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require 'cgi'
require 'action_view/helpers/date_helper'
require 'action_view/helpers/tag_helper'
require 'action_view/helpers/form_tag_helper'
require 'action_view/helpers/active_model_helper'
require 'action_view/helpers/tags'
require 'action_view/model_naming'
require 'active_support/core_ext/class/attribute_accessors'
require 'active_support/core_ext/hash/slice'
require 'active_support/core_ext/string/output_safety'
require 'active_support/core_ext/array/extract_options'
require 'active_support/core_ext/string/inflections'
module ActionView
# = Action View Form Helpers
module Helpers
# Form helpers are designed to make working with resources much easier
# compared to using vanilla HTML.
#
# Typically, a form designed to create or update a resource reflects the
# identity of the resource in several ways: (i) the url that the form is
# sent to (the form element's +action+ attribute) should result in a request
# being routed to the appropriate controller action (with the appropriate <tt>:id</tt>
# parameter in the case of an existing resource), (ii) input fields should
# be named in such a way that in the controller their values appear in the
# appropriate places within the +params+ hash, and (iii) for an existing record,
# when the form is initially displayed, input fields corresponding to attributes
# of the resource should show the current values of those attributes.
#
# In Rails, this is usually achieved by creating the form using +form_for+ and
# a number of related helper methods. +form_for+ generates an appropriate <tt>form</tt>
# tag and yields a form builder object that knows the model the form is about.
# Input fields are created by calling methods defined on the form builder, which
# means they are able to generate the appropriate names and default values
# corresponding to the model attributes, as well as convenient IDs, etc.
# Conventions in the generated field names allow controllers to receive form data
# nicely structured in +params+ with no effort on your side.
#
# For example, to create a new person you typically set up a new instance of
# +Person+ in the <tt>PeopleController#new</tt> action, <tt>@person</tt>, and
# in the view template pass that object to +form_for+:
#
# <%= form_for @person do |f| %>
# <%= f.label :first_name %>:
# <%= f.text_field :first_name %><br />
#
# <%= f.label :last_name %>:
# <%= f.text_field :last_name %><br />
#
# <%= f.submit %>
# <% end %>
#
# The HTML generated for this would be (modulus formatting):
#
# <form action="/people" class="new_person" id="new_person" method="post">
# <div style="margin:0;padding:0;display:inline">
# <input name="authenticity_token" type="hidden" value="NrOp5bsjoLRuK8IW5+dQEYjKGUJDe7TQoZVvq95Wteg=" />
# </div>
# <label for="person_first_name">First name</label>:
# <input id="person_first_name" name="person[first_name]" type="text" /><br />
#
# <label for="person_last_name">Last name</label>:
# <input id="person_last_name" name="person[last_name]" type="text" /><br />
#
# <input name="commit" type="submit" value="Create Person" />
# </form>
#
# As you see, the HTML reflects knowledge about the resource in several spots,
# like the path the form should be submitted to, or the names of the input fields.
#
# In particular, thanks to the conventions followed in the generated field names, the
# controller gets a nested hash <tt>params[:person]</tt> with the person attributes
# set in the form. That hash is ready to be passed to <tt>Person.create</tt>:
#
# if @person = Person.create(params[:person])
# # success
# else
# # error handling
# end
#
# Interestingly, the exact same view code in the previous example can be used to edit
# a person. If <tt>@person</tt> is an existing record with name "John Smith" and ID 256,
# the code above as is would yield instead:
#
# <form action="/people/256" class="edit_person" id="edit_person_256" method="post">
# <div style="margin:0;padding:0;display:inline">
# <input name="_method" type="hidden" value="put" />
# <input name="authenticity_token" type="hidden" value="NrOp5bsjoLRuK8IW5+dQEYjKGUJDe7TQoZVvq95Wteg=" />
# </div>
# <label for="person_first_name">First name</label>:
# <input id="person_first_name" name="person[first_name]" type="text" value="John" /><br />
#
# <label for="person_last_name">Last name</label>:
# <input id="person_last_name" name="person[last_name]" type="text" value="Smith" /><br />
#
# <input name="commit" type="submit" value="Update Person" />
# </form>
#
# Note that the endpoint, default values, and submit button label are tailored for <tt>@person</tt>.
# That works that way because the involved helpers know whether the resource is a new record or not,
# and generate HTML accordingly.
#
# The controller would receive the form data again in <tt>params[:person]</tt>, ready to be
# passed to <tt>Person#update_attributes</tt>:
#
# if @person.update_attributes(params[:person])
# # success
# else
# # error handling
# end
#
# That's how you typically work with resources.
module FormHelper
extend ActiveSupport::Concern
include FormTagHelper
include UrlHelper
include ModelNaming
# Creates a form that allows the user to create or update the attributes
# of a specific model object.
#
# The method can be used in several slightly different ways, depending on
# how much you wish to rely on Rails to infer automatically from the model
# how the form should be constructed. For a generic model object, a form
# can be created by passing +form_for+ a string or symbol representing
# the object we are concerned with:
#
# <%= form_for :person do |f| %>
# First name: <%= f.text_field :first_name %><br />
# Last name : <%= f.text_field :last_name %><br />
# Biography : <%= f.text_area :biography %><br />
# Admin? : <%= f.check_box :admin %><br />
# <%= f.submit %>
# <% end %>
#
# The variable +f+ yielded to the block is a FormBuilder object that
# incorporates the knowledge about the model object represented by
# <tt>:person</tt> passed to +form_for+. Methods defined on the FormBuilder
# are used to generate fields bound to this model. Thus, for example,
#
# <%= f.text_field :first_name %>
#
# will get expanded to
#
# <%= text_field :person, :first_name %>
# which results in an html <tt><input></tt> tag whose +name+ attribute is
# <tt>person[first_name]</tt>. This means that when the form is submitted,
# the value entered by the user will be available in the controller as
# <tt>params[:person][:first_name]</tt>.
#
# For fields generated in this way using the FormBuilder,
# if <tt>:person</tt> also happens to be the name of an instance variable
# <tt>@person</tt>, the default value of the field shown when the form is
# initially displayed (e.g. in the situation where you are editing an
# existing record) will be the value of the corresponding attribute of
# <tt>@person</tt>.
#
# The rightmost argument to +form_for+ is an
# optional hash of options -
#
# * <tt>:url</tt> - The URL the form is to be submitted to. This may be
# represented in the same way as values passed to +url_for+ or +link_to+.
# So for example you may use a named route directly. When the model is
# represented by a string or symbol, as in the example above, if the
# <tt>:url</tt> option is not specified, by default the form will be
# sent back to the current url (We will describe below an alternative
# resource-oriented usage of +form_for+ in which the URL does not need
# to be specified explicitly).
# * <tt>:namespace</tt> - A namespace for your form to ensure uniqueness of
# id attributes on form elements. The namespace attribute will be prefixed
# with underscore on the generated HTML id.
# * <tt>:html</tt> - Optional HTML attributes for the form tag.
#
# Also note that +form_for+ doesn't create an exclusive scope. It's still
# possible to use both the stand-alone FormHelper methods and methods
# from FormTagHelper. For example:
#
# <%= form_for :person do |f| %>
# First name: <%= f.text_field :first_name %>
# Last name : <%= f.text_field :last_name %>
# Biography : <%= text_area :person, :biography %>
# Admin? : <%= check_box_tag "person[admin]", "1", @person.company.admin? %>
# <%= f.submit %>
# <% end %>
#
# This also works for the methods in FormOptionHelper and DateHelper that
# are designed to work with an object as base, like
# FormOptionHelper#collection_select and DateHelper#datetime_select.
#
# === #form_for with a model object
#
# In the examples above, the object to be created or edited was
# represented by a symbol passed to +form_for+, and we noted that
# a string can also be used equivalently. It is also possible, however,
# to pass a model object itself to +form_for+. For example, if <tt>@post</tt>
# is an existing record you wish to edit, you can create the form using
#
# <%= form_for @post do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# This behaves in almost the same way as outlined previously, with a
# couple of small exceptions. First, the prefix used to name the input
# elements within the form (hence the key that denotes them in the +params+
# hash) is actually derived from the object's _class_, e.g. <tt>params[:post]</tt>
# if the object's class is +Post+. However, this can be overwritten using
# the <tt>:as</tt> option, e.g. -
#
# <%= form_for(@person, :as => :client) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# would result in <tt>params[:client]</tt>.
#
# Secondly, the field values shown when the form is initially displayed
# are taken from the attributes of the object passed to +form_for+,
# regardless of whether the object is an instance
# variable. So, for example, if we had a _local_ variable +post+
# representing an existing record,
#
# <%= form_for post do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# would produce a form with fields whose initial state reflect the current
# values of the attributes of +post+.
#
# === Resource-oriented style
#
# In the examples just shown, although not indicated explicitly, we still
# need to use the <tt>:url</tt> option in order to specify where the
# form is going to be sent. However, further simplification is possible
# if the record passed to +form_for+ is a _resource_, i.e. it corresponds
# to a set of RESTful routes, e.g. defined using the +resources+ method
# in <tt>config/routes.rb</tt>. In this case Rails will simply infer the
# appropriate URL from the record itself. For example,
#
# <%= form_for @post do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# is then equivalent to something like:
#
# <%= form_for @post, :as => :post, :url => post_path(@post), :method => :put, :html => { :class => "edit_post", :id => "edit_post_45" } do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# And for a new record
#
# <%= form_for(Post.new) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# is equivalent to something like:
#
# <%= form_for @post, :as => :post, :url => posts_path, :html => { :class => "new_post", :id => "new_post" } do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# However you can still overwrite individual conventions, such as:
#
# <%= form_for(@post, :url => super_posts_path) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# You can also set the answer format, like this:
#
# <%= form_for(@post, :format => :json) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# For namespaced routes, like +admin_post_url+:
#
# <%= form_for([:admin, @post]) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# If your resource has associations defined, for example, you want to add comments
# to the document given that the routes are set correctly:
#
# <%= form_for([@document, @comment]) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# Where <tt>@document = Document.find(params[:id])</tt> and
# <tt>@comment = Comment.new</tt>.
#
# === Setting the method
#
# You can force the form to use the full array of HTTP verbs by setting
#
# :method => (:get|:post|:patch|:put|:delete)
#
# in the options hash. If the verb is not GET or POST, which are natively
# supported by HTML forms, the form will be set to POST and a hidden input
# called _method will carry the intended verb for the server to interpret.
#
# === Unobtrusive JavaScript
#
# Specifying:
#
# :remote => true
#
# in the options hash creates a form that will allow the unobtrusive JavaScript drivers to modify its
# behavior. The expected default behavior is an XMLHttpRequest in the background instead of the regular
# POST arrangement, but ultimately the behavior is the choice of the JavaScript driver implementor.
# Even though it's using JavaScript to serialize the form elements, the form submission will work just like
# a regular submission as viewed by the receiving side (all elements available in <tt>params</tt>).
#
# Example:
#
# <%= form_for(@post, :remote => true) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# The HTML generated for this would be:
#
# <form action='http://www.example.com' method='post' data-remote='true'>
# <div style='margin:0;padding:0;display:inline'>
# <input name='_method' type='hidden' value='put' />
# </div>
# ...
# </form>
#
# === Setting HTML options
#
# You can set data attributes directly by passing in a data hash, but all other HTML options must be wrapped in
# the HTML key. Example:
#
# <%= form_for(@post, data: { behavior: "autosave" }, html: { name: "go" }) do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# The HTML generated for this would be:
#
# <form action='http://www.example.com' method='post' data-behavior='autosave' name='go'>
# <div style='margin:0;padding:0;display:inline'>
# <input name='_method' type='hidden' value='put' />
# </div>
# ...
# </form>
#
# === Removing hidden model id's
#
# The form_for method automatically includes the model id as a hidden field in the form.
# This is used to maintain the correlation between the form data and its associated model.
# Some ORM systems do not use IDs on nested models so in this case you want to be able
# to disable the hidden id.
#
# In the following example the Post model has many Comments stored within it in a NoSQL database,
# thus there is no primary key for comments.
#
# Example:
#
# <%= form_for(@post) do |f| %>
# <%= f.fields_for(:comments, :include_id => false) do |cf| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
# <% end %>
#
# === Customized form builders
#
# You can also build forms using a customized FormBuilder class. Subclass
# FormBuilder and override or define some more helpers, then use your
# custom builder. For example, let's say you made a helper to
# automatically add labels to form inputs.
#
# <%= form_for @person, :url => { :action => "create" }, :builder => LabellingFormBuilder do |f| %>
# <%= f.text_field :first_name %>
# <%= f.text_field :last_name %>
# <%= f.text_area :biography %>
# <%= f.check_box :admin %>
# <%= f.submit %>
# <% end %>
#
# In this case, if you use this:
#
# <%= render f %>
#
# The rendered template is <tt>people/_labelling_form</tt> and the local
# variable referencing the form builder is called
# <tt>labelling_form</tt>.
#
# The custom FormBuilder class is automatically merged with the options
# of a nested fields_for call, unless it's explicitly set.
#
# In many cases you will want to wrap the above in another helper, so you
# could do something like the following:
#
# def labelled_form_for(record_or_name_or_array, *args, &proc)
# options = args.extract_options!
# form_for(record_or_name_or_array, *(args << options.merge(:builder => LabellingFormBuilder)), &proc)
# end
#
# If you don't need to attach a form to a model instance, then check out
# FormTagHelper#form_tag.
#
# === Form to external resources
#
# When you build forms to external resources sometimes you need to set an authenticity token or just render a form
# without it, for example when you submit data to a payment gateway number and types of fields could be limited.
#
# To set an authenticity token you need to pass an <tt>:authenticity_token</tt> parameter
#
# <%= form_for @invoice, :url => external_url, :authenticity_token => 'external_token' do |f|
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# If you don't want to an authenticity token field be rendered at all just pass <tt>false</tt>:
#
# <%= form_for @invoice, :url => external_url, :authenticity_token => false do |f|
# ...
# <% end %>
def form_for(record, options = {}, &proc)
raise ArgumentError, "Missing block" unless block_given?
options[:html] ||= {}
case record
when String, Symbol
object_name = record
object = nil
else
object = record.is_a?(Array) ? record.last : record
raise ArgumentError, "First argument in form cannot contain nil or be empty" unless object
object_name = options[:as] || model_name_from_record_or_class(object).param_key
apply_form_for_options!(record, object, options)
end
options[:html][:data] = options.delete(:data) if options.has_key?(:data)
options[:html][:remote] = options.delete(:remote) if options.has_key?(:remote)
options[:html][:method] = options.delete(:method) if options.has_key?(:method)
options[:html][:authenticity_token] = options.delete(:authenticity_token)
builder = options[:parent_builder] = instantiate_builder(object_name, object, options)
fields_for = fields_for(object_name, object, options, &proc)
default_options = builder.multipart? ? { :multipart => true } : {}
default_options.merge!(options.delete(:html))
form_tag(options.delete(:url) || {}, default_options) { fields_for }
end
def apply_form_for_options!(record, object, options) #:nodoc:
object = convert_to_model(object)
as = options[:as]
action, method = object.respond_to?(:persisted?) && object.persisted? ? [:edit, :patch] : [:new, :post]
options[:html].reverse_merge!(
:class => as ? "#{action}_#{as}" : dom_class(object, action),
:id => as ? "#{action}_#{as}" : [options[:namespace], dom_id(object, action)].compact.join("_").presence,
:method => method
)
options[:url] ||= polymorphic_path(record, :format => options.delete(:format))
end
private :apply_form_for_options!
# Creates a scope around a specific model object like form_for, but
# doesn't create the form tags themselves. This makes fields_for suitable
# for specifying additional model objects in the same form.
#
# === Generic Examples
#
# Although the usage and purpose of +field_for+ is similar to +form_for+'s,
# its method signature is slightly different. Like +form_for+, it yields
# a FormBuilder object associated with a particular model object to a block,
# and within the block allows methods to be called on the builder to
# generate fields associated with the model object. Fields may reflect
# a model object in two ways - how they are named (hence how submitted
# values appear within the +params+ hash in the controller) and what
# default values are shown when the form the fields appear in is first
# displayed. In order for both of these features to be specified independently,
# both an object name (represented by either a symbol or string) and the
# object itself can be passed to the method separately -
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# First name: <%= person_form.text_field :first_name %>
# Last name : <%= person_form.text_field :last_name %>
#
# <%= fields_for :permission, @person.permission do |permission_fields| %>
# Admin? : <%= permission_fields.check_box :admin %>
# <% end %>
#
# <%= f.submit %>
# <% end %>
#
# In this case, the checkbox field will be represented by an HTML +input+
# tag with the +name+ attribute <tt>permission[admin]</tt>, and the submitted
# value will appear in the controller as <tt>params[:permission][:admin]</tt>.
# If <tt>@person.permission</tt> is an existing record with an attribute
# +admin+, the initial state of the checkbox when first displayed will
# reflect the value of <tt>@person.permission.admin</tt>.
#
# Often this can be simplified by passing just the name of the model
# object to +fields_for+ -
#
# <%= fields_for :permission do |permission_fields| %>
# Admin?: <%= permission_fields.check_box :admin %>
# <% end %>
#
# ...in which case, if <tt>:permission</tt> also happens to be the name of an
# instance variable <tt>@permission</tt>, the initial state of the input
# field will reflect the value of that variable's attribute <tt>@permission.admin</tt>.
#
# Alternatively, you can pass just the model object itself (if the first
# argument isn't a string or symbol +fields_for+ will realize that the
# name has been omitted) -
#
# <%= fields_for @person.permission do |permission_fields| %>
# Admin?: <%= permission_fields.check_box :admin %>
# <% end %>
#
# and +fields_for+ will derive the required name of the field from the
# _class_ of the model object, e.g. if <tt>@person.permission</tt>, is
# of class +Permission+, the field will still be named <tt>permission[admin]</tt>.
#
# Note: This also works for the methods in FormOptionHelper and
# DateHelper that are designed to work with an object as base, like
# FormOptionHelper#collection_select and DateHelper#datetime_select.
#
# === Nested Attributes Examples
#
# When the object belonging to the current scope has a nested attribute
# writer for a certain attribute, fields_for will yield a new scope
# for that attribute. This allows you to create forms that set or change
# the attributes of a parent object and its associations in one go.
#
# Nested attribute writers are normal setter methods named after an
# association. The most common way of defining these writers is either
# with +accepts_nested_attributes_for+ in a model definition or by
# defining a method with the proper name. For example: the attribute
# writer for the association <tt>:address</tt> is called
# <tt>address_attributes=</tt>.
#
# Whether a one-to-one or one-to-many style form builder will be yielded
# depends on whether the normal reader method returns a _single_ object
# or an _array_ of objects.
#
# ==== One-to-one
#
# Consider a Person class which returns a _single_ Address from the
# <tt>address</tt> reader method and responds to the
# <tt>address_attributes=</tt> writer method:
#
# class Person
# def address
# @address
# end
#
# def address_attributes=(attributes)
# # Process the attributes hash
# end
# end
#
# This model can now be used with a nested fields_for, like so:
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# ...
# <%= person_form.fields_for :address do |address_fields| %>
# Street : <%= address_fields.text_field :street %>
# Zip code: <%= address_fields.text_field :zip_code %>
# <% end %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# When address is already an association on a Person you can use
# +accepts_nested_attributes_for+ to define the writer method for you:
#
# class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_one :address
# accepts_nested_attributes_for :address
# end
#
# If you want to destroy the associated model through the form, you have
# to enable it first using the <tt>:allow_destroy</tt> option for
# +accepts_nested_attributes_for+:
#
# class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_one :address
# accepts_nested_attributes_for :address, :allow_destroy => true
# end
#
# Now, when you use a form element with the <tt>_destroy</tt> parameter,
# with a value that evaluates to +true+, you will destroy the associated
# model (eg. 1, '1', true, or 'true'):
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# ...
# <%= person_form.fields_for :address do |address_fields| %>
# ...
# Delete: <%= address_fields.check_box :_destroy %>
# <% end %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# ==== One-to-many
#
# Consider a Person class which returns an _array_ of Project instances
# from the <tt>projects</tt> reader method and responds to the
# <tt>projects_attributes=</tt> writer method:
#
# class Person
# def projects
# [@project1, @project2]
# end
#
# def projects_attributes=(attributes)
# # Process the attributes hash
# end
# end
#
# Note that the <tt>projects_attributes=</tt> writer method is in fact
# required for fields_for to correctly identify <tt>:projects</tt> as a
# collection, and the correct indices to be set in the form markup.
#
# When projects is already an association on Person you can use
# +accepts_nested_attributes_for+ to define the writer method for you:
#
# class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :projects
# accepts_nested_attributes_for :projects
# end
#
# This model can now be used with a nested fields_for. The block given to
# the nested fields_for call will be repeated for each instance in the
# collection:
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# ...
# <%= person_form.fields_for :projects do |project_fields| %>
# <% if project_fields.object.active? %>
# Name: <%= project_fields.text_field :name %>
# <% end %>
# <% end %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# It's also possible to specify the instance to be used:
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# ...
# <% @person.projects.each do |project| %>
# <% if project.active? %>
# <%= person_form.fields_for :projects, project do |project_fields| %>
# Name: <%= project_fields.text_field :name %>
# <% end %>
# <% end %>
# <% end %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# Or a collection to be used:
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# ...
# <%= person_form.fields_for :projects, @active_projects do |project_fields| %>
# Name: <%= project_fields.text_field :name %>
# <% end %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# When projects is already an association on Person you can use
# +accepts_nested_attributes_for+ to define the writer method for you:
#
# class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :projects
# accepts_nested_attributes_for :projects
# end
#
# If you want to destroy any of the associated models through the
# form, you have to enable it first using the <tt>:allow_destroy</tt>
# option for +accepts_nested_attributes_for+:
#
# class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :projects
# accepts_nested_attributes_for :projects, :allow_destroy => true
# end
#
# This will allow you to specify which models to destroy in the
# attributes hash by adding a form element for the <tt>_destroy</tt>
# parameter with a value that evaluates to +true+
# (eg. 1, '1', true, or 'true'):
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# ...
# <%= person_form.fields_for :projects do |project_fields| %>
# Delete: <%= project_fields.check_box :_destroy %>
# <% end %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# When a collection is used you might want to know the index of each
# object into the array. For this purpose, the <tt>index</tt> method
# is available in the FormBuilder object.
#
# <%= form_for @person do |person_form| %>
# ...
# <%= person_form.fields_for :projects do |project_fields| %>
# Project #<%= project_fields.index %>
# ...
# <% end %>
# ...
# <% end %>
def fields_for(record_name, record_object = nil, options = {}, &block)
builder = instantiate_builder(record_name, record_object, options)
output = capture(builder, &block)
output.concat builder.hidden_field(:id) if output && options[:hidden_field_id] && !builder.emitted_hidden_id?
output
end
# Returns a label tag tailored for labelling an input field for a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). The text of label will default to the attribute name unless a translation
# is found in the current I18n locale (through helpers.label.<modelname>.<attribute>) or you specify it explicitly.
# Additional options on the label tag can be passed as a hash with +options+. These options will be tagged
# onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example shown, except for the <tt>:value</tt> option, which is designed to
# target labels for radio_button tags (where the value is used in the ID of the input tag).
#
# ==== Examples
# label(:post, :title)
# # => <label for="post_title">Title</label>
#
# You can localize your labels based on model and attribute names.
# For example you can define the following in your locale (e.g. en.yml)
#
# helpers:
# label:
# post:
# body: "Write your entire text here"
#
# Which then will result in
#
# label(:post, :body)
# # => <label for="post_body">Write your entire text here</label>
#
# Localization can also be based purely on the translation of the attribute-name
# (if you are using ActiveRecord):
#
# activerecord:
# attributes:
# post:
# cost: "Total cost"
#
# label(:post, :cost)
# # => <label for="post_cost">Total cost</label>
#
# label(:post, :title, "A short title")
# # => <label for="post_title">A short title</label>
#
# label(:post, :title, "A short title", :class => "title_label")
# # => <label for="post_title" class="title_label">A short title</label>
#
# label(:post, :privacy, "Public Post", :value => "public")
# # => <label for="post_privacy_public">Public Post</label>
#
# label(:post, :terms) do
# 'Accept <a href="/terms">Terms</a>.'.html_safe
# end
def label(object_name, method, content_or_options = nil, options = nil, &block)
Tags::Label.new(object_name, method, self, content_or_options, options).render(&block)
end
# Returns an input tag of the "text" type tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
# hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown.
#
# ==== Examples
# text_field(:post, :title, :size => 20)
# # => <input type="text" id="post_title" name="post[title]" size="20" value="#{@post.title}" />
#
# text_field(:post, :title, :class => "create_input")
# # => <input type="text" id="post_title" name="post[title]" value="#{@post.title}" class="create_input" />
#
# text_field(:session, :user, :onchange => "if $('session[user]').value == 'admin' { alert('Your login can not be admin!'); }")
# # => <input type="text" id="session_user" name="session[user]" value="#{@session.user}" onchange = "if $('session[user]').value == 'admin' { alert('Your login can not be admin!'); }"/>
#
# text_field(:snippet, :code, :size => 20, :class => 'code_input')
# # => <input type="text" id="snippet_code" name="snippet[code]" size="20" value="#{@snippet.code}" class="code_input" />
#
def text_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::TextField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns an input tag of the "password" type tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
# hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown. For security reasons this field is blank by default; pass in a value via +options+ if this is not desired.
#
# ==== Examples
# password_field(:login, :pass, :size => 20)
# # => <input type="password" id="login_pass" name="login[pass]" size="20" />
#
# password_field(:account, :secret, :class => "form_input", :value => @account.secret)
# # => <input type="password" id="account_secret" name="account[secret]" value="#{@account.secret}" class="form_input" />
#
# password_field(:user, :password, :onchange => "if $('user[password]').length > 30 { alert('Your password needs to be shorter!'); }")
# # => <input type="password" id="user_password" name="user[password]" onchange = "if $('user[password]').length > 30 { alert('Your password needs to be shorter!'); }"/>
#
# password_field(:account, :pin, :size => 20, :class => 'form_input')
# # => <input type="password" id="account_pin" name="account[pin]" size="20" class="form_input" />
#
def password_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::PasswordField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a hidden input tag tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
# hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown.
#
# ==== Examples
# hidden_field(:signup, :pass_confirm)
# # => <input type="hidden" id="signup_pass_confirm" name="signup[pass_confirm]" value="#{@signup.pass_confirm}" />
#
# hidden_field(:post, :tag_list)
# # => <input type="hidden" id="post_tag_list" name="post[tag_list]" value="#{@post.tag_list}" />
#
# hidden_field(:user, :token)
# # => <input type="hidden" id="user_token" name="user[token]" value="#{@user.token}" />
def hidden_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::HiddenField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a file upload input tag tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
# hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown.
#
# Using this method inside a +form_for+ block will set the enclosing form's encoding to <tt>multipart/form-data</tt>.
#
# ==== Examples
# file_field(:user, :avatar)
# # => <input type="file" id="user_avatar" name="user[avatar]" />
#
# file_field(:post, :attached, :accept => 'text/html')
# # => <input accept="text/html" type="file" id="post_attached" name="post[attached]" />
#
# file_field(:attachment, :file, :class => 'file_input')
# # => <input type="file" id="attachment_file" name="attachment[file]" class="file_input" />
#
def file_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::FileField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a textarea opening and closing tag set tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+)
# on an object assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
# hash with +options+.
#
# ==== Examples
# text_area(:post, :body, :cols => 20, :rows => 40)
# # => <textarea cols="20" rows="40" id="post_body" name="post[body]">
# # #{@post.body}
# # </textarea>
#
# text_area(:comment, :text, :size => "20x30")
# # => <textarea cols="20" rows="30" id="comment_text" name="comment[text]">
# # #{@comment.text}
# # </textarea>
#
# text_area(:application, :notes, :cols => 40, :rows => 15, :class => 'app_input')
# # => <textarea cols="40" rows="15" id="application_notes" name="application[notes]" class="app_input">
# # #{@application.notes}
# # </textarea>
#
# text_area(:entry, :body, :size => "20x20", :disabled => 'disabled')
# # => <textarea cols="20" rows="20" id="entry_body" name="entry[body]" disabled="disabled">
# # #{@entry.body}
# # </textarea>
def text_area(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::TextArea.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a checkbox tag tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). This object must be an instance object (@object) and not a local object.
# It's intended that +method+ returns an integer and if that integer is above zero, then the checkbox is checked.
# Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a hash with +options+. The +checked_value+ defaults to 1
# while the default +unchecked_value+ is set to 0 which is convenient for boolean values.
#
# ==== Gotcha
#
# The HTML specification says unchecked check boxes are not successful, and
# thus web browsers do not send them. Unfortunately this introduces a gotcha:
# if an +Invoice+ model has a +paid+ flag, and in the form that edits a paid
# invoice the user unchecks its check box, no +paid+ parameter is sent. So,
# any mass-assignment idiom like
#
# @invoice.update_attributes(params[:invoice])
#
# wouldn't update the flag.
#
# To prevent this the helper generates an auxiliary hidden field before
# the very check box. The hidden field has the same name and its
# attributes mimic an unchecked check box.
#
# This way, the client either sends only the hidden field (representing
# the check box is unchecked), or both fields. Since the HTML specification
# says key/value pairs have to be sent in the same order they appear in the
# form, and parameters extraction gets the last occurrence of any repeated
# key in the query string, that works for ordinary forms.
#
# Unfortunately that workaround does not work when the check box goes
# within an array-like parameter, as in
#
# <%= fields_for "project[invoice_attributes][]", invoice, :index => nil do |form| %>
# <%= form.check_box :paid %>
# ...
# <% end %>
#
# because parameter name repetition is precisely what Rails seeks to distinguish
# the elements of the array. For each item with a checked check box you
# get an extra ghost item with only that attribute, assigned to "0".
#
# In that case it is preferable to either use +check_box_tag+ or to use
# hashes instead of arrays.
#
# # Let's say that @post.validated? is 1:
# check_box("post", "validated")
# # => <input name="post[validated]" type="hidden" value="0" />
# # <input checked="checked" type="checkbox" id="post_validated" name="post[validated]" value="1" />
#
# # Let's say that @puppy.gooddog is "no":
# check_box("puppy", "gooddog", {}, "yes", "no")
# # => <input name="puppy[gooddog]" type="hidden" value="no" />
# # <input type="checkbox" id="puppy_gooddog" name="puppy[gooddog]" value="yes" />
#
# check_box("eula", "accepted", { :class => 'eula_check' }, "yes", "no")
# # => <input name="eula[accepted]" type="hidden" value="no" />
# # <input type="checkbox" class="eula_check" id="eula_accepted" name="eula[accepted]" value="yes" />
#
def check_box(object_name, method, options = {}, checked_value = "1", unchecked_value = "0")
Tags::CheckBox.new(object_name, method, self, checked_value, unchecked_value, options).render
end
# Returns a radio button tag for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). If the current value of +method+ is +tag_value+ the
# radio button will be checked.
#
# To force the radio button to be checked pass <tt>:checked => true</tt> in the
# +options+ hash. You may pass HTML options there as well.
#
# # Let's say that @post.category returns "rails":
# radio_button("post", "category", "rails")
# radio_button("post", "category", "java")
# # => <input type="radio" id="post_category_rails" name="post[category]" value="rails" checked="checked" />
# # <input type="radio" id="post_category_java" name="post[category]" value="java" />
#
# radio_button("user", "receive_newsletter", "yes")
# radio_button("user", "receive_newsletter", "no")
# # => <input type="radio" id="user_receive_newsletter_yes" name="user[receive_newsletter]" value="yes" />
# # <input type="radio" id="user_receive_newsletter_no" name="user[receive_newsletter]" value="no" checked="checked" />
def radio_button(object_name, method, tag_value, options = {})
Tags::RadioButton.new(object_name, method, self, tag_value, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "color".
#
# color_field("car", "color")
# # => <input id="car_color" name="car[color]" type="color" value="#000000" />
#
def color_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::ColorField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns an input of type "search" for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object_name+). Inputs of type "search" may be styled differently by
# some browsers.
#
# search_field(:user, :name)
# # => <input id="user_name" name="user[name]" type="search" />
# search_field(:user, :name, :autosave => false)
# # => <input autosave="false" id="user_name" name="user[name]" type="search" />
# search_field(:user, :name, :results => 3)
# # => <input id="user_name" name="user[name]" results="3" type="search" />
# # Assume request.host returns "www.example.com"
# search_field(:user, :name, :autosave => true)
# # => <input autosave="com.example.www" id="user_name" name="user[name]" results="10" type="search" />
# search_field(:user, :name, :onsearch => true)
# # => <input id="user_name" incremental="true" name="user[name]" onsearch="true" type="search" />
# search_field(:user, :name, :autosave => false, :onsearch => true)
# # => <input autosave="false" id="user_name" incremental="true" name="user[name]" onsearch="true" type="search" />
# search_field(:user, :name, :autosave => true, :onsearch => true)
# # => <input autosave="com.example.www" id="user_name" incremental="true" name="user[name]" onsearch="true" results="10" type="search" />
def search_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::SearchField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "tel".
#
# telephone_field("user", "phone")
# # => <input id="user_phone" name="user[phone]" type="tel" />
#
def telephone_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::TelField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# aliases telephone_field
alias phone_field telephone_field
# Returns a text_field of type "date".
#
# date_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="date" />
#
# The default value is generated by trying to call "to_date"
# on the object's value, which makes it behave as expected for instances
# of DateTime and ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone. You can still override that
# by passing the "value" option explicitly, e.g.
#
# @user.born_on = Date.new(1984, 1, 27)
# date_field("user", "born_on", value: "1984-05-12")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="date" value="1984-05-12" />
#
def date_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::DateField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "time".
#
# The default value is generated by trying to call +strftime+ with "%T.%L"
# on the objects's value. It is still possible to override that
# by passing the "value" option.
#
# === Options
# * Accepts same options as time_field_tag
#
# === Example
# time_field("task", "started_at")
# # => <input id="task_started_at" name="task[started_at]" type="time" />
#
def time_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::TimeField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "datetime".
#
# datetime_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="datetime" />
#
# The default value is generated by trying to call +strftime+ with "%Y-%m-%dT%T.%L%z"
# on the object's value, which makes it behave as expected for instances
# of DateTime and ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone.
#
# @user.born_on = Date.new(1984, 1, 12)
# datetime_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="datetime" value="1984-01-12T00:00:00.000+0000" />
#
def datetime_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::DatetimeField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "datetime-local".
#
# datetime_local_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="datetime-local" />
#
# The default value is generated by trying to call +strftime+ with "%Y-%m-%dT%T"
# on the object's value, which makes it behave as expected for instances
# of DateTime and ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone.
#
# @user.born_on = Date.new(1984, 1, 12)
# datetime_local_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="datetime-local" value="1984-01-12T00:00:00" />
#
def datetime_local_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::DatetimeLocalField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "month".
#
# month_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="month" />
#
# The default value is generated by trying to call +strftime+ with "%Y-%m"
# on the object's value, which makes it behave as expected for instances
# of DateTime and ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone.
#
# @user.born_on = Date.new(1984, 1, 27)
# month_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="date" value="1984-01" />
#
def month_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::MonthField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "week".
#
# week_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="week" />
#
# The default value is generated by trying to call +strftime+ with "%Y-W%W"
# on the object's value, which makes it behave as expected for instances
# of DateTime and ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone.
#
# @user.born_on = Date.new(1984, 5, 12)
# week_field("user", "born_on")
# # => <input id="user_born_on" name="user[born_on]" type="date" value="1984-W19" />
#
def week_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::WeekField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "url".
#
# url_field("user", "homepage")
# # => <input id="user_homepage" name="user[homepage]" type="url" />
#
def url_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::UrlField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns a text_field of type "email".
#
# email_field("user", "address")
# # => <input id="user_address" name="user[address]" type="email" />
#
def email_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::EmailField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns an input tag of type "number".
#
# ==== Options
# * Accepts same options as number_field_tag
def number_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::NumberField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
# Returns an input tag of type "range".
#
# ==== Options
# * Accepts same options as range_field_tag
def range_field(object_name, method, options = {})
Tags::RangeField.new(object_name, method, self, options).render
end
private
def instantiate_builder(record_name, record_object, options)
case record_name
when String, Symbol
object = record_object
object_name = record_name
else
object = record_name
object_name = model_name_from_record_or_class(object).param_key
end
builder = options[:builder] || default_form_builder
builder.new(object_name, object, self, options)
end
def default_form_builder
builder = ActionView::Base.default_form_builder
builder.respond_to?(:constantize) ? builder.constantize : builder
end
end
class FormBuilder
include ModelNaming
# The methods which wrap a form helper call.
class_attribute :field_helpers
self.field_helpers = FormHelper.instance_methods - [:form_for, :convert_to_model, :model_name_from_record_or_class]
attr_accessor :object_name, :object, :options
attr_reader :multipart, :parent_builder, :index
alias :multipart? :multipart
def multipart=(multipart)
@multipart = multipart
parent_builder.multipart = multipart if parent_builder
end
def self._to_partial_path
@_to_partial_path ||= name.demodulize.underscore.sub!(/_builder$/, '')
end
def to_partial_path
self.class._to_partial_path
end
def to_model
self
end
def initialize(object_name, object, template, options, block=nil)
if block
ActiveSupport::Deprecation.warn(
"Giving a block to FormBuilder is deprecated and has no effect anymore.")
end
@nested_child_index = {}
@object_name, @object, @template, @options = object_name, object, template, options
@parent_builder = options[:parent_builder]
@default_options = @options ? @options.slice(:index, :namespace) : {}
if @object_name.to_s.match(/\[\]$/)
if object ||= @template.instance_variable_get("@#{Regexp.last_match.pre_match}") and object.respond_to?(:to_param)
@auto_index = object.to_param
else
raise ArgumentError, "object[] naming but object param and @object var don't exist or don't respond to to_param: #{object.inspect}"
end
end
@multipart = nil
@index = options[:index] || options[:child_index]
end
(field_helpers - [:label, :check_box, :radio_button, :fields_for, :hidden_field, :file_field]).each do |selector|
class_eval <<-RUBY_EVAL, __FILE__, __LINE__ + 1
def #{selector}(method, options = {}) # def text_field(method, options = {})
@template.send( # @template.send(
#{selector.inspect}, # "text_field",
@object_name, # @object_name,
method, # method,
objectify_options(options)) # objectify_options(options))
end # end
RUBY_EVAL
end
def fields_for(record_name, record_object = nil, fields_options = {}, &block)
fields_options, record_object = record_object, nil if record_object.is_a?(Hash) && record_object.extractable_options?
fields_options[:builder] ||= options[:builder]
fields_options[:parent_builder] = self
fields_options[:namespace] = options[:namespace]
case record_name
when String, Symbol
if nested_attributes_association?(record_name)
return fields_for_with_nested_attributes(record_name, record_object, fields_options, block)
end
else
record_object = record_name.is_a?(Array) ? record_name.last : record_name
record_name = model_name_from_record_or_class(record_object).param_key
end
index = if options.has_key?(:index)
options[:index]
elsif defined?(@auto_index)
self.object_name = @object_name.to_s.sub(/\[\]$/,"")
@auto_index
end
record_name = index ? "#{object_name}[#{index}][#{record_name}]" : "#{object_name}[#{record_name}]"
fields_options[:child_index] = index
@template.fields_for(record_name, record_object, fields_options, &block)
end
def label(method, text = nil, options = {}, &block)
@template.label(@object_name, method, text, objectify_options(options), &block)
end
def check_box(method, options = {}, checked_value = "1", unchecked_value = "0")
@template.check_box(@object_name, method, objectify_options(options), checked_value, unchecked_value)
end
def radio_button(method, tag_value, options = {})
@template.radio_button(@object_name, method, tag_value, objectify_options(options))
end
def hidden_field(method, options = {})
@emitted_hidden_id = true if method == :id
@template.hidden_field(@object_name, method, objectify_options(options))
end
def file_field(method, options = {})
self.multipart = true
@template.file_field(@object_name, method, objectify_options(options))
end
# Add the submit button for the given form. When no value is given, it checks
# if the object is a new resource or not to create the proper label:
#
# <%= form_for @post do |f| %>
# <%= f.submit %>
# <% end %>
#
# In the example above, if @post is a new record, it will use "Create Post" as
# submit button label, otherwise, it uses "Update Post".
#
# Those labels can be customized using I18n, under the helpers.submit key and accept
# the %{model} as translation interpolation:
#
# en:
# helpers:
# submit:
# create: "Create a %{model}"
# update: "Confirm changes to %{model}"
#
# It also searches for a key specific for the given object:
#
# en:
# helpers:
# submit:
# post:
# create: "Add %{model}"
#
def submit(value=nil, options={})
value, options = nil, value if value.is_a?(Hash)
value ||= submit_default_value
@template.submit_tag(value, options)
end
# Add the submit button for the given form. When no value is given, it checks
# if the object is a new resource or not to create the proper label:
#
# <%= form_for @post do |f| %>
# <%= f.button %>
# <% end %>
#
# In the example above, if @post is a new record, it will use "Create Post" as
# button label, otherwise, it uses "Update Post".
#
# Those labels can be customized using I18n, under the helpers.submit key
# (the same as submit helper) and accept the %{model} as translation interpolation:
#
# en:
# helpers:
# submit:
# create: "Create a %{model}"
# update: "Confirm changes to %{model}"
#
# It also searches for a key specific for the given object:
#
# en:
# helpers:
# submit:
# post:
# create: "Add %{model}"
#
# ==== Examples
# button("Create a post")
# # => <button name='button' type='submit'>Create post</button>
#
# button do
# content_tag(:strong, 'Ask me!')
# end
# # => <button name='button' type='submit'>
# # <strong>Ask me!</strong>
# # </button>
#
def button(value = nil, options = {}, &block)
value, options = nil, value if value.is_a?(Hash)
value ||= submit_default_value
@template.button_tag(value, options, &block)
end
def emitted_hidden_id?
@emitted_hidden_id ||= nil
end
private
def objectify_options(options)
@default_options.merge(options.merge(:object => @object))
end
def submit_default_value
object = convert_to_model(@object)
key = object ? (object.persisted? ? :update : :create) : :submit
model = if object.class.respond_to?(:model_name)
object.class.model_name.human
else
@object_name.to_s.humanize
end
defaults = []
defaults << :"helpers.submit.#{object_name}.#{key}"
defaults << :"helpers.submit.#{key}"
defaults << "#{key.to_s.humanize} #{model}"
I18n.t(defaults.shift, :model => model, :default => defaults)
end
def nested_attributes_association?(association_name)
@object.respond_to?("#{association_name}_attributes=")
end
def fields_for_with_nested_attributes(association_name, association, options, block)
name = "#{object_name}[#{association_name}_attributes]"
association = convert_to_model(association)
if association.respond_to?(:persisted?)
association = [association] if @object.send(association_name).is_a?(Array)
elsif !association.respond_to?(:to_ary)
association = @object.send(association_name)
end
if association.respond_to?(:to_ary)
explicit_child_index = options[:child_index]
output = ActiveSupport::SafeBuffer.new
association.each do |child|
options[:child_index] = nested_child_index(name) unless explicit_child_index
output << fields_for_nested_model("#{name}[#{options[:child_index]}]", child, options, block)
end
output
elsif association
fields_for_nested_model(name, association, options, block)
end
end
def fields_for_nested_model(name, object, options, block)
object = convert_to_model(object)
parent_include_id = self.options.fetch(:include_id, true)
include_id = options.fetch(:include_id, parent_include_id)
options[:hidden_field_id] = object.persisted? && include_id
@template.fields_for(name, object, options, &block)
end
def nested_child_index(name)
@nested_child_index[name] ||= -1
@nested_child_index[name] += 1
end
end
end
ActiveSupport.on_load(:action_view) do
cattr_accessor(:default_form_builder) { ::ActionView::Helpers::FormBuilder }
end
end
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