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require 'erb'
require 'yaml'
require 'csv'
module YAML #:nodoc:
class Omap #:nodoc:
def keys; map { |k, v| k } end
def values; map { |k, v| v } end
end
end
class FixtureClassNotFound < ActiveRecord::ActiveRecordError #:nodoc:
end
# Fixtures are a way of organizing data that you want to test against; in short, sample data. They come in 3 flavours:
#
# 1. YAML fixtures
# 2. CSV fixtures
# 3. Single-file fixtures
#
# = YAML fixtures
#
# This type of fixture is in YAML format and the preferred default. YAML is a file format which describes data structures
# in a non-verbose, humanly-readable format. It ships with Ruby 1.8.1+.
#
# Unlike single-file fixtures, YAML fixtures are stored in a single file per model, which are placed in the directory appointed
# by <tt>Test::Unit::TestCase.fixture_path=(path)</tt> (this is automatically configured for Rails, so you can just
# put your files in <your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/). The fixture file ends with the .yml file extension (Rails example:
# "<your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/web_sites.yml"). The format of a YAML fixture file looks like this:
#
# rubyonrails:
# id: 1
# name: Ruby on Rails
# url: http://www.rubyonrails.org
#
# google:
# id: 2
# name: Google
# url: http://www.google.com
#
# This YAML fixture file includes two fixtures. Each YAML fixture (ie. record) is given a name and is followed by an
# indented list of key/value pairs in the "key: value" format. Records are separated by a blank line for your viewing
# pleasure.
#
# Note that YAML fixtures are unordered. If you want ordered fixtures, use the omap YAML type. See http://yaml.org/type/omap.html
# for the specification. You will need ordered fixtures when you have foreign key constraints on keys in the same table.
# This is commonly needed for tree structures. Example:
#
# --- !omap
# - parent:
# id: 1
# parent_id: NULL
# title: Parent
# - child:
# id: 2
# parent_id: 1
# title: Child
#
# = CSV fixtures
#
# Fixtures can also be kept in the Comma Separated Value format. Akin to YAML fixtures, CSV fixtures are stored
# in a single file, but instead end with the .csv file extension (Rails example: "<your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/web_sites.csv")
#
# The format of this type of fixture file is much more compact than the others, but also a little harder to read by us
# humans. The first line of the CSV file is a comma-separated list of field names. The rest of the file is then comprised
# of the actual data (1 per line). Here's an example:
#
# id, name, url
# 1, Ruby On Rails, http://www.rubyonrails.org
# 2, Google, http://www.google.com
#
# Should you have a piece of data with a comma character in it, you can place double quotes around that value. If you
# need to use a double quote character, you must escape it with another double quote.
#
# Another unique attribute of the CSV fixture is that it has *no* fixture name like the other two formats. Instead, the
# fixture names are automatically generated by deriving the class name of the fixture file and adding an incrementing
# number to the end. In our example, the 1st fixture would be called "web_site_1" and the 2nd one would be called
# "web_site_2".
#
# Most databases and spreadsheets support exporting to CSV format, so this is a great format for you to choose if you
# have existing data somewhere already.
#
# = Single-file fixtures
#
# This type of fixtures was the original format for Active Record that has since been deprecated in favor of the YAML and CSV formats.
# Fixtures for this format are created by placing text files in a sub-directory (with the name of the model) to the directory
# appointed by <tt>Test::Unit::TestCase.fixture_path=(path)</tt> (this is automatically configured for Rails, so you can just
# put your files in <your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/<your-model-name>/ -- like <your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/web_sites/ for the WebSite
# model).
#
# Each text file placed in this directory represents a "record". Usually these types of fixtures are named without
# extensions, but if you are on a Windows machine, you might consider adding .txt as the extension. Here's what the
# above example might look like:
#
# web_sites/google
# web_sites/yahoo.txt
# web_sites/ruby-on-rails
#
# The file format of a standard fixture is simple. Each line is a property (or column in db speak) and has the syntax
# of "name => value". Here's an example of the ruby-on-rails fixture above:
#
# id => 1
# name => Ruby on Rails
# url => http://www.rubyonrails.org
#
# = Using Fixtures
#
# Since fixtures are a testing construct, we use them in our unit and functional tests. There are two ways to use the
# fixtures, but first let's take a look at a sample unit test found:
#
# require 'web_site'
#
# class WebSiteTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
# def test_web_site_count
# assert_equal 2, WebSite.count
# end
# end
#
# As it stands, unless we pre-load the web_site table in our database with two records, this test will fail. Here's the
# easiest way to add fixtures to the database:
#
# ...
# class WebSiteTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
# fixtures :web_sites # add more by separating the symbols with commas
# ...
#
# By adding a "fixtures" method to the test case and passing it a list of symbols (only one is shown here tho), we trigger
# the testing environment to automatically load the appropriate fixtures into the database before each test.
# To ensure consistent data, the environment deletes the fixtures before running the load.
#
# In addition to being available in the database, the fixtures are also loaded into a hash stored in an instance variable
# of the test case. It is named after the symbol... so, in our example, there would be a hash available called
# @web_sites. This is where the "fixture name" comes into play.
#
# On top of that, each record is automatically "found" (using Model.find(id)) and placed in the instance variable of its name.
# So for the YAML fixtures, we'd get @rubyonrails and @google, which could be interrogated using regular Active Record semantics:
#
# # test if the object created from the fixture data has the same attributes as the data itself
# def test_find
# assert_equal @web_sites["rubyonrails"]["name"], @rubyonrails.name
# end
#
# As seen above, the data hash created from the YAML fixtures would have @web_sites["rubyonrails"]["url"] return
# "http://www.rubyonrails.org" and @web_sites["google"]["name"] would return "Google". The same fixtures, but loaded
# from a CSV fixture file, would be accessible via @web_sites["web_site_1"]["name"] == "Ruby on Rails" and have the individual
# fixtures available as instance variables @web_site_1 and @web_site_2.
#
# If you do not wish to use instantiated fixtures (usually for performance reasons) there are two options.
#
# - to completely disable instantiated fixtures:
# self.use_instantiated_fixtures = false
#
# - to keep the fixture instance (@web_sites) available, but do not automatically 'find' each instance:
# self.use_instantiated_fixtures = :no_instances
#
# Even if auto-instantiated fixtures are disabled, you can still access them
# by name via special dynamic methods. Each method has the same name as the
# model, and accepts the name of the fixture to instantiate:
#
# fixtures :web_sites
#
# def test_find
# assert_equal "Ruby on Rails", web_sites(:rubyonrails).name
# end
#
# = Dynamic fixtures with ERb
#
# Some times you don't care about the content of the fixtures as much as you care about the volume. In these cases, you can
# mix ERb in with your YAML or CSV fixtures to create a bunch of fixtures for load testing, like:
#
# <% for i in 1..1000 %>
# fix_<%= i %>:
# id: <%= i %>
# name: guy_<%= 1 %>
# <% end %>
#
# This will create 1000 very simple YAML fixtures.
#
# Using ERb, you can also inject dynamic values into your fixtures with inserts like <%= Date.today.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") %>.
# This is however a feature to be used with some caution. The point of fixtures are that they're stable units of predictable
# sample data. If you feel that you need to inject dynamic values, then perhaps you should reexamine whether your application
# is properly testable. Hence, dynamic values in fixtures are to be considered a code smell.
#
# = Transactional fixtures
#
# TestCases can use begin+rollback to isolate their changes to the database instead of having to delete+insert for every test case.
# They can also turn off auto-instantiation of fixture data since the feature is costly and often unused.
#
# class FooTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
# self.use_transactional_fixtures = true
# self.use_instantiated_fixtures = false
#
# fixtures :foos
#
# def test_godzilla
# assert !Foo.find(:all).empty?
# Foo.destroy_all
# assert Foo.find(:all).empty?
# end
#
# def test_godzilla_aftermath
# assert !Foo.find(:all).empty?
# end
# end
#
# If you preload your test database with all fixture data (probably in the Rakefile task) and use transactional fixtures,
# then you may omit all fixtures declarations in your test cases since all the data's already there and every case rolls back its changes.
#
# In order to use instantiated fixtures with preloaded data, set +self.pre_loaded_fixtures+ to true. This will provide
# access to fixture data for every table that has been loaded through fixtures (depending on the value of +use_instantiated_fixtures+)
#
# When *not* to use transactional fixtures:
# 1. You're testing whether a transaction works correctly. Nested transactions don't commit until all parent transactions commit,
# particularly, the fixtures transaction which is begun in setup and rolled back in teardown. Thus, you won't be able to verify
# the results of your transaction until Active Record supports nested transactions or savepoints (in progress.)
# 2. Your database does not support transactions. Every Active Record database supports transactions except MySQL MyISAM.
# Use InnoDB, MaxDB, or NDB instead.
class Fixtures < YAML::Omap
DEFAULT_FILTER_RE = /\.ya?ml$/
def self.instantiate_fixtures(object, table_name, fixtures, load_instances=true)
object.instance_variable_set "@#{table_name.to_s.gsub('.','_')}", fixtures
if load_instances
ActiveRecord::Base.silence do
fixtures.each do |name, fixture|
begin
object.instance_variable_set "@#{name}", fixture.find
rescue FixtureClassNotFound
nil
end
end
end
end
end
def self.instantiate_all_loaded_fixtures(object, load_instances=true)
all_loaded_fixtures.each do |table_name, fixtures|
Fixtures.instantiate_fixtures(object, table_name, fixtures, load_instances)
end
end
cattr_accessor :all_loaded_fixtures
self.all_loaded_fixtures = {}
def self.create_fixtures(fixtures_directory, table_names, class_names = {})
table_names = [table_names].flatten.map { |n| n.to_s }
connection = block_given? ? yield : ActiveRecord::Base.connection
ActiveRecord::Base.silence do
fixtures_map = {}
fixtures = table_names.map do |table_name|
fixtures_map[table_name] = Fixtures.new(connection, File.split(table_name.to_s).last, class_names[table_name.to_sym], File.join(fixtures_directory, table_name.to_s))
end
all_loaded_fixtures.merge! fixtures_map
connection.transaction do
fixtures.reverse.each { |fixture| fixture.delete_existing_fixtures }
fixtures.each { |fixture| fixture.insert_fixtures }
# Cap primary key sequences to max(pk).
if connection.respond_to?(:reset_pk_sequence!)
table_names.each do |table_name|
connection.reset_pk_sequence!(table_name)
end
end
end
return fixtures.size > 1 ? fixtures : fixtures.first
end
end
attr_reader :table_name
def initialize(connection, table_name, class_name, fixture_path, file_filter = DEFAULT_FILTER_RE)
@connection, @table_name, @fixture_path, @file_filter = connection, table_name, fixture_path, file_filter
@class_name = class_name ||
(ActiveRecord::Base.pluralize_table_names ? @table_name.singularize.camelize : @table_name.camelize)
@table_name = ActiveRecord::Base.table_name_prefix + @table_name + ActiveRecord::Base.table_name_suffix
read_fixture_files
end
def delete_existing_fixtures
@connection.delete "DELETE FROM #{@table_name}", 'Fixture Delete'
end
def insert_fixtures
values.each do |fixture|
@connection.execute "INSERT INTO #{@table_name} (#{fixture.key_list}) VALUES (#{fixture.value_list})", 'Fixture Insert'
end
end
private
def read_fixture_files
if File.file?(yaml_file_path)
# YAML fixtures
begin
yaml_string = ""
Dir["#{@fixture_path}/**/*.yml"].select {|f| test(?f,f) }.each do |subfixture_path|
yaml_string << IO.read(subfixture_path)
end
yaml_string << IO.read(yaml_file_path)
if yaml = YAML::load(erb_render(yaml_string))
yaml = yaml.value if yaml.respond_to?(:type_id) and yaml.respond_to?(:value)
yaml.each do |name, data|
self[name] = Fixture.new(data, @class_name)
end
end
rescue Exception=>boom
raise Fixture::FormatError, "a YAML error occured parsing #{yaml_file_path}. Please note that YAML must be consistently indented using spaces. Tabs are not allowed. Please have a look at http://www.yaml.org/faq.html\nThe exact error was:\n #{boom.class}: #{boom}"
end
elsif File.file?(csv_file_path)
# CSV fixtures
reader = CSV::Reader.create(erb_render(IO.read(csv_file_path)))
header = reader.shift
i = 0
reader.each do |row|
data = {}
row.each_with_index { |cell, j| data[header[j].to_s.strip] = cell.to_s.strip }
self["#{Inflector::underscore(@class_name)}_#{i+=1}"]= Fixture.new(data, @class_name)
end
elsif File.file?(deprecated_yaml_file_path)
raise Fixture::FormatError, ".yml extension required: rename #{deprecated_yaml_file_path} to #{yaml_file_path}"
else
# Standard fixtures
Dir.entries(@fixture_path).each do |file|
path = File.join(@fixture_path, file)
if File.file?(path) and file !~ @file_filter
self[file] = Fixture.new(path, @class_name)
end
end
end
end
def yaml_file_path
"#{@fixture_path}.yml"
end
def deprecated_yaml_file_path
"#{@fixture_path}.yaml"
end
def csv_file_path
@fixture_path + ".csv"
end
def yaml_fixtures_key(path)
File.basename(@fixture_path).split(".").first
end
def erb_render(fixture_content)
ERB.new(fixture_content).result
end
end
class Fixture #:nodoc:
include Enumerable
class FixtureError < StandardError#:nodoc:
end
class FormatError < FixtureError#:nodoc:
end
def initialize(fixture, class_name)
case fixture
when Hash, YAML::Omap
@fixture = fixture
when String
@fixture = read_fixture_file(fixture)
else
raise ArgumentError, "Bad fixture argument #{fixture.inspect}"
end
@class_name = class_name
end
def each
@fixture.each { |item| yield item }
end
def [](key)
@fixture[key]
end
def to_hash
@fixture
end
def key_list
columns = @fixture.keys.collect{ |column_name| ActiveRecord::Base.connection.quote_column_name(column_name) }
columns.join(", ")
end
def value_list
@fixture.values.map { |v| ActiveRecord::Base.connection.quote(v).gsub('\\n', "\n").gsub('\\r', "\r") }.join(", ")
end
def find
klass = @class_name.is_a?(Class) ? @class_name : Object.const_get(@class_name) rescue nil
if klass
klass.find(self[klass.primary_key])
else
raise FixtureClassNotFound, "The class #{@class_name.inspect} was not found."
end
end
private
def read_fixture_file(fixture_file_path)
IO.readlines(fixture_file_path).inject({}) do |fixture, line|
# Mercifully skip empty lines.
next if line =~ /^\s*$/
# Use the same regular expression for attributes as Active Record.
unless md = /^\s*([a-zA-Z][-_\w]*)\s*=>\s*(.+)\s*$/.match(line)
raise FormatError, "#{fixture_file_path}: fixture format error at '#{line}'. Expecting 'key => value'."
end
key, value = md.captures
# Disallow duplicate keys to catch typos.
raise FormatError, "#{fixture_file_path}: duplicate '#{key}' in fixture." if fixture[key]
fixture[key] = value.strip
fixture
end
end
end
module Test #:nodoc:
module Unit #:nodoc:
class TestCase #:nodoc:
cattr_accessor :fixture_path
class_inheritable_accessor :fixture_table_names
class_inheritable_accessor :fixture_class_names
class_inheritable_accessor :use_transactional_fixtures
class_inheritable_accessor :use_instantiated_fixtures # true, false, or :no_instances
class_inheritable_accessor :pre_loaded_fixtures
self.fixture_table_names = []
self.use_transactional_fixtures = false
self.use_instantiated_fixtures = true
self.pre_loaded_fixtures = false
self.fixture_class_names = {}
@@already_loaded_fixtures = {}
self.fixture_class_names = {}
def self.set_fixture_class(class_names = {})
self.fixture_class_names = self.fixture_class_names.merge(class_names)
end
def self.fixtures(*table_names)
table_names = table_names.flatten.map { |n| n.to_s }
self.fixture_table_names |= table_names
require_fixture_classes(table_names)
setup_fixture_accessors(table_names)
end
def self.require_fixture_classes(table_names=nil)
(table_names || fixture_table_names).each do |table_name|
file_name = table_name.to_s
file_name = file_name.singularize if ActiveRecord::Base.pluralize_table_names
begin
require file_name
rescue LoadError
# Let's hope the developer has included it himself
end
end
end
def self.setup_fixture_accessors(table_names=nil)
(table_names || fixture_table_names).each do |table_name|
table_name = table_name.to_s.tr('.','_')
define_method(table_name) do |fixture, *optionals|
force_reload = optionals.shift
@fixture_cache[table_name] ||= Hash.new
@fixture_cache[table_name][fixture] = nil if force_reload
if @loaded_fixtures[table_name][fixture.to_s]
@fixture_cache[table_name][fixture] ||= @loaded_fixtures[table_name][fixture.to_s].find
else
raise StandardError, "No fixture with name '#{fixture}' found for table '#{table_name}'"
end
end
end
end
def self.uses_transaction(*methods)
@uses_transaction ||= []
@uses_transaction.concat methods.map { |m| m.to_s }
end
def self.uses_transaction?(method)
@uses_transaction && @uses_transaction.include?(method.to_s)
end
def use_transactional_fixtures?
use_transactional_fixtures &&
!self.class.uses_transaction?(method_name)
end
def setup_with_fixtures
if pre_loaded_fixtures && !use_transactional_fixtures
raise RuntimeError, 'pre_loaded_fixtures requires use_transactional_fixtures'
end
@fixture_cache = Hash.new
# Load fixtures once and begin transaction.
if use_transactional_fixtures?
if @@already_loaded_fixtures[self.class]
@loaded_fixtures = @@already_loaded_fixtures[self.class]
else
load_fixtures
@@already_loaded_fixtures[self.class] = @loaded_fixtures
end
ActiveRecord::Base.lock_mutex
ActiveRecord::Base.connection.begin_db_transaction
# Load fixtures for every test.
else
@@already_loaded_fixtures[self.class] = nil
load_fixtures
end
# Instantiate fixtures for every test if requested.
instantiate_fixtures if use_instantiated_fixtures
end
alias_method :setup, :setup_with_fixtures
def teardown_with_fixtures
# Rollback changes.
if use_transactional_fixtures?
ActiveRecord::Base.connection.rollback_db_transaction
ActiveRecord::Base.unlock_mutex
end
ActiveRecord::Base.verify_active_connections!
end
alias_method :teardown, :teardown_with_fixtures
def self.method_added(method)
case method.to_s
when 'setup'
unless method_defined?(:setup_without_fixtures)
alias_method :setup_without_fixtures, :setup
define_method(:setup) do
setup_with_fixtures
setup_without_fixtures
end
end
when 'teardown'
unless method_defined?(:teardown_without_fixtures)
alias_method :teardown_without_fixtures, :teardown
define_method(:teardown) do
teardown_without_fixtures
teardown_with_fixtures
end
end
end
end
private
def load_fixtures
@loaded_fixtures = {}
fixtures = Fixtures.create_fixtures(fixture_path, fixture_table_names, fixture_class_names)
unless fixtures.nil?
if fixtures.instance_of?(Fixtures)
@loaded_fixtures[fixtures.table_name] = fixtures
else
fixtures.each { |f| @loaded_fixtures[f.table_name] = f }
end
end
end
# for pre_loaded_fixtures, only require the classes once. huge speed improvement
@@required_fixture_classes = false
def instantiate_fixtures
if pre_loaded_fixtures
raise RuntimeError, 'Load fixtures before instantiating them.' if Fixtures.all_loaded_fixtures.empty?
unless @@required_fixture_classes
self.class.require_fixture_classes Fixtures.all_loaded_fixtures.keys
@@required_fixture_classes = true
end
Fixtures.instantiate_all_loaded_fixtures(self, load_instances?)
else
raise RuntimeError, 'Load fixtures before instantiating them.' if @loaded_fixtures.nil?
@loaded_fixtures.each do |table_name, fixtures|
Fixtures.instantiate_fixtures(self, table_name, fixtures, load_instances?)
end
end
end
def load_instances?
use_instantiated_fixtures != :no_instances
end
end
end
end
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