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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<lfm status="ok">
<tags page="3" perPage="10" totalPages="25" total="250">
<tag>
<name>80s</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/80s</url>
<reach>92908</reach>
<taggings>717351</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Fri, 1 Apr 2011 15:29:15 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1 January 1980 to 31 December 1989.
This tag consists of music first released in this time frame. The decade began with a backlash against disco music in the United States, and a movement away from the orchestral arrangements that had characterized much of the music of the 1970s. Music in the 1980s was characterized by unheard of electronic sounds accomplished through the use of synthesizers and keyboards, along with drum machines. This made a dramatic change in music. ]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1 January 1980 to 31 December 1989.
This tag consists of music first released in this time frame.
The decade began with a backlash against disco music in the United States, and a movement away from the orchestral arrangements that had characterized much of the music of the 1970s. Music in the 1980s was characterized by unheard of electronic sounds accomplished through the use of synthesizers and keyboards, along with drum machines. This made a dramatic change in music.
In the United States, MTV was launched and music videos began to have a huge effect on the record industry. U.S. pop artists such as Madonna and Michael Jackson mastered the format and turned it into big business.
'New wave' and 'synth-pop' were developed by many British and United States artists and became popular phenomena throughout the decade, especially in the early and mid eighties.
Hard rock, heavy metal, 'big hair' bands and glam metal, experienced extreme popularity in 1980s, becoming some of the most dominant music genres of the 1980s.
House and techno emerged both in Chicago and Detroit in early 80s and then become mainstream in 1990s.
--Live Aid concert in 1985 containing many artists promotes attention and action to send food aid to Ethiopia whose people were suffering from a major famine.
--The Hip hop scene evolved to become a powerful musical force.
]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>dance</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/dance</url>
<reach>118456</reach>
<taggings>744899</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
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<published>Tue, 4 Dec 2012 20:55:26 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Dance music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. It can be either a whole musical piece or part of a larger musical arrangement. In terms of performance, the major categories are live dance music and recorded dance music. Dance music works often bear the name of the corresponding dance, e.g. waltzes, the tango, the bolero, the can-can, minuets, salsa, various kinds of jigs and the breakdown. Often it is difficult to know whether the name of the music came first or the name of the dance. ]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Dance music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. It can be either a whole musical piece or part of a larger musical arrangement. In terms of performance, the major categories are live dance music and recorded dance music.
Dance music works often bear the name of the corresponding dance, e.g. waltzes, the tango, the bolero, the can-can, minuets, salsa, various kinds of jigs and the breakdown. Often it is difficult to know whether the name of the music came first or the name of the dance.
Nowadays, The term &quot;dance music&quot; is often used for more commercial forms of electronic music. It is also associated as any form of music is danced to, spanning genres of pop, hip-hop, house, techno, disco, electro and so on.]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>hardcore</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/hardcore</url>
<reach>88872</reach>
<taggings>639634</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Wed, 23 Jun 2010 10:44:16 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Hardcore can be used to describe a number of genres including: 1) The genre of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/hardcore%20punk" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">hardcore punk</a> as well as its various offshoots and derivatives. It can also be used as an adjective rather than a genre, often to describe a metalcore band that sounds heavier or more &quot;hardcore&quot; than other bands. 2) A genre of electronic music, with has some characteristics like being harder than the other electronic music genres and the songs having higher bpms, sometimes called <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/hardcore%20techno" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">hardcore techno</a> or <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/gabber" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">gabber</a>. ]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Hardcore can be used to describe a number of genres including:
1) The genre of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/hardcore%20punk" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">hardcore punk</a> as well as its various offshoots and derivatives. It can also be used as an adjective rather than a genre, often to describe a metalcore band that sounds heavier or more &quot;hardcore&quot; than other bands.
2) A genre of electronic music, with has some characteristics like being harder than the other electronic music genres and the songs having higher bpms, sometimes called <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/hardcore%20techno" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">hardcore techno</a> or <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/gabber" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">gabber</a>.
3) The genre of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/hardcore%20rap" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">hardcore rap</a> or <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/hardcore%20hip%20hop" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">hardcore hip hop</a>.]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>black metal</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/black%20metal</url>
<reach>54526</reach>
<taggings>750688</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Tue, 15 Jan 2013 05:00:46 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Black metal is an extreme sub-genre of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/heavy%20metal" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">heavy metal</a> featuring harsh screams or evil voices at the vocal styles, fast electric guitars with tremolo picking and blast beat drumming and raw recording and extreme guitar distortion and a harsh guitar sound with satanic or haunting lyrics. Often played by bands wearing all black, long usually black hair, black corpse paint make-up, spikes and studs, blood theatrics, pentagrams, upside-down crosses, black leather and white face paint.]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Black metal is an extreme sub-genre of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/heavy%20metal" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">heavy metal</a> featuring harsh screams or evil voices at the vocal styles, fast electric guitars with tremolo picking and blast beat drumming and raw recording and extreme guitar distortion and a harsh guitar sound with satanic or haunting lyrics. Often played by bands wearing all black, long usually black hair, black corpse paint make-up, spikes and studs, blood theatrics, pentagrams, upside-down crosses, black leather and white face paint. Some forms of black metal put an emphasis on the nuances of ambient or atmospheric aspects which include the suicidal or depressive subgenres of black metal, while others focus more on melody or technicality.
The roots of black metal come from Venom's cartoon satanized and drunken take on <span title="Unknown tag" class="bbcode_unknown">Motörhead</span>. The band's <a title="Venom - Black Metal" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Venom/Black+Metal" class="bbcode_album">Black Metal</a> album has obviously been cited as a seminal influence on the genre. Venom is generally seen as one of the earliest examples of this style of music, being a major force of the 'first wave' of black metal, along with other bands such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Bathory" class="bbcode_artist">Bathory</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Hellhammer" class="bbcode_artist">Hellhammer</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Celtic+Frost" class="bbcode_artist">Celtic Frost</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Mercyful+Fate" class="bbcode_artist">Mercyful Fate</a>.
The 'second wave' of black metal began with Norwegian and Greek bands in the late 1980s and early 1990s, with artists such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Burzum" class="bbcode_artist">Burzum</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Darkthrone" class="bbcode_artist">Darkthrone</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Mayhem" class="bbcode_artist">Mayhem</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Rotting+Christ" class="bbcode_artist">Rotting Christ</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Varathron" class="bbcode_artist">Varathron</a> playing a major role in the development of the genre. Black metal bands from the United States, such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Profanatica" class="bbcode_artist">Profanatica</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Von" class="bbcode_artist">Von</a>, also formed around this time. Most modern black metal has built upon the groundwork laid by bands during this time period. Furthermore, following a series of church burnings associated with black metal musicians and the murder of Euronymous of Mayhem by Burzum's Varg Vikernes, the Norwegian black metal scene received considerable attention from the mainstream media.
There is no well-defined 'third wave'&quot; of black metal, but many modern bands have explored territory outside of the traditional frameworks of the genre. Bands such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Blut+aus+Nord" class="bbcode_artist">Blut aus Nord</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Deathspell+Omega" class="bbcode_artist">Deathspell Omega</a> are particularly known for incorporating various unorthodox elements into their music. Other bands, such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Cradle+of+Filth" class="bbcode_artist">Cradle of Filth</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Dimmu+Borgir" class="bbcode_artist">Dimmu Borgir</a>, have become more popular by incorporating gothic sensibilities with a basic black metal framework, with both bands renowned for their use of prominent keyboards especially.
Iconoclastic ideology is typical of black metal bands. Aside from violent or anti-religious acts, an entire sub-genre of black metal bands are aligned with fascist ideology and National Socialism.
Although there are exceptions, modern black metal as a musical style tends to make use of high-pitched tremolo picking, shrieked or growled vocals, blast beats, unconventional song structures and an emphasis on atmosphere over technical playing styles. Black metal rarely features verse-chorus structures, generally favoring a more basic style that features extended musical sections and repetitive guitar riffs. Guitar solos are a rarity in black metal, although they are featured prominently in the music of some bands. Black metal often features very lo-fi, primitive recording quality reminiscent of the early days of the genre, but some bands have favored more professional recording techniques. While the harsh vocal style of black metal has become nearly universal, many bands still feature clean vocals, used either in conjunction with more extreme vocals or as the primary vocal style.
Some black metal bands have incorporated keyboards, <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/folk" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">folk</a> instruments or other musical influences into their music. <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Emperor" class="bbcode_artist">Emperor</a> was a key band in the development of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/symphonic%20black%20metal" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">symphonic black metal</a>, with many later bands adopting a similar, keyboard-heavy style. Bands such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Ulver" class="bbcode_artist">Ulver</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Nokturnal+Mortum" class="bbcode_artist">Nokturnal Mortum</a> incorporated influences from ethnic folk music. Other influences from music such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/industrial" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">industrial</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/dark%20ambient" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">dark ambient</a> are also common.
Although anti-religious themes are often favored in black metal, there are exceptions. Many bands have written about folklore, nature or a variety of other subjects. <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Summoning" class="bbcode_artist">Summoning</a> primarily explores lyrical themes inspired by J.R.R. Tolkien's writings. Some black metal bands also feature themes tied to National Socialism or other strong political beliefs.
Unlike most other artists from other forms of music, many black metal bands do not play live. Many bands, such as <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Burzum" class="bbcode_artist">Burzum</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Xasthur" class="bbcode_artist">Xasthur</a>, are one/two-men studio projects, but many bands with full line-ups also prefer to avoid playing live. However, many black metal bands are also known for their theatrical live shows, with the shows of bands such as Mayhem, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Immortal" class="bbcode_artist">Immortal</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Gorgoroth" class="bbcode_artist">Gorgoroth</a> being particularly notorious.
This tag may also refer to metal band's with black members in them.]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>chillout</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/chillout</url>
<reach>95758</reach>
<taggings>619862</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Wed, 26 Oct 2011 01:06:17 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Chill out (sometimes also chillout, chill-out, or simply chill), a term derived from a slang injunction to relax, emerged in the early and mid-1990s as a catch-all term for various styles of relatively mellow, slow-tempo music made by contemporary producers in the electronic music scene; there exists a misconception on last.fm that all music that isn't relatively hard on the ears can be termed chill or chillout. Therefore, this tag is highly abused and has lost much of its meaning.]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Chill out (sometimes also chillout, chill-out, or simply chill), a term derived from a slang injunction to relax, emerged in the early and mid-1990s as a catch-all term for various styles of relatively mellow, slow-tempo music made by contemporary producers in the electronic music scene; there exists a misconception on last.fm that all music that isn't relatively hard on the ears can be termed chill or chillout. Therefore, this tag is highly abused and has lost much of its meaning. The term &quot;Chill out music&quot;, as well as the genre itself, originated in chill rooms that were set up by DJs off to the edge of club dance floors to give patrons a chance to take a break from the hectic dance vibe and chill out with this style of music. Chill out as a musical genre or descriptive is synonymous with the more recently popularized terms &quot;smooth electronica&quot; and &quot;soft techno&quot; and is a loose genre of music blurring into several other very distinct styles of electronic and lo-fi music.
Notable artists
Although chill out is an emerging - however loose - genre of music, it is quite robust and features many prolific artists. Throughout the 1990s and the current decade, there have been many artists who have made a significant impact on what has come to be known as &quot;chill out music&quot; today. Among the most notable of those artists and projects are (in no order of precedence): Air, Fila Brazillia, Kruder &amp; Dorfmeister, dZihan &amp; Kamien, Thievery Corporation, DJ Unwind, Sven Van Hees, Lemongrass, Tosca, Ganga, Monte La Rue, Nightmares on Wax, The Dining Rooms, Bluetech, Sounds from the Ground, Jens Buchert, A Man Called Adam, Electric Skychurch, Mystical Sun, Single Cell Orchestra, Alex Cortiz, Zero 7, Sia, Boards of Canada, Stidiek. William Orbit, Groove Armada, Leftfield, Lenny Ibizarre, Timonkey, Banco de Gaia, Alan Steward and Lemon Jelly.]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>progressive rock</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/progressive%20rock</url>
<reach>88470</reach>
<taggings>621791</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Thu, 24 Mar 2011 23:18:58 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Progressive rock (often shortened to &quot;progressive&quot;, &quot;prog rock&quot; or &quot;prog&quot;, also sometimes called, although not synonymous with, &quot;art rock&quot;) is a form of rock music that evolved in the late-1960s and early 1970s as part of a &quot;mostly British attempt to elevate rock music to new levels of artistic credibility.&quot; Progressive rock bands pushed &quot;rock's technical and compositional boundaries&quot; by going beyond the standard rock or popular verse-chorus based song structures. Additionally, the arrangements often incorporate elements drawn from classical, jazz, and avant-garde music.]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Progressive rock (often shortened to &quot;progressive&quot;, &quot;prog rock&quot; or &quot;prog&quot;, also sometimes called, although not synonymous with, &quot;art rock&quot;) is a form of rock music that evolved in the late-1960s and early 1970s as part of a &quot;mostly British attempt to elevate rock music to new levels of artistic credibility.&quot;
Progressive rock bands pushed &quot;rock's technical and compositional boundaries&quot; by going beyond the standard rock or popular verse-chorus based song structures. Additionally, the arrangements often incorporate elements drawn from classical, jazz, and avant-garde music. Instrumental songs are more common, and songs with lyrics are sometimes conceptual, abstract, or based in fantasy. Progressive rock bands sometimes used &quot;concept albums that made unified statements, usually telling an epic story or tackling a grand overarching theme&quot;.
Progressive rock developed from late-1960s psychedelic rock and jazz fusion, as part of a wide-ranging tendency in rock music of this era to draw inspiration from ever more diverse influences. The term came into most widespread use around the mid-1970s. While progressive rock reached the peak of its popularity in the 1970s and early 1980s, neo-progressive bands have continued playing for faithful audiences in the subsequent decades. Progressive rock sharply declined in popularity for much of the 1980s, but returned to prominence in the early-to-mid 1990s.]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>death metal</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/death%20metal</url>
<reach>65761</reach>
<taggings>658662</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Fri, 27 Apr 2012 22:03:25 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Death metal is a subgenre of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/metal" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">metal</a>, most easily identifiable by its utilization of bass-heavy guitar distortion, harsh, often growled or grunted vocals, and particular brand of compositional density. Better known death metal bands include <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Morbid+Angel" class="bbcode_artist">Morbid Angel</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Autopsy" class="bbcode_artist">Autopsy</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Suffocation" class="bbcode_artist">Suffocation</a>, and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Entombed" class="bbcode_artist">Entombed</a>, all of which had in their earliest years contributed codifying releases to the subgenre. In the middle of the 1980s...]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Death metal is a subgenre of <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/metal" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">metal</a>, most easily identifiable by its utilization of bass-heavy guitar distortion, harsh, often growled or grunted vocals, and particular brand of compositional density. Better known death metal bands include <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Morbid+Angel" class="bbcode_artist">Morbid Angel</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Autopsy" class="bbcode_artist">Autopsy</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Suffocation" class="bbcode_artist">Suffocation</a>, and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Entombed" class="bbcode_artist">Entombed</a>, all of which had in their earliest years contributed codifying releases to the subgenre.
In the middle of the 1980s, the stylistic origins of death metal manifested; 1984 saw the release of a few EPs (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Slayer" class="bbcode_artist">Slayer</a> - <em><a title="Slayer - Haunting the Chapel" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Slayer/Haunting+the+Chapel" class="bbcode_album">Haunting the Chapel</a></em>; <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Celtic+Frost" class="bbcode_artist">Celtic Frost</a> - <em><a title="Celtic Frost - Morbid Tales" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Celtic+Frost/Morbid+Tales" class="bbcode_album">Morbid Tales</a></em>) and several demos (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Necrophagia" class="bbcode_artist">Necrophagia</a> - <em>Death Is Fun</em>; <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Possessed" class="bbcode_artist">Possessed</a> - <em>Death Metal</em>) from which the subgenre would initially draw its compositional and lyrical motifs. 1985 saw the first full-length death metal release in the well-known <em><a title="Possessed - Seven Churches" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Possessed/Seven+Churches" class="bbcode_album">Seven Churches</a></em>, the earliest identifiable distinction the subgenre made from other emergent forms of extreme metal.
By the end of the decade, death metal had developed regional specificities. Two particular regions of the United States yielded two particular sounds: California (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Sadus" class="bbcode_artist">Sadus</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Terrorizer" class="bbcode_artist">Terrorizer</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Autopsy" class="bbcode_artist">Autopsy</a>) and Florida (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Obituary" class="bbcode_artist">Obituary</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Morbid+Angel" class="bbcode_artist">Morbid Angel</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Death" class="bbcode_artist">Death</a>); meanwhile, Sweden had developed a <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/swedish%20death%20metal">unified sound of its own</a> (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Merciless" class="bbcode_artist">Merciless</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Grotesque" class="bbcode_artist">Grotesque</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Carnage" class="bbcode_artist">Carnage</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Nihilist" class="bbcode_artist">Nihilist</a>). Other regions of the world followed suit, to include Brazil (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Psychic+Possessor" class="bbcode_artist">Psychic Possessor</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Mutilator" class="bbcode_artist">Mutilator</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Sepultura" class="bbcode_artist">Sepultura</a>), Britain (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Cancer" class="bbcode_artist">Cancer</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Benediction" class="bbcode_artist">Benediction</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Bolt+Thrower" class="bbcode_artist">Bolt Thrower</a>), and Mainland Europe (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Necrodeath" class="bbcode_artist">Necrodeath</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Messiah" class="bbcode_artist">Messiah</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Sempiternal+Deathreign" class="bbcode_artist">Sempiternal Deathreign</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Pestilence" class="bbcode_artist">Pestilence</a>).
1990 saw a worldwide surge of activity in death metal. Further subgenres were founded by seminal releases in the following years, with <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/technical%20death%20metal" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">technical death metal</a> (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Gorguts" class="bbcode_artist">Gorguts</a> - <em><a title="Gorguts - Considered Dead" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Gorguts/Considered+Dead" class="bbcode_album">Considered Dead</a></em>; <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Suffocation" class="bbcode_artist">Suffocation</a> - <em><a title="Suffocation - Human Waste" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Suffocation/Human+Waste" class="bbcode_album">Human Waste</a></em>) appearing in 1991 and <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/melodic%20death%20metal" class="bbcode_tag" rel="tag">melodic death metal</a> (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Amorphis" class="bbcode_artist">Amorphis</a> - <a title="Amorphis - The Karelian Isthmus" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Amorphis/The+Karelian+Isthmus" class="bbcode_album">The Karelian Isthmus</a>, <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Eucharist" class="bbcode_artist">Eucharist</a> - <em><a title="Eucharist - A Velvet Creation" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Eucharist/A+Velvet+Creation" class="bbcode_album">A Velvet Creation</a></em>; <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Carcass" class="bbcode_artist">Carcass</a> - <em><a title="Carcass - Heartwork" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Carcass/Heartwork" class="bbcode_album">Heartwork</a></em>) properly taking root in 1993. These stylistic schisms were the much more visible faces of death metal from the middle of the 1990s through to the middle of the 2000s.
After over a decade of scarcity characterized by <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Bloodbath">throwback tribute efforts</a> and <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Throneum">understated</a> <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Funerus">misfires</a>, the emergence of a <a href="http://www.last.fm/tag/new%20wave%20of%20old%20school%20death%20metal">new, third wave of legitimate, genre-appropriate death metal</a> slowly became apparent. As early as 2006, the reception of <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Repugnant" class="bbcode_artist">Repugnant</a> - <em><a title="Repugnant - Epitome of Darkness" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Repugnant/Epitome+of+Darkness" class="bbcode_album">Epitome of Darkness</a></em> signaled a change in the common conception of the death metal aesthetic held by newer bands; by 2008, several like-minded record labels (Razorback, Nuclear War Now!, Hells Headbangers) and critically exceptional releases (<a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Acid+Witch" class="bbcode_artist">Acid Witch</a> - <em><a title="Acid Witch - Witchtanic Hellucinations" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Acid+Witch/Witchtanic+Hellucinations" class="bbcode_album">Witchtanic Hellucinations</a></em>; <a href="http://www.last.fm/music/Dead+Congregation" class="bbcode_artist">Dead Congregation</a> - <em><a title="Dead Congregation - Graves Of The Archangels" href="http://www.last.fm/music/Dead+Congregation/Graves+Of+The+Archangels" class="bbcode_album">Graves Of The Archangels</a></em>) had cemented the movement's permanence.]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>instrumental</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/instrumental</url>
<reach>108836</reach>
<taggings>736168</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Sun, 5 Apr 2009 02:06:02 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or recording without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. Specifically, this term is used when referring to popular music; some musical genres make little use of the human voice, such as jazz, electronic music, and large amounts of European classical music (although in electronic music the voice can be sampled just like anything else). In commercial music, some tracks or songs on a compact disc include instrumental tracks.]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or recording without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. Specifically, this term is used when referring to popular music; some musical genres make little use of the human voice, such as jazz, electronic music, and large amounts of European classical music (although in electronic music the voice can be sampled just like anything else). In commercial music, some tracks or songs on a compact disc include instrumental tracks. These tracks are often exact copies of the corresponding song, but do not have vocals.
Instrumental tracks that have reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 include
&quot;Theme from A Summer Place&quot; - Percy Faith (1960)
&quot;Telstar&quot; - Tornados (1962)
&quot;L'Amour Est Bleu (Love Is Blue)&quot; - Paul Mauriat (1968)
&quot;Grazing in the Grass&quot; - Hugh Masekela (1968)
&quot;Frankenstein&quot; - Edgar Winter Group (1973)
&quot;Love's Theme&quot; - Love Unlimited Orchestra (1974)
&quot;The Hustle&quot; - Van McCoy (1975)
&quot;Theme from 'S.W.A.T.'&quot; - Rhythm Heritage (1976)
&quot;Rise&quot; - Herb Alpert (1979)
&quot;Chariots of Fire&quot; - Vangelis (1982)
&quot;Miami Vice Theme&quot; - Jan Hammer (1985)
&quot;Sandstorm&quot; - Darude (2000)
Some artists who exemplify instrumental music are: Moby, Yann Tiersen, Apocalyptica, Explosions in the Sky, Mogwai, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Stidiek and 65daysofstatic.
]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>heavy metal</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/heavy%20metal</url>
<reach>83015</reach>
<taggings>619367</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Thu, 27 Jan 2011 07:51:21 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Heavy metal (often referred to simply as metal) is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom and the United States. With roots in blues-rock and psychedelic rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. Heavy metal lyrics and performance styles are generally associated with masculinity and machismo. ]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Heavy metal (often referred to simply as metal) is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom and the United States. With roots in blues-rock and psychedelic rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. Heavy metal lyrics and performance styles are generally associated with masculinity and machismo.
The first heavy metal bands such as Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple attracted large audiences, though they were often critically reviled, a status common throughout the history of the genre. In the mid-1970s Judas Priest helped spur the genre’s evolution by discarding much of its blues influence; Motörhead introduced a punk rock sensibility and an increasing emphasis on speed. Bands in the New Wave of British Heavy Metal such as Iron Maiden followed in a similar vein. Before the end of the decade, heavy metal had attracted a worldwide following of fans known as “metalheads” or “headbangers”.
In the 1980s, glam metal became a major commercial force with groups like Mötley Crüe. Underground scenes produced an array of more extreme, aggressive styles: thrash metal broke into the mainstream with bands such as Metallica, while other styles like death metal and black metal remain subcultural phenomena. Since the mid-1990s, popular styles such as nu metal, which often incorporates elements of grunge and hip hop; and metalcore, which blends extreme metal with hardcore punk, have further expanded the definition of the genre. ]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
<tag>
<name>british</name>
<url>http://www.last.fm/tag/british</url>
<reach>86725</reach>
<taggings>632949</taggings>
<streamable>1</streamable>
<wiki>
<published>Sun, 22 Jul 2012 15:35:21 +0000</published>
<summary><![CDATA[Bands and artists that are from Great Britain.]]></summary>
<content><![CDATA[Bands and artists that are from Great Britain.]]></content>
</wiki>
</tag>
</tags>
</lfm>
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