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Working with CSV format

Please note that csv reader load data in a lazy manner. It ignores excessive trailing cells that has None value. For example, the following csv content:

1,2,,,,,
3,4,,,,,
5,,,,,,,

would end up as:

1,2
3,4
5,

Write to a csv file

.. testcode::
   :hide:

    >>> import sys
    >>> if sys.version_info[0] < 3:
    ...     from StringIO import StringIO
    ... else:
    ...     from io import StringIO
    >>> from pyexcel_io._compact import OrderedDict

Here's the sample code to write an array to a csv file

>>> import datetime
>>> from pyexcel_io import save_data
>>> data = [
...     [1, 2.0, 3.0],
...     [
...         datetime.date(2016, 5, 4),
...         datetime.datetime(2016, 5, 4, 17, 39, 12),
...         datetime.datetime(2016, 5, 4, 17, 40, 12, 100)
...     ]
... ]
>>> save_data("your_file.csv", data)

Let's verify the file content:

>>> with open("your_file.csv", "r") as csvfile:
...     for line in csvfile.readlines():
...         print(line.strip())
1,2.0,3.0
2016-05-04,2016-05-04 17:39:12,2016-05-04 17:40:12.000100

Change line endings

By default, python csv module provides windows line ending 'rn'. In order to change it, you can do:

>>> save_data("your_file.csv", data, lineterminator='\n')

Read from a csv file

And we can read the written csv file back as the following code:

>>> from pyexcel_io import get_data
>>> import pprint
>>> data = get_data("your_file.csv")
>>> pprint.pprint(data['your_file.csv'])
[[1, 2.0, 3.0],
 [datetime.date(2016, 5, 4),
  datetime.datetime(2016, 5, 4, 17, 39, 12),
  datetime.datetime(2016, 5, 4, 17, 40, 12, 100)]]

As you can see, pyexcel-io not only reads the csv file back but also recognizes the data types: int, float, date and datetime. However, it does give your cpu some extra job. When you are handling a large csv file and the cpu budget is of your concern, you may switch off the type detection feature. For example, let's switch all off:

>>> data = get_data("your_file.csv", auto_detect_float=False, auto_detect_datetime=False)
    >>> import json
>>> json.dumps(data['your_file.csv'])
'[[1, "2.0", "3.0"], ["2016-05-04", "2016-05-04 17:39:12", "2016-05-04 17:40:12.000100"]]'

In addition to auto_detect_float and auto_detect_datetime, there is another flag named auto_detect_int, which becomes active only if auto_detect_float is True. Now, let's play a bit with auto_detect_int:

>>> data = get_data("your_file.csv", auto_detect_int=False)
>>> pprint.pprint(data['your_file.csv'])
[[1.0, 2.0, 3.0],
 [datetime.date(2016, 5, 4),
  datetime.datetime(2016, 5, 4, 17, 39, 12),
  datetime.datetime(2016, 5, 4, 17, 40, 12, 100)]]

As you see, all numeric data are identified as float type. If you looked a few paragraphs above, you would notice auto_detect_int affected [1, 2, ..] in the first row.

Write a csv to memory

Here's the sample code to write a dictionary as a csv into memory:

>>> from pyexcel_io import save_data
>>> data = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]]
>>> io = StringIO()
>>> save_data(io, data)
>>> # do something with the io
>>> # In reality, you might give it to your http response
>>> # object for downloading

Read from a csv from memory

Continue from previous example:

>>> # This is just an illustration
>>> # In reality, you might deal with csv file upload
>>> # where you will read from requests.FILES['YOUR_XL_FILE']
>>> import json
>>> data = get_data(io)
>>> print(json.dumps(data))
{"csv": [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]]}

Encoding parameter

In general, if you would like to save your csv file into a custom encoding, you can specify 'encoding' parameter. Here is how you write verses of a finnish song, "Aurinko laskee länteen"[1] into a csv file

>>> content = [[u'Aurinko laskee länteen', u'Näin sen ja ymmärsin sen', u'Poissa aika on rakkauden Kun aurinko laskee länteen']]
>>> test_file = "test-utf16-encoding.csv"
    >>> save_data(test_file, content, encoding="utf-16", lineterminator="\n")

In the reverse direction, if you would like to read your csv file with custom encoding back, you do the same to get_data:

>>> custom_encoded_content = get_data(test_file, encoding="utf-16")
    >>> assert custom_encoded_content[test_file] == content
[1]A finnish song that was entered in Eurovision in 1965. You can check out its lyrics at diggiloo.net

Byte order mark (BOM) in csv file

By passing **encoding="utf-8-sig", You can write UTF-8 BOM header into your csv file. Here is an example to write a sentence of "Shui Dial Getou"[#f2] into a csv file:

>>> content = [[u'人有悲歡離合', u'月有陰晴圓缺']]
>>> test_file = "test-utf8-BOM.csv"
    >>> save_data(test_file, content, encoding="utf-8-sig", lineterminator="\n")

When you read it back you will have to specify encoding too.

>>> custom_encoded_content = get_data(test_file, encoding="utf-8-sig")
    >>> assert custom_encoded_content[test_file] == content
[2]One of Su shi's most famous poem. Here is the wiki link
.. testcode::
   :hide:

   >>> import os
   >>> os.unlink("your_file.csv")
   >>> os.unlink(test_file)