    // ...
}

Here are examples of setting up a class with functions for each of the optional protocol functions:

Swift

class DummyDelegate: PusherDelegate {
    func changedConnectionState(from old: ConnectionState, to new: ConnectionState) {
        // ...
    }

    func debugLog(message: String) {
        // ...
    }

    func subscribedToChannel(name: String) {
        // ...
    }

    func failedToSubscribeToChannel(name: String, response: URLResponse?, data: String?, error: NSError?) {
        // ...
    }
}

Objective-C

@interface DummyDelegate : NSObject <PusherDelegate>

- (void)changedConnectionState:(enum ConnectionState)old to:(enum ConnectionState)new_
- (void)debugLogWithMessage:(NSString *)message
- (void)subscribedToChannelWithName:(NSString *)name
- (void)failedToSubscribeToChannelWithName:(NSString *)name response:(NSURLResponse *)response data:(NSString *)data error:(NSError *)error

@end

@implementation DummyDelegate

- (void)changedConnectionState:(enum ConnectionState)old to:(enum ConnectionState)new_ {
    // ...
}

- (void)debugLogWithMessage:(NSString *)message {
    // ...
}

- (void)subscribedToChannelWithName:(NSString *)name {
    // ...
}

- (void)failedToSubscribeToChannelWithName:(NSString *)name response:(NSURLResponse *)response data:(NSString *)data error:(NSError *)error {
    // ...
}

@end

The different states that the connection can be in are (Objective-C integer enum cases in brackets):

  • connecting (0) - the connection is about to attempt to be made
  • connected (1) - the connection has been successfully made
  • disconnecting (2) - the connection has been instructed to disconnect and it is just about to do so
  • disconnected (3) - the connection has disconnected and no attempt will be made to reconnect automatically
  • reconnecting (4) - an attempt is going to be made to try and re-establish the connection
  • reconnectingWhenNetworkBecomesReachable (5) - when the network becomes reachable an attempt will be made to reconnect

There is a stringValue function that you can call on ConnectionState objects in order to get a String representation of the state, for example "connecting".

Reconnection

There are three main ways in which a disconnection can occur:

  • The client explicitly calls disconnect and a close frame is sent over the websocket connection
  • The client experiences some form of network degradation which leads to a heartbeat (ping/pong) message being missed and thus the client disconnects
  • The Pusher server closes the websocket connection; typically this will only occur during a restart of the Pusher socket servers and an almost immediate reconnection should occur

In the case of the first type of disconnection the library will (as you'd hope) not attempt a reconnection.

If there is network degradation that leads to a disconnection then the library has the Reachability library embedded and will be able to automatically determine when to attempt a reconnect based on the changing network conditions.

If the Pusher servers close the websocket then the library will attempt to reconnect (by default) a maximum of 6 times, with an exponential backoff. The value of reconnectAttemptsMax is a public property on the PusherConnection and so can be changed if you wish.

All of this is the case if you have the client option of autoReconnect set as true, which it is by default. If the reconnection strategies are not suitable for your use case then you can set autoReconnect to false and implement your own reconnection strategy based on the connection state changes.

There are a couple of properties on the connection (PusherConnection) that you can set that affect how the reconnection behaviour works. These are:

  • public var reconnectAttemptsMax: Int? = 6 - if you set this to nil then there is no maximum number of reconnect attempts and so attempts will continue to be made with an exponential backoff (based on number of attempts), otherwise only as many attempts as this property's value will be made before the connection's state moves to .disconnected
  • public var maxReconnectGapInSeconds: Double? = nil - if you want to set a maximum length of time (in seconds) between reconnect attempts then set this property appropriately

Note that the number of reconnect attempts gets reset to 0 as soon as a successful connection is made.

Subscribing

Public channels

The default method for subscribing to a channel involves invoking the subscribe method of your client object:

Swift

let myChannel = pusher.subscribe("my-channel")

Objective-C

PusherChannel *myChannel = [pusher subscribeWithChannelName:@"my-channel"];

This returns PusherChannel object, which events can be bound to.

Private channels

Private channels are created in exactly the same way as public channels, except that they reside in the 'private-' namespace. This means prefixing the channel name:

Swift

let myPrivateChannel = pusher.subscribe("private-my-channel")

Objective-C

PusherChannel *myPrivateChannel = [pusher subscribeWithChannelName:@"private-my-channel"];

Subscribing to private channels involves the client being authenticated. See the Configuration section for the authenticated channel example for more information.

Presence channels

Presence channels are channels whose names are prefixed by presence-.

The recommended way of subscribing to a presence channel is to use the subscribeToPresenceChannel function, as opposed to the standard subscribe function. Using the subscribeToPresenceChannel function means that you get a PusherPresenceChannel object returned, as opposed to a standard PusherChannel. This PusherPresenceChannel object has some extra, presence-channel-specific functions availalbe to it, such as members, me, and findMember.

Swift

let myPresenceChannel = pusher.subscribeToPresenceChannel(channelName: "presence-my-channel")

Objective-C

PusherPresenceChannel *myPresenceChannel = [pusher subscribeToPresenceChannelWithChannelName:@"presence-my-channel"];

As alluded to, you can still subscribe to presence channels using the subscribe method, but the channel object you get back won't have access to the presence-channel-specific functions, unless you choose to cast the channel object to a PusherPresenceChannel.

Swift

let myPresenceChannel = pusher.subscribe("presence-my-channel")

Objective-C

PusherChannel *myPresenceChannel = [pusher subscribeWithChannelName:@"presence-my-channel"];

You can also provide functions that will be called when members are either added to or removed from the channel. These are available as parameters to both subscribe and subscribeToPresenceChannel.

Swift

let onMemberChange = { (member: PusherPresenceChannelMember) in
    print(member)
}

let chan = pusher.subscribeToPresenceChannel("presence-channel", onMemberAdded: onMemberChange, onMemberRemoved: onMemberChange)

Objective-C

void (^onMemberChange)(PusherPresenceChannelMember*) = ^void (PusherPresenceChannelMember *member) {
    NSLog(@"%@", member);
};

PusherChannel *myPresenceChannel = [pusher subscribeWithChannelName:@"presence-my-channel" onMemberAdded:onMemberChange onMemberRemoved:onMemberChange];

Note: The members and myId properties of PusherPresenceChannel objects (and functions that get the value of these properties) will only be set once subscription to the channel has succeeded.

The easiest way to find out when a channel has been successfully susbcribed to is to bind to the event named pusher:subscription_succeeded on the channel you're interested in. It would look something like this:

Swift

let pusher = Pusher(key: "YOUR_APP_KEY")

let chan = pusher.subscribeToPresenceChannel("presence-channel")

chan.bind(eventName: "pusher:subscription_succeeded", callback: { data in
    print("Subscribed!")
    print("I can now access myId: \(chan.myId)")
    print("And here are the channel members: \(chan.members)")
})

Objective-C

Pusher *pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];
PusherPresenceChannel *chan = [pusher subscribeToPresenceChannelWithChannelName:@"presence-channel"];

[chan bindWithEventName:@"pusher:subscription_succeeded" callback: ^void (NSDictionary *data) {
    NSLog(@"Subscribed!");
    NSLog(@"I can now access myId: %@", chan.myId);
    NSLog(@"And here are my channel members: %@", chan.members);
}];

You can also be notified of a successfull subscription by using the subscriptionDidSucceed delegate method that is part of the PusherDelegate protocol.

Here is an example of using the delegate:

Swift

class DummyDelegate: PusherDelegate {
    func subscribedToChannel(name: String) {
        if channelName == "presence-channel" {
            if let presChan = pusher.connection.channels.findPresence(channelName) {
                // in here you can now have access to the channel's members and myId properties
                print(presChan.members)
                print(presChan.myId)
            }
        }
    }
}

let pusher = Pusher(key: "YOUR_APP_KEY")
pusher.connection.delegate = DummyDelegate()
let chan = pusher.subscribeToPresenceChannel("presence-channel")

Objective-C

@implementation DummyDelegate

- (void)subscribedToChannelWithName:(NSString *)name {
    if ([channelName isEqual: @"presence-channel"]) {
        PusherPresenceChannel *presChan = [self.client.connection.channels findPresenceWithName:@"presence-channel"];
        NSLog(@"%@", [presChan members]);
        NSLog(@"%@", [presChan myId]);
    }
}

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    // ...

    Pusher *pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];
    pusher.connection.delegate = [[DummyDelegate alloc] init];
    PusherChannel *chan = [pusher subscribeToPresenceChannelWithChannelName:@"presence-channel"];

Note that both private and presence channels require the user to be authenticated in order to subscribe to the channel. This authentication can either happen inside the library, if you configured your Pusher object with your app's secret, or an authentication request is made to an authentication endpoint that you provide, again when instantiaing your Pusher object.

We recommend that you use an authentication endpoint over including your app's secret in your app in the vast majority of use cases. If you are completely certain that there's no risk to you including your app's secret in your app, for example if your app is just for internal use at your company, then it can make things easier than setting up an authentication endpoint.

Binding to events

Events can be bound to at 2 levels; globally and per channel. When binding to an event you can choose to save the return value, which is a unique identifier for the event handler that gets created. The only reason to save this is if you're going to want to unbind from the event at a later point in time. There is an example of this below.

Global events

You can attach behaviour to these events regardless of the channel the event is broadcast to. The following is an example of an app that binds to new comments from any channel:

Swift

let pusher = Pusher(key: "YOUR_APP_KEY")
pusher.subscribe("my-channel")

pusher.bind(callback: { (data: Any?) -> Void in
    if let data = data as? [String : AnyObject] {
        if let commenter = data["commenter"] as? String, message = data["message"] as? String {
            print("\(commenter) wrote \(message)")
        }
    }
})

Objective-C

Pusher *pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];
PusherChannel *chan = [pusher subscribeWithChannelName:@"my-channel"];

[pusher bind: ^void (NSDictionary *data) {
    NSString *commenter = data[@"commenter"];
    NSString *message = data[@"message"];

    NSLog(@"%@ wrote %@", commenter, message);
}];

Per-channel events

These are bound to a specific channel, and mean that you can reuse event names in different parts of your client application. The following might be an example of a stock tracking app where several channels are opened for different companies:

Swift

let pusher = Pusher(key: "YOUR_APP_KEY")
let myChannel = pusher.subscribe("my-channel")

myChannel.bind(eventName: "new-price", callback: { (data: Any?) -> Void in
    if let data = data as? [String : AnyObject] {
        if let price = data["price"] as? String, company = data["company"] as? String {
            print("\(company) is now priced at \(price)")
        }
    }
})

Objective-C

Pusher *pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];
PusherChannel *chan = [pusher subscribeWithChannelName:@"my-channel"];

[chan bindWithEventName:@"new-price" callback:^void (NSDictionary *data) {
    NSString *price = data[@"price"];
    NSString *company = data[@"company"];

    NSLog(@"%@ is now priced at %@", company, price);
}];

Receiving errors

Errors are sent to the client for which they are relevant with an event name of pusher:error. These can be received and handled using code as follows. Obviously the specifics of how to handle them are left up to the developer but this displays the general pattern.

Swift

pusher.bind({ (message: Any?) in
    if let message = message as? [String: AnyObject], eventName = message["event"] as? String where eventName == "pusher:error" {
        if let data = message["data"] as? [String: AnyObject], errorMessage = data["message"] as? String {
            print("Error message: \(errorMessage)")
        }
    }
})

Objective-C

[pusher bind:^void (NSDictionary *data) {
    NSString *eventName = data[@"event"];

    if ([eventName isEqualToString:@"pusher:error"]) {
        NSString *errorMessage = data[@"data"][@"message"];
        NSLog(@"Error message: %@", errorMessage);
    }
}];

The sort of errors you might get are:

# if attempting to subscribe to an already subscribed-to channel

"{\"event\":\"pusher:error\",\"data\":{\"code\":null,\"message\":\"Existing subscription to channel presence-channel\"}}"

# if the auth signature generated by your auth mechanism is invalid

"{\"event\":\"pusher:error\",\"data\":{\"code\":null,\"message\":\"Invalid signature: Expected HMAC SHA256 hex digest of 200557.5043858:presence-channel:{\\\"user_id\\\":\\\"200557.5043858\\\"}, but got 8372e1649cf5a45a2de3cd97fe11d85de80b214243e3a9e9f5cee502fa03f880\"}}"

You can see that the general form they take is:

{
  "event": "pusher:error",
  "data": {
    "code": null,
    "message": "Error message here"
  }
}

Unbind event handlers

You can remove previously-bound handlers from an object by using the unbind function. For example,

Swift

let pusher = Pusher(key: "YOUR_APP_KEY")
let myChannel = pusher.subscribe("my-channel")

let eventHandlerId = myChannel.bind(eventName: "new-price", callback: { (data: Any?) -> Void in
  ...
})

myChannel.unbind(eventName: "new-price", callbackId: eventHandlerId)

Objective-C

Pusher *pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];
PusherChannel *chan = [pusher subscribeWithChannelName:@"my-channel"];

NSString *callbackId = [chan bindWithEventName:@"new-price" callback:^void (NSDictionary *data) {
    ...
}];

[chan unbindWithEventName:@"new-price" callbackId:callbackId];

You can unbind from events at both the global and per channel level. For both objects you also have the option of calling unbindAll, which, as you can guess, will unbind all eventHandlers on the object.

Push notifications

Pusher also supports push notifications. Instances of your application can register for push notifications and subscribe to "interests". Your server can then publish to those interests, which will be delivered to your application as push notifications. See our guide to setting up APNs push notifications for a friendly introduction.

Initializing the Pusher object

You should set up your app for push notifications in your AppDelegate. The setup varies slightly depending on whether you're using Swift or Objective-C, and whether you're using iOS or macOS (OS X):

Swift on iOS

import PusherSwift
import UserNotifications

@UIApplicationMain
class AppDelegate: UIResponder, UIApplicationDelegate {
    let pusher = Pusher(key: "YOUR_APP_KEY")
    ...

Objective-C on iOS

#import "AppDelegate.h"
@import UserNotifications;

@interface AppDelegate ()

@end

@implementation AppDelegate
...

Swift on macOS

import Cocoa
import PusherSwift

@NSApplicationMain
class AppDelegate: NSObject, NSApplicationDelegate, PusherDelegate {
    let pusher = Pusher(key: "YOUR_APP_KEY")
    // ...

Registering with APNs

For your app to receive push notifications, it must first register with APNs. You should do this when the application finishes launching. Your app should register for all types of notification, like so:

Swift on iOS

func application(_ application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: [UIApplicationLaunchOptionsKey : Any]? = nil) -> Bool {
    let center = UNUserNotificationCenter.current()
    center.requestAuthorization(options: [.alert, .sound, .badge]) { (granted, error) in
        // Enable or disable features based on authorization.
    }
    application.registerForRemoteNotifications()

    return true
}

Objective-C on iOS

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions {
    self.pusher = [[Pusher alloc] initWithKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];

    UNUserNotificationCenter *center = [UNUserNotificationCenter currentNotificationCenter];
    [center requestAuthorizationWithOptions:(UNAuthorizationOptionBadge | UNAuthorizationOptionAlert | UNAuthorizationOptionSound) completionHandler:^(BOOL granted, NSError * _Nullable error) {
        // Enable or disable features based on authorization.
    }];

    [application registerForRemoteNotifications];
    return YES;
}

Swift on macOS

func applicationDidFinishLaunching(_ aNotification: Notification) {
    NSApp.registerForRemoteNotifications(matching: [NSRemoteNotificationType.alert, NSRemoteNotificationType.sound, NSRemoteNotificationType.badge])
}

Receiving your APNs device token and registering with Pusher

Next, APNs will respond with a device token identifying your app instance. Your app should then register with Pusher, passing along its device token.

Your app can now subscribe to interests. The following registers and subscribes the app to the interest "donuts":

Swift on iOS

func application(_ application: UIApplication, didRegisterForRemoteNotificationsWithDeviceToken deviceToken: Data) {
    pusher.nativePusher.register(deviceToken: deviceToken)
    pusher.nativePusher.subscribe(interestName: "donuts")
}

Objective-C on iOS

- (void)application:(UIApplication *)application didRegisterForRemoteNotificationsWithDeviceToken:(NSData *)deviceToken {
    NSLog(@"Registered for remote notifications; received device token");
    [[[self pusher] nativePusher] registerWithDeviceToken:deviceToken];
    [[[self pusher] nativePusher] subscribeWithInterestName:@"donuts"];
}

Swift on macOS

func application(_ application: NSApplication, didRegisterForRemoteNotificationsWithDeviceToken deviceToken: Data) {
    self.pusher.nativePusher.register(deviceToken: deviceToken)
    self.pusher.nativePusher.subscribe(interestName: "donuts")
}

Receiving push notifications

When your server publishes a notification to the interest "donuts", it will get passed to your app. This happens as a call in your AppDelegate which you should listen to:

Swift on iOS

func application(_ application: UIApplication, didReceiveRemoteNotification userInfo: [AnyHashable : Any], fetchCompletionHandler completionHandler: @escaping (UIBackgroundFetchResult) -> Void) {
    print(userInfo)
}

Objective-C on iOS

- (void)application:(UIApplication *)application didReceiveRemoteNotification:(NSDictionary *)userInfo {
    NSLog(@"Received remote notification: %@", userInfo);
}

Swift on macOS

func application(_ application: NSApplication, didReceiveRemoteNotification userInfo: [String: Any]) {
    print("Received remote notification: \(userInfo.debugDescription)" )
}

Unsubscribing from interests

If at a later point you wish to unsubscribe from an interest, this works in the same way:

Swift

pusher.nativePusher.unsubscribe(interestName: "donuts")

Objective-C

[[[self pusher] nativePusher] unsubscribeWithInterestName:@"donuts"];

For a complete example of a working app, see the Example/ directory in this repository. Specifically for push notifications code, see the Example/AppDelegate.swift file.

Pusher delegate

You can also implement some of the PusherDelegate functions to get access to events that occur in relation to push notifications interactions. These are the functions that you can optionally implement when conforming to the PusherDelegate protocol:

@objc optional func registeredForPushNotifications(clientId: String)
@objc optional func subscribedToInterest(name: String)
@objc optional func unsubscribedFromInterest(name: String)

Again, the names of the functions largely give away what their purpose is but just for completeness:

  • registeredForPushNotifications - use this if you want to know when a client has successfully registered with the Pusher Push Notifications service, or if you want access to the clientId that is returned upon successful registration
  • subscribedToInterest - use this if you want keep track of interests that are successfully subscribed to
  • unsubscribedFromInterest - use this if you want keep track of interests that are successfully unsubscribed from

Setting up a delegate looks like this:

Swift

class ViewController: UIViewController, PusherDelegate {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        let pusher = Pusher(key: "APP_KEY")
        pusher.delegate = self
        // ...
    }
}

Objective-C

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.client = [[Pusher alloc] initWithAppKey:@"YOUR_APP_KEY"];

    self.client.delegate = self;
    // ...
}

The process is identical to that of setting up the PusherDelegate to receive notifications of connection-based events.

Testing

There are a set of tests for the library that can be run using the standard method (Command-U in Xcode).

The tests also get run on Travis-CI. See .travis.yml for details on how the Travis tests are run.

Extensions

Communication

  • If you have found a bug, please open an issue.
  • If you have a feature request, please open an issue.
  • If you want to contribute, please submit a pull request (preferrably with some tests 🙂 ).

Credits

PusherSwift is owned and maintained by Pusher. It was originally created by Hamilton Chapman.

It uses code from the following repositories:

The individual licenses for these libraries are included in the corresponding Swift files.

License

PusherSwift is released under the MIT license. See LICENSE for details.