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Revert "update ActionMailer::Base documentation [ci skip]"

This reverts commit f5654e7.

Conflicts:
	actionmailer/lib/action_mailer/base.rb

Reason: @frodsan asked me to revert since this change is breaking the
documentation in the edge API site
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commit 0e288ec98cb064479036dc7245903b7340051872 1 parent 7174307
@rafaelfranca rafaelfranca authored
Showing with 216 additions and 258 deletions.
  1. +216 −258 actionmailer/lib/action_mailer/base.rb
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474 actionmailer/lib/action_mailer/base.rb
@@ -8,101 +8,91 @@
require 'action_mailer/log_subscriber'
module ActionMailer
- # = Action Mailer
+ # Action Mailer allows you to send email from your application using a mailer model and views.
#
- # Action Mailer allows you to send email from your application using a mailer
- # model and views.
- #
- # == Mailer Models
+ # = Mailer Models
#
# To use Action Mailer, you need to create a mailer model.
#
# $ rails generate mailer Notifier
#
- # The generated model inherits from <tt>ActionMailer::Base</tt>. A mailer
- # model defines methods used to generate an email message. In these methods,
- # you can setup variables to be used in the mailer views, options on the mail
- # itself such as the <tt>:from</tt> address, and attachments.
+ # The generated model inherits from <tt>ActionMailer::Base</tt>. A mailer model defines methods
+ # used to generate an email message. In these methods, you can setup variables to be used in
+ # the mailer views, options on the mail itself such as the <tt>:from</tt> address, and attachments.
#
# Examples:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
- # default from: 'no-reply@example.com',
- # return_path: 'system@example.com'
+ # default :from => 'no-reply@example.com',
+ # :return_path => 'system@example.com'
#
# def welcome(recipient)
# @account = recipient
- # mail(to: recipient.email_address_with_name,
- # bcc: ['bcc@example.com', 'Order Watcher <watcher@example.com>'])
+ # mail(:to => recipient.email_address_with_name,
+ # :bcc => ["bcc@example.com", "Order Watcher <watcher@example.com>"])
# end
# end
#
# Within the mailer method, you have access to the following methods:
#
- # * <tt>attachments[]=</tt> - Allows you to add attachments to your email in
- # an intuitive manner; <tt>attachments['filename.png'] = File.read('path/to/filename.png')</tt>.
+ # * <tt>attachments[]=</tt> - Allows you to add attachments to your email in an intuitive
+ # manner; <tt>attachments['filename.png'] = File.read('path/to/filename.png')</tt>
#
- # * <tt>attachments.inline[]=</tt> - Allows you to add an inline attachment to
- # your email in the same manner as <tt>attachments[]=</tt>.
+ # * <tt>attachments.inline[]=</tt> - Allows you to add an inline attachment to your email
+ # in the same manner as <tt>attachments[]=</tt>
#
- # * <tt>headers[]=</tt> - Allows you to specify any header field in your email
- # such as <tt>headers['X-No-Spam'] = 'True'</tt>. Note, while most fields
- # like <tt>To:</tt> or <tt>From:</tt> can only appear once in an email
- # header, other fields like <tt>X-Anything</tt> can appear multiple times.
- # If you want to change a field that can appear multiple times, you need to
- # set it to nil first so that Mail knows you are replacing it and not adding
+ # * <tt>headers[]=</tt> - Allows you to specify any header field in your email such
+ # as <tt>headers['X-No-Spam'] = 'True'</tt>. Note, while most fields like <tt>To:</tt>
+ # <tt>From:</tt> can only appear once in an email header, other fields like <tt>X-Anything</tt>
+ # can appear multiple times. If you want to change a field that can appear multiple times,
+ # you need to set it to nil first so that Mail knows you are replacing it and not adding
# another field of the same name.
#
- # * <tt>headers(hash)</tt> - Allows you to specify multiple headers in your
- # email such as <tt>headers({'X-No-Spam' => 'True', 'In-Reply-To' => '1234@message.id'})</tt>.
+ # * <tt>headers(hash)</tt> - Allows you to specify multiple headers in your email such
+ # as <tt>headers({'X-No-Spam' => 'True', 'In-Reply-To' => '1234@message.id'})</tt>
#
# * <tt>mail</tt> - Allows you to specify email to be sent.
#
- # The hash passed to the mail method allows you to specify any header that a
- # <tt>Mail::Message</tt> will accept (any valid Email header including
- # optional fields).
+ # The hash passed to the mail method allows you to specify any header that a Mail::Message
+ # will accept (any valid Email header including optional fields).
#
- # The mail method, if not passed a block, will inspect your views and send all
- # the views with the same name as the method, so the above action would send
- # the +welcome.text.erb+ view file as well as the +welcome.text.html.erb+ view
- # file in a +multipart/alternative+ email.
+ # The mail method, if not passed a block, will inspect your views and send all the views with
+ # the same name as the method, so the above action would send the +welcome.text.erb+ view
+ # file as well as the +welcome.text.html.erb+ view file in a +multipart/alternative+ email.
#
# If you want to explicitly render only certain templates, pass a block:
#
- # mail(to: user.email) do |format|
+ # mail(:to => user.email) do |format|
# format.text
# format.html
# end
#
# The block syntax is also useful in providing information specific to a part:
#
- # mail(to: user.email) do |format|
- # format.text(content_transfer_encoding: 'base64')
+ # mail(:to => user.email) do |format|
+ # format.text(:content_transfer_encoding => "base64")
# format.html
# end
#
# Or even to render a special view:
#
- # mail(to: user.email) do |format|
+ # mail(:to => user.email) do |format|
# format.text
- # format.html { render 'some_other_template' }
+ # format.html { render "some_other_template" }
# end
#
- # == Mailer views
+ # = Mailer views
#
- # Like Action Controller, each mailer class has a corresponding view directory
- # in which each method of the class looks for a template with its name.
+ # Like Action Controller, each mailer class has a corresponding view directory in which each
+ # method of the class looks for a template with its name.
#
- # To define a template to be used with a mailing, create an <tt>.erb</tt> file
- # with the same name as the method in your mailer model. For example, in the
- # mailer defined above, the template at <tt>app/views/notifier/welcome.text.erb</tt>
- # would be used to generate the email.
+ # To define a template to be used with a mailing, create an <tt>.erb</tt> file with the same
+ # name as the method in your mailer model. For example, in the mailer defined above, the template at
+ # <tt>app/views/notifier/welcome.text.erb</tt> would be used to generate the email.
#
- # Variables defined in the model are accessible as instance variables in the
- # view.
+ # Variables defined in the model are accessible as instance variables in the view.
#
- # Emails by default are sent in plain text, so a sample view for our model
- # example might look like this:
+ # Emails by default are sent in plain text, so a sample view for our model example might look like this:
#
# Hi <%= @account.name %>,
# Thanks for joining our service! Please check back often.
@@ -110,191 +100,170 @@ module ActionMailer
# You can even use Action Pack helpers in these views. For example:
#
# You got a new note!
- # <%= truncate(@note.body, length: 25) %>
+ # <%= truncate(@note.body, :length => 25) %>
#
- # If you need to access the subject, from or the recipients in the view, you
- # can do that through message object:
+ # If you need to access the subject, from or the recipients in the view, you can do that through message object:
#
# You got a new note from <%= message.from %>!
- # <%= truncate(@note.body, length: 25) %>
+ # <%= truncate(@note.body, :length => 25) %>
#
#
- # == Generating URLs
+ # = Generating URLs
#
- # URLs can be generated in mailer views using <tt>url_for</tt> or named routes.
- # Unlike controllers from Action Pack, the mailer instance doesn't have any
- # context about the incoming request, so you'll need to provide all of the
- # details needed to generate a URL.
+ # URLs can be generated in mailer views using <tt>url_for</tt> or named routes. Unlike controllers from
+ # Action Pack, the mailer instance doesn't have any context about the incoming request, so you'll need
+ # to provide all of the details needed to generate a URL.
#
- # When using <tt>url_for</tt> you'll need to provide the <tt>:host</tt>,
- # <tt>:controller</tt>, and <tt>:action</tt>:
+ # When using <tt>url_for</tt> you'll need to provide the <tt>:host</tt>, <tt>:controller</tt>, and <tt>:action</tt>:
#
- # <%= url_for(host: 'example.com', controller: 'welcome', action: 'greeting') %>
+ # <%= url_for(:host => "example.com", :controller => "welcome", :action => "greeting") %>
#
# When using named routes you only need to supply the <tt>:host</tt>:
#
- # <%= users_url(host: 'example.com') %>
+ # <%= users_url(:host => "example.com") %>
#
- # You should use the <tt>named_route_url</tt> style (which generates absolute
- # URLs) and avoid using the <tt>named_route_path</tt> style (which generates
- # relative URLs), since clients reading the mail will have no concept of a
- # current URL from which to determine a relative path.
+ # You should use the <tt>named_route_url</tt> style (which generates absolute URLs) and avoid using the
+ # <tt>named_route_path</tt> style (which generates relative URLs), since clients reading the mail will
+ # have no concept of a current URL from which to determine a relative path.
#
- # It is also possible to set a default host that will be used in all mailers
- # by setting the <tt>:host</tt> option as a configuration option in
- # <tt>config/application.rb</tt>:
+ # It is also possible to set a default host that will be used in all mailers by setting the <tt>:host</tt>
+ # option as a configuration option in <tt>config/application.rb</tt>:
#
- # config.action_mailer.default_url_options = { host: 'example.com' }
+ # config.action_mailer.default_url_options = { :host => "example.com" }
#
- # When you decide to set a default <tt>:host</tt> for your mailers, then you
- # need to make sure to use the <tt>only_path: false</tt> option when using
- # <tt>url_for</tt>. Since the <tt>url_for</tt> view helper will generate
- # relative URLs by default when a <tt>:host</tt> option isn't explicitly
- # provided, passing <tt>only_path: false</tt> will ensure that absolute URLs
- # are generated.
+ # When you decide to set a default <tt>:host</tt> for your mailers, then you need to make sure to use the
+ # <tt>:only_path => false</tt> option when using <tt>url_for</tt>. Since the <tt>url_for</tt> view helper
+ # will generate relative URLs by default when a <tt>:host</tt> option isn't explicitly provided, passing
+ # <tt>:only_path => false</tt> will ensure that absolute URLs are generated.
#
- # == Sending mail
+ # = Sending mail
#
- # Once a mailer action and template are defined, you can deliver your message
- # or create it and save it for delivery later:
+ # Once a mailer action and template are defined, you can deliver your message or create it and save it
+ # for delivery later:
#
# Notifier.welcome(david).deliver # sends the email
# mail = Notifier.welcome(david) # => a Mail::Message object
# mail.deliver # sends the email
#
- # You never instantiate your mailer class. Rather, you just call the method
- # you defined on the class itself.
+ # You never instantiate your mailer class. Rather, you just call the method you defined on the class itself.
#
# = Multipart Emails
#
- # Multipart messages can also be used implicitly because Action Mailer will
- # automatically detect and use multipart templates, where each template is
- # named after the name of the action, followed by the content type. Each such
- # detected template will be added as a separate part to the message.
+ # Multipart messages can also be used implicitly because Action Mailer will automatically detect and use
+ # multipart templates, where each template is named after the name of the action, followed by the content
+ # type. Each such detected template will be added as a separate part to the message.
#
# For example, if the following templates exist:
- #
# * signup_notification.text.erb
# * signup_notification.text.html.erb
# * signup_notification.text.xml.builder
# * signup_notification.text.yaml.erb
#
- # Each would be rendered and added as a separate part to the message, with the
- # corresponding content type. The content type for the entire message is
- # automatically set to <tt>multipart/alternative</tt>, which indicates that
- # the email contains multiple different representations of the same email
- # body. The same instance variables defined in the action are passed to all
- # email templates.
+ # Each would be rendered and added as a separate part to the message, with the corresponding content
+ # type. The content type for the entire message is automatically set to <tt>multipart/alternative</tt>,
+ # which indicates that the email contains multiple different representations of the same email
+ # body. The same instance variables defined in the action are passed to all email templates.
#
- # Implicit template rendering is not performed if any attachments or parts
- # have been added to the email. This means that you'll have to manually add
- # each part to the email and set the content type of the email to
- # <tt>multipart/alternative</tt>.
+ # Implicit template rendering is not performed if any attachments or parts have been added to the email.
+ # This means that you'll have to manually add each part to the email and set the content type of the email
+ # to <tt>multipart/alternative</tt>.
#
- # == Attachments
+ # = Attachments
#
# Sending attachment in emails is easy:
#
# class ApplicationMailer < ActionMailer::Base
# def welcome(recipient)
# attachments['free_book.pdf'] = File.read('path/to/file.pdf')
- # mail(to: recipient, subject: 'New account information')
+ # mail(:to => recipient, :subject => "New account information")
# end
# end
#
- # Which will (if it had both a <tt>welcome.text.erb</tt> and
- # <tt>welcome.text.html.erb</tt> template in the view directory), send a
- # complete <tt>multipart/mixed</tt> email with two parts, the first part being
- # a <tt>multipart/alternative</tt> with the text and HTML email parts inside,
- # and the second being a <tt>application/pdf</tt> with a Base64 encoded copy
- # of the file.pdf book with the filename +free_book.pdf+.
+ # Which will (if it had both a <tt>welcome.text.erb</tt> and <tt>welcome.text.html.erb</tt>
+ # template in the view directory), send a complete <tt>multipart/mixed</tt> email with two parts,
+ # the first part being a <tt>multipart/alternative</tt> with the text and HTML email parts inside,
+ # and the second being a <tt>application/pdf</tt> with a Base64 encoded copy of the file.pdf book
+ # with the filename +free_book.pdf+.
#
- # If you need to send attachments with no content, you need to create an empty
- # view for it, or add an empty body parameter like this:
+ # If you need to send attachments with no content, you need to create an empty view for it,
+ # or add an empty body parameter like this:
#
# class ApplicationMailer < ActionMailer::Base
# def welcome(recipient)
# attachments['free_book.pdf'] = File.read('path/to/file.pdf')
- # mail(to: recipient, subject: 'New account information', body: '')
+ # mail(:to => recipient, :subject => "New account information", :body => "")
# end
# end
#
- # == Inline Attachments
+ # = Inline Attachments
#
- # You can also specify that a file should be displayed inline with other HTML.
- # This is useful if you want to display a corporate logo or a photo.
+ # You can also specify that a file should be displayed inline with other HTML. This is useful
+ # if you want to display a corporate logo or a photo.
#
# class ApplicationMailer < ActionMailer::Base
# def welcome(recipient)
# attachments.inline['photo.png'] = File.read('path/to/photo.png')
- # mail(to: recipient, subject: 'Here is what we look like')
+ # mail(:to => recipient, :subject => "Here is what we look like")
# end
# end
#
- # And then to reference the image in the view, you create a
- # <tt>welcome.html.erb</tt> file and make a call to +image_tag+ passing in the
- # attachment you want to display and then call +url+ on the attachment to get
- # the relative content id path for the image source:
+ # And then to reference the image in the view, you create a <tt>welcome.html.erb</tt> file and
+ # make a call to +image_tag+ passing in the attachment you want to display and then call
+ # +url+ on the attachment to get the relative content id path for the image source:
#
# <h1>Please Don't Cringe</h1>
#
# <%= image_tag attachments['photo.png'].url -%>
#
- # As we are using Action View's +image_tag+ method, you can pass in any other
- # options you want:
+ # As we are using Action View's +image_tag+ method, you can pass in any other options you want:
#
# <h1>Please Don't Cringe</h1>
#
- # <%= image_tag attachments['photo.png'].url, alt: 'Our Photo', class: 'photo' -%>
+ # <%= image_tag attachments['photo.png'].url, :alt => 'Our Photo', :class => 'photo' -%>
#
- # == Observing and Intercepting Mails
+ # = Observing and Intercepting Mails
#
- # Action Mailer provides hooks into the Mail observer and interceptor methods.
- # These allow you to register classes that are called during the mail delivery
- # life cycle.
+ # Action Mailer provides hooks into the Mail observer and interceptor methods. These allow you to
+ # register classes that are called during the mail delivery life cycle.
#
- # An observer class must implement the <tt>:delivered_email(message)</tt>
- # method which will be called once for every email sent after the email has
- # been sent.
+ # An observer class must implement the <tt>:delivered_email(message)</tt> method which will be
+ # called once for every email sent after the email has been sent.
#
- # An interceptor class must implement the <tt>:delivering_email(message)</tt>
- # method which will be called before the email is sent, allowing you to make
- # modifications to the email before it hits the delivery agents. Your class
- # should make any needed modifications directly to the passed in
- # <tt>Mail::Message</tt> instance.
+ # An interceptor class must implement the <tt>:delivering_email(message)</tt> method which will be
+ # called before the email is sent, allowing you to make modifications to the email before it hits
+ # the delivery agents. Your class should make any needed modifications directly to the passed
+ # in Mail::Message instance.
#
- # == Default Hash
+ # = Default Hash
#
- # Action Mailer provides some intelligent defaults for your emails, these are
- # usually specified in a default method inside the class definition:
+ # Action Mailer provides some intelligent defaults for your emails, these are usually specified in a
+ # default method inside the class definition:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
- # default sender: 'system@example.com'
+ # default :sender => 'system@example.com'
# end
#
- # You can pass in any header value that a <tt>Mail::Message</tt> accepts. Out
- # of the box, <tt>ActionMailer::Base</tt> sets the following:
+ # You can pass in any header value that a <tt>Mail::Message</tt> accepts. Out of the box,
+ # <tt>ActionMailer::Base</tt> sets the following:
#
- # * <tt>mime_version: '1.0'</tt>
- # * <tt>charset: 'UTF-8',</tt>
- # * <tt>content_type: 'text/plain',</tt>
- # * <tt>parts_order: [ 'text/plain', 'text/enriched', 'text/html' ]</tt>
+ # * <tt>:mime_version => "1.0"</tt>
+ # * <tt>:charset => "UTF-8",</tt>
+ # * <tt>:content_type => "text/plain",</tt>
+ # * <tt>:parts_order => [ "text/plain", "text/enriched", "text/html" ]</tt>
#
- # <tt>parts_order</tt> and <tt>charset</tt> are not actually valid
- # <tt>Mail::Message</tt> header fields, but Action Mailer translates them
- # appropriately and sets the correct values.
+ # <tt>parts_order</tt> and <tt>charset</tt> are not actually valid <tt>Mail::Message</tt> header fields,
+ # but Action Mailer translates them appropriately and sets the correct values.
#
- # As you can pass in any header, you need to either quote the header as a
- # string, or pass it in as an underscored symbol, so the following will work:
+ # As you can pass in any header, you need to either quote the header as a string, or pass it in as
+ # an underscored symbol, so the following will work:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
# default 'Content-Transfer-Encoding' => '7bit',
- # content_description: 'This is a description'
+ # :content_description => 'This is a description'
# end
#
- # Finally, Action Mailer also supports passing <tt>Proc</tt> objects into the
- # default hash, so you can define methods that evaluate as the message is
- # being generated:
+ # Finally, Action Mailer also supports passing <tt>Proc</tt> objects into the default hash, so you
+ # can define methods that evaluate as the message is being generated:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
# default 'X-Special-Header' => Proc.new { my_method }
@@ -306,23 +275,20 @@ module ActionMailer
# end
# end
#
- # Note that the proc is evaluated right at the start of the mail message
- # generation, so if you set something in the defaults using a proc, and then
- # set the same thing inside of your mailer method, it will get over written by
- # the mailer method.
+ # Note that the proc is evaluated right at the start of the mail message generation, so if you
+ # set something in the defaults using a proc, and then set the same thing inside of your
+ # mailer method, it will get over written by the mailer method.
#
- # It is also possible to set these default options that will be used in all
- # mailers through the <tt>default_options=</tt> configuration in
- # <tt>config/application.rb</tt>:
+ # It is also possible to set these default options that will be used in all mailers through
+ # the <tt>default_options=</tt> configuration in <tt>config/application.rb</tt>:
#
- # config.action_mailer.default_options = { from: 'no-reply@example.org' }
+ # config.action_mailer.default_options = { from: "no-reply@example.org" }
#
- # == Callbacks
+ # = Callbacks
#
- # You can specify callbacks using <tt>before_filter</tt> and <tt>after_filter</tt>
- # for configuring your messages. This may be useful, for example, when you
- # want to add default inline attachments for all messages sent out by a
- # certain mailer class:
+ # You can specify callbacks using before_filter and after_filter for configuring your messages.
+ # This may be useful, for example, when you want to add default inline attachments for all
+ # messages sent out by a certain mailer class:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
# before_filter :add_inline_attachment!
@@ -334,19 +300,18 @@ module ActionMailer
# private
#
# def add_inline_attachment!
- # attachments.inline['footer.jpg'] = File.read('/path/to/filename.jpg')
+ # attachments.inline["footer.jpg"] = File.read('/path/to/filename.jpg')
# end
# end
#
- # Callbacks in ActionMailer are implemented using <tt>AbstractController::Callbacks</tt>,
- # so you can define and configure callbacks in the same manner that you would
- # use callbacks in classes that inherit from ActionController::Base.
+ # Callbacks in ActionMailer are implemented using AbstractController::Callbacks, so you
+ # can define and configure callbacks in the same manner that you would use callbacks in
+ # classes that inherit from ActionController::Base.
#
- # Note that unless you have a specific reason to do so, you should prefer
- # using <tt>before_filter</tt> rather than <tt>after_filter</tt> in your
- # ActionMailer classes so that headers are parsed properly.
+ # Note that unless you have a specific reason to do so, you should prefer using before_filter
+ # rather than after_filter in your ActionMailer classes so that headers are parsed properly.
#
- # == Configuration options
+ # = Configuration options
#
# These options are specified on the class level, like
# <tt>ActionMailer::Base.raise_delivery_errors = true</tt>
@@ -416,7 +381,7 @@ class Base < AbstractController::Base
helper ActionMailer::MailHelper
- private_class_method :new # :nodoc:
+ private_class_method :new #:nodoc:
class_attribute :default_params
self.default_params = {
@@ -441,16 +406,16 @@ def register_interceptors(*interceptors)
end
# Register an Observer which will be notified when mail is delivered.
- # Either a class or a string can be passed in as the Observer. If a string
- # is passed in it will be <tt>constantize</tt>d.
+ # Either a class or a string can be passed in as the Observer. If a string is passed in
+ # it will be <tt>constantize</tt>d.
def register_observer(observer)
delivery_observer = (observer.is_a?(String) ? observer.constantize : observer)
Mail.register_observer(delivery_observer)
end
# Register an Interceptor which will be called before mail is sent.
- # Either a class or a string can be passed in as the Interceptor. If a
- # string is passed in it will be <tt>constantize</tt>d.
+ # Either a class or a string can be passed in as the Interceptor. If a string is passed in
+ # it will be <tt>constantize</tt>d.
def register_interceptor(interceptor)
delivery_interceptor = (interceptor.is_a?(String) ? interceptor.constantize : interceptor)
Mail.register_interceptor(delivery_interceptor)
@@ -466,9 +431,9 @@ def default(value = nil)
self.default_params = default_params.merge(value).freeze if value
default_params
end
- # Allows to set defaults through app configuration.
+ # Allows to set defaults through app configuration:
#
- # config.action_mailer.default_options = { from: 'no-reply@example.org' }
+ # config.action_mailer.default_options = { from: "no-reply@example.org" }
alias :default_options= :default
# Receives a raw email, parses it into an email object, decodes it,
@@ -490,26 +455,24 @@ def receive(raw_mail)
end
end
- # Wraps an email delivery inside of Active Support Notifications
- # instrumentation. This method is actually called by the <tt>Mail::Message</tt>
- # object itself through a callback when you call <tt>:deliver</tt> on the
- # <tt>Mail::Message</tt>, calling +deliver_mail+ directly and passing a
- # <tt>Mail::Message</tt> will do nothing except tell the logger you sent
- # the email.
- def deliver_mail(mail) # :nodoc:
+ # Wraps an email delivery inside of Active Support Notifications instrumentation. This
+ # method is actually called by the <tt>Mail::Message</tt> object itself through a callback
+ # when you call <tt>:deliver</tt> on the Mail::Message, calling +deliver_mail+ directly
+ # and passing a Mail::Message will do nothing except tell the logger you sent the email.
+ def deliver_mail(mail) #:nodoc:
ActiveSupport::Notifications.instrument("deliver.action_mailer") do |payload|
set_payload_for_mail(payload, mail)
yield # Let Mail do the delivery actions
end
end
- def respond_to?(method, include_private = false) # :nodoc:
+ def respond_to?(method, include_private = false) #:nodoc:
super || action_methods.include?(method.to_s)
end
protected
- def set_payload_for_mail(payload, mail) # :nodoc:
+ def set_payload_for_mail(payload, mail) #:nodoc:
payload[:mailer] = name
payload[:message_id] = mail.message_id
payload[:subject] = mail.subject
@@ -551,15 +514,15 @@ def mailer_name
self.class.mailer_name
end
- # Allows you to pass random and unusual headers to the new <tt>Mail::Message</tt>
- # object which will add them to itself.
+ # Allows you to pass random and unusual headers to the new <tt>Mail::Message</tt> object
+ # which will add them to itself.
#
- # headers['X-Special-Domain-Specific-Header'] = 'SecretValue'
+ # headers['X-Special-Domain-Specific-Header'] = "SecretValue"
#
- # You can also pass a hash into headers of header field names and values,
- # which will then be set on the <tt>Mail::Message</tt> object:
+ # You can also pass a hash into headers of header field names and values, which
+ # will then be set on the Mail::Message object:
#
- # headers 'X-Special-Domain-Specific-Header' => 'SecretValue',
+ # headers 'X-Special-Domain-Specific-Header' => "SecretValue",
# 'In-Reply-To' => incoming.message_id
#
# The resulting Mail::Message will have the following in its header:
@@ -577,24 +540,23 @@ def headers(args=nil)
#
# mail.attachments['filename.jpg'] = File.read('/path/to/filename.jpg')
#
- # If you do this, then Mail will take the file name and work out the mime
- # type set the Content-Type, Content-Disposition, Content-Transfer-Encoding
- # and base64 encode the contents of the attachment all for you.
+ # If you do this, then Mail will take the file name and work out the mime type
+ # set the Content-Type, Content-Disposition, Content-Transfer-Encoding and
+ # base64 encode the contents of the attachment all for you.
#
- # You can also specify overrides if you want by passing a hash instead of a
- # string:
+ # You can also specify overrides if you want by passing a hash instead of a string:
#
- # mail.attachments['filename.jpg'] = { mime_type: 'application/x-gzip',
- # content: File.read('/path/to/filename.jpg') }
+ # mail.attachments['filename.jpg'] = {:mime_type => 'application/x-gzip',
+ # :content => File.read('/path/to/filename.jpg')}
#
- # If you want to use a different encoding than Base64, you can pass an
- # encoding in, but then it is up to you to pass in the content pre-encoded,
- # and don't expect Mail to know how to decode this data:
+ # If you want to use a different encoding than Base64, you can pass an encoding in,
+ # but then it is up to you to pass in the content pre-encoded, and don't expect
+ # Mail to know how to decode this data:
#
# file_content = SpecialEncode(File.read('/path/to/filename.jpg'))
- # mail.attachments['filename.jpg'] = { mime_type: 'application/x-gzip',
- # encoding: 'SpecialEncoding',
- # content: file_content }
+ # mail.attachments['filename.jpg'] = {:mime_type => 'application/x-gzip',
+ # :encoding => 'SpecialEncoding',
+ # :content => file_content }
#
# You can also search for specific attachments:
#
@@ -603,102 +565,99 @@ def headers(args=nil)
#
# # or by index
# mail.attachments[0] # => Mail::Part (first attachment)
+ #
def attachments
@_message.attachments
end
- # The main method that creates the message and renders the email templates.
- # There are two ways to call this method, with a block, or without a block.
- #
- # Both methods accept a headers hash. This hash allows you to specify the
- # most used headers in an email message, these are:
- #
- # * <tt>:subject</tt> - The subject of the message, if this is omitted,
- # Action Mailer will ask the Rails I18n class for a translated
- # <tt>:subject</tt> in the scope of <tt>[mailer_scope, action_name]</tt>
- # or if this is missing, will translate the humanized version of the
- # <tt>action_name</tt>.
- # * <tt>:to</tt> - Who the message is destined for, can be a string of
- #  addresses, or an array of addresses.
- # * <tt>:from</tt> - Who the message is from.
- # * <tt>:cc</tt> - Who you would like to Carbon-Copy on this email, can be a
- # string of addresses, or an array of addresses.
- # * <tt>:bcc</tt> - Who you would like to Blind-Carbon-Copy on this email,
- # can be a string of addresses, or an array of addresses.
+ # The main method that creates the message and renders the email templates. There are
+ # two ways to call this method, with a block, or without a block.
+ #
+ # Both methods accept a headers hash. This hash allows you to specify the most used headers
+ # in an email message, these are:
+ #
+ # * <tt>:subject</tt> - The subject of the message, if this is omitted, Action Mailer will
+ # ask the Rails I18n class for a translated <tt>:subject</tt> in the scope of
+ # <tt>[mailer_scope, action_name]</tt> or if this is missing, will translate the
+ # humanized version of the <tt>action_name</tt>
+ # * <tt>:to</tt> - Who the message is destined for, can be a string of addresses, or an array
+ # of addresses.
+ # * <tt>:from</tt> - Who the message is from
+ # * <tt>:cc</tt> - Who you would like to Carbon-Copy on this email, can be a string of addresses,
+ # or an array of addresses.
+ # * <tt>:bcc</tt> - Who you would like to Blind-Carbon-Copy on this email, can be a string of
+ # addresses, or an array of addresses.
# * <tt>:reply_to</tt> - Who to set the Reply-To header of the email to.
# * <tt>:date</tt> - The date to say the email was sent on.
#
- # You can set default values for any of the above headers (except :date) by
- # using the +default+ class method:
+ # You can set default values for any of the above headers (except :date) by using the <tt>default</tt>
+ # class method:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
- # self.default from: 'no-reply@test.lindsaar.net',
- # bcc: 'email_logger@test.lindsaar.net',
- # reply_to: 'bounces@test.lindsaar.net'
+ # self.default :from => 'no-reply@test.lindsaar.net',
+ # :bcc => 'email_logger@test.lindsaar.net',
+ # :reply_to => 'bounces@test.lindsaar.net'
# end
#
# If you need other headers not listed above, you can either pass them in
# as part of the headers hash or use the <tt>headers['name'] = value</tt>
# method.
#
- # When a <tt>:return_path</tt> is specified as header, that value will be
- # used as the 'envelope from' address for the Mail message. Setting this is
- # useful when you want delivery notifications sent to a different address
- # than the one in <tt>:from</tt>. Mail will actually use the <tt>:return_path</tt>
- # in preference to the <tt>:sender</tt> in preference to the <tt>:from</tt>
+ # When a <tt>:return_path</tt> is specified as header, that value will be used as the 'envelope from'
+ # address for the Mail message. Setting this is useful when you want delivery notifications
+ # sent to a different address than the one in <tt>:from</tt>. Mail will actually use the
+ # <tt>:return_path</tt> in preference to the <tt>:sender</tt> in preference to the <tt>:from</tt>
# field for the 'envelope from' value.
#
- # If you do not pass a block to the +mail+ method, it will find all
- # templates in the view paths using by default the mailer name and the
- # method name that it is being called from, it will then create parts for
- # each of these templates intelligently, making educated guesses on correct
- # content type and sequence, and return a fully prepared <tt>Mail::Message</tt>
- # ready to call <tt>:deliver</tt> on to send.
+ # If you do not pass a block to the +mail+ method, it will find all templates in the
+ # view paths using by default the mailer name and the method name that it is being
+ # called from, it will then create parts for each of these templates intelligently,
+ # making educated guesses on correct content type and sequence, and return a fully
+ # prepared Mail::Message ready to call <tt>:deliver</tt> on to send.
#
# For example:
#
# class Notifier < ActionMailer::Base
- # default from: 'no-reply@test.lindsaar.net',
+ # default :from => 'no-reply@test.lindsaar.net',
#
# def welcome
- # mail(to: 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net')
+ # mail(:to => 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net')
# end
# end
#
# Will look for all templates at "app/views/notifier" with name "welcome".
- # If no welcome template exists, it will raise an <tt>ActionView::MissingTemplate</tt>
- # error.
+ # If no welcome template exists, it will raise an ActionView::MissingTemplate error.
#
# However, those can be customized:
#
- # mail(template_path: 'notifications', template_name: 'another')
+ # mail(:template_path => 'notifications', :template_name => 'another')
#
- # And now it will look for all templates at "app/views/notifications" with
- # name "another".
+ # And now it will look for all templates at "app/views/notifications" with name "another".
#
# If you do pass a block, you can render specific templates of your choice:
#
- # mail(to: 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net') do |format|
+ # mail(:to => 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net') do |format|
# format.text
# format.html
# end
#
# You can even render text directly without using a template:
#
- # mail(to: 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net') do |format|
- # format.text { render text: 'Hello Mikel!' }
- # format.html { render text: '<h1>Hello Mikel!</h1>' }
+ # mail(:to => 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net') do |format|
+ # format.text { render :text => "Hello Mikel!" }
+ # format.html { render :text => "<h1>Hello Mikel!</h1>" }
# end
#
- # Which will render a <tt>multipart/alternative</tt> email with
- # <tt>text/plain</tt> and <tt>text/html</tt> parts.
+ # Which will render a <tt>multipart/alternative</tt> email with <tt>text/plain</tt> and
+ # <tt>text/html</tt> parts.
#
# The block syntax also allows you to customize the part headers if desired:
#
- # mail(to: 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net') do |format|
- # format.text(content_transfer_encoding: 'base64')
+ # mail(:to => 'mikel@test.lindsaar.net') do |format|
+ # format.text(:content_transfer_encoding => "base64")
# format.html
# end
+ #
def mail(headers={}, &block)
m = @_message
@@ -763,11 +722,10 @@ def set_content_type(m, user_content_type, class_default)
end
end
- # Translates the +subject+ using Rails I18n class under
- # <tt>[mailer_scope, action_name]</tt> scope. If it does not find a
- # translation for the +subject+ under the specified scope it will default
- # to a humanized version of the <tt>action_name</tt>.
- def default_i18n_subject # :nodoc:
+ # Translates the +subject+ using Rails I18n class under <tt>[mailer_scope, action_name]</tt> scope.
+ # If it does not find a translation for the +subject+ under the specified scope it will default to a
+ # humanized version of the <tt>action_name</tt>.
+ def default_i18n_subject #:nodoc:
mailer_scope = self.class.mailer_name.tr('/', '.')
I18n.t(:subject, :scope => [mailer_scope, action_name], :default => action_name.humanize)
end

1 comment on commit 0e288ec

@frodsan

Thanks :+1:

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