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# encoding: UTF-8
require 'active_support/core_ext/object/to_param'
require 'active_support/core_ext/regexp'
module ActionDispatch
# The routing module provides URL rewriting in native Ruby. It's a way to
# redirect incoming requests to controllers and actions. This replaces
# mod_rewrite rules. Best of all, Rails' \Routing works with any web server.
# Routes are defined in <tt>config/routes.rb</tt>.
#
# Think of creating routes as drawing a map for your requests. The map tells
# them where to go based on some predefined pattern:
#
# AppName::Application.routes.draw do
# Pattern 1 tells some request to go to one place
# Pattern 2 tell them to go to another
# ...
# end
#
# The following symbols are special:
#
# :controller maps to your controller name
# :action maps to an action with your controllers
#
# Other names simply map to a parameter as in the case of <tt>:id</tt>.
#
# == Resources
#
# Resource routing allows you to quickly declare all of the common routes
# for a given resourceful controller. Instead of declaring separate routes
# for your +index+, +show+, +new+, +edit+, +create+, +update+ and +destroy+
# actions, a resourceful route declares them in a single line of code:
#
# resources :photos
#
# Sometimes, you have a resource that clients always look up without
# referencing an ID. A common example, /profile always shows the profile of
# the currently logged in user. In this case, you can use a singular resource
# to map /profile (rather than /profile/:id) to the show action.
#
# resource :profile
#
# It's common to have resources that are logically children of other
# resources:
#
# resources :magazines do
# resources :ads
# end
#
# You may wish to organize groups of controllers under a namespace. Most
# commonly, you might group a number of administrative controllers under
# an +admin+ namespace. You would place these controllers under the
# <tt>app/controllers/admin</tt> directory, and you can group them together
# in your router:
#
# namespace "admin" do
# resources :posts, :comments
# end
#
# Alternately, you can add prefixes to your path without using a separate
# directory by using +scope+. +scope+ takes additional options which
# apply to all enclosed routes.
#
# scope path: "/cpanel", as: 'admin' do
# resources :posts, :comments
# end
#
# For more, see <tt>Routing::Mapper::Resources#resources</tt>,
# <tt>Routing::Mapper::Scoping#namespace</tt>, and
# <tt>Routing::Mapper::Scoping#scope</tt>.
#
# == Named routes
#
# Routes can be named by passing an <tt>:as</tt> option,
# allowing for easy reference within your source as +name_of_route_url+
# for the full URL and +name_of_route_path+ for the URI path.
#
# Example:
#
# # In routes.rb
# match '/login' => 'accounts#login', as: 'login'
#
# # With render, redirect_to, tests, etc.
# redirect_to login_url
#
# Arguments can be passed as well.
#
# redirect_to show_item_path(id: 25)
#
# Use <tt>root</tt> as a shorthand to name a route for the root path "/".
#
# # In routes.rb
# root to: 'blogs#index'
#
# # would recognize http://www.example.com/ as
# params = { controller: 'blogs', action: 'index' }
#
# # and provide these named routes
# root_url # => 'http://www.example.com/'
# root_path # => '/'
#
# Note: when using +controller+, the route is simply named after the
# method you call on the block parameter rather than map.
#
# # In routes.rb
# controller :blog do
# match 'blog/show' => :list
# match 'blog/delete' => :delete
# match 'blog/edit/:id' => :edit
# end
#
# # provides named routes for show, delete, and edit
# link_to @article.title, show_path(id: @article.id)
#
# == Pretty URLs
#
# Routes can generate pretty URLs. For example:
#
# match '/articles/:year/:month/:day' => 'articles#find_by_id', constraints: {
# year: /\d{4}/,
# month: /\d{1,2}/,
# day: /\d{1,2}/
# }
#
# Using the route above, the URL "http://localhost:3000/articles/2005/11/06"
# maps to
#
# params = {year: '2005', month: '11', day: '06'}
#
# == Regular Expressions and parameters
# You can specify a regular expression to define a format for a parameter.
#
# controller 'geocode' do
# match 'geocode/:postalcode' => :show, constraints: {
# postalcode: /\d{5}(-\d{4})?/
# }
#
# Constraints can include the 'ignorecase' and 'extended syntax' regular
# expression modifiers:
#
# controller 'geocode' do
# match 'geocode/:postalcode' => :show, constraints: {
# postalcode: /hx\d\d\s\d[a-z]{2}/i
# }
# end
#
# controller 'geocode' do
# match 'geocode/:postalcode' => :show, constraints: {
# postalcode: /# Postcode format
# \d{5} #Prefix
# (-\d{4})? #Suffix
# /x
# }
# end
#
# Using the multiline match modifier will raise an +ArgumentError+.
# Encoding regular expression modifiers are silently ignored. The
# match will always use the default encoding or ASCII.
#
# == Default route
#
# Consider the following route, which you will find commented out at the
# bottom of your generated <tt>config/routes.rb</tt>:
#
# match ':controller(/:action(/:id))(.:format)'
#
# This route states that it expects requests to consist of a
# <tt>:controller</tt> followed optionally by an <tt>:action</tt> that in
# turn is followed optionally by an <tt>:id</tt>, which in turn is followed
# optionally by a <tt>:format</tt>.
#
# Suppose you get an incoming request for <tt>/blog/edit/22</tt>, you'll end
# up with:
#
# params = { controller: 'blog',
# action: 'edit',
# id: '22'
# }
#
# By not relying on default routes, you improve the security of your
# application since not all controller actions, which includes actions you
# might add at a later time, are exposed by default.
#
# == HTTP Methods
#
# Using the <tt>:via</tt> option when specifying a route allows you to
# restrict it to a specific HTTP method. Possible values are <tt>:post</tt>,
# <tt>:get</tt>, <tt>:patch</tt>, <tt>:put</tt>, <tt>:delete</tt> and
# <tt>:any</tt>. If your route needs to respond to more than one method you
# can use an array, e.g. <tt>[ :get, :post ]</tt>. The default value is
# <tt>:any</tt> which means that the route will respond to any of the HTTP
# methods.
#
# Examples:
#
# match 'post/:id' => 'posts#show', via: :get
# match 'post/:id' => 'posts#create_comment', via: :post
#
# Now, if you POST to <tt>/posts/:id</tt>, it will route to the <tt>create_comment</tt> action. A GET on the same
# URL will route to the <tt>show</tt> action.
#
# === HTTP helper methods
#
# An alternative method of specifying which HTTP method a route should respond to is to use the helper
# methods <tt>get</tt>, <tt>post</tt>, <tt>patch</tt>, <tt>put</tt> and <tt>delete</tt>.
#
# Examples:
#
# get 'post/:id' => 'posts#show'
# post 'post/:id' => 'posts#create_comment'
#
# This syntax is less verbose and the intention is more apparent to someone else reading your code,
# however if your route needs to respond to more than one HTTP method (or all methods) then using the
# <tt>:via</tt> option on <tt>match</tt> is preferable.
#
# == External redirects
#
# You can redirect any path to another path using the redirect helper in your router:
#
# match "/stories" => redirect("/posts")
#
# == Unicode character routes
#
# You can specify unicode character routes in your router:
#
# match "こんにちは" => "welcome#index"
#
# == Routing to Rack Applications
#
# Instead of a String, like <tt>posts#index</tt>, which corresponds to the
# index action in the PostsController, you can specify any Rack application
# as the endpoint for a matcher:
#
# match "/application.js" => Sprockets
#
# == Reloading routes
#
# You can reload routes if you feel you must:
#
# Rails.application.reload_routes!
#
# This will clear all named routes and reload routes.rb if the file has been modified from
# last load. To absolutely force reloading, use <tt>reload!</tt>.
#
# == Testing Routes
#
# The two main methods for testing your routes:
#
# === +assert_routing+
#
# def test_movie_route_properly_splits
# opts = {controller: "plugin", action: "checkout", id: "2"}
# assert_routing "plugin/checkout/2", opts
# end
#
# +assert_routing+ lets you test whether or not the route properly resolves into options.
#
# === +assert_recognizes+
#
# def test_route_has_options
# opts = {controller: "plugin", action: "show", id: "12"}
# assert_recognizes opts, "/plugins/show/12"
# end
#
# Note the subtle difference between the two: +assert_routing+ tests that
# a URL fits options while +assert_recognizes+ tests that a URL
# breaks into parameters properly.
#
# In tests you can simply pass the URL or named route to +get+ or +post+.
#
# def send_to_jail
# get '/jail'
# assert_response :success
# assert_template "jail/front"
# end
#
# def goes_to_login
# get login_url
# #...
# end
#
# == View a list of all your routes
#
# rake routes
#
# Target specific controllers by prefixing the command with <tt>CONTROLLER=x</tt>.
#
module Routing
autoload :Mapper, 'action_dispatch/routing/mapper'
autoload :RouteSet, 'action_dispatch/routing/route_set'
autoload :RoutesProxy, 'action_dispatch/routing/routes_proxy'
autoload :UrlFor, 'action_dispatch/routing/url_for'
autoload :PolymorphicRoutes, 'action_dispatch/routing/polymorphic_routes'
SEPARATORS = %w( / . ? ) #:nodoc:
HTTP_METHODS = [:get, :head, :post, :patch, :put, :delete, :options] #:nodoc:
end
end
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