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Merge branch 'master' of https://github.com/vijaydev/docrails into vi…

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commit 1b8f9d3d7ebacbd16994da09803eefe2fbc1669e 2 parents b911d88 + 61817d2
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22 railties/guides/source/routing.textile
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ h2. Rails Routing from the Outside In
This guide covers the user-facing features of Rails routing. By referring to this guide, you will be able to:
* Understand the code in +routes.rb+
-* Construct your own routes, using either the preferred resourceful style or with the <tt>match</tt> method
+* Construct your own routes, using either the preferred resourceful style or the <tt>match</tt> method
* Identify what parameters to expect an action to receive
* Automatically create paths and URLs using route helpers
* Use advanced techniques such as constraints and Rack endpoints
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ Resource routing allows you to quickly declare all of the common routes for a gi
h4. Resources on the Web
-Browsers request pages from Rails by making a request for a URL using a specific HTTP method, such as +GET+, +POST+, +PUT+ and +DELETE+. Each method is a request to perform an operation on the resource. A resource route maps a number of related request to the actions in a single controller.
+Browsers request pages from Rails by making a request for a URL using a specific HTTP method, such as +GET+, +POST+, +PUT+ and +DELETE+. Each method is a request to perform an operation on the resource. A resource route maps a number of related requests to actions in a single controller.
When your Rails application receives an incoming request for
@@ -470,7 +470,7 @@ This route would match paths such as +/photos/A12345+. You can more succinctly e
match 'photos/:id' => 'photos#show', :id => /[A-Z]\d{5}/
</ruby>
-+:constraints+ takes regular expression. However note that regexp anchors can't be used within constraints. For example following route will not work:
++:constraints+ takes regular expressions with the restriction that regexp anchors can't be used. For example, the following route will not work:
<ruby>
match '/:id' => 'posts#show', :constraints => {:id => /^\d/}
@@ -536,7 +536,7 @@ match 'photos/*other' => 'photos#unknown'
This route would match +photos/12+ or +/photos/long/path/to/12+, setting +params[:other]+ to +"12"+ or +"long/path/to/12"+.
-Wildcard segments do not need to be last in a route. For example
+Wildcard segments can occur anywhere in a route. For example,
<ruby>
match 'books/*section/:title' => 'books#show'
@@ -544,7 +544,7 @@ match 'books/*section/:title' => 'books#show'
would match +books/some/section/last-words-a-memoir+ with +params[:section]+ equals +"some/section"+, and +params[:title]+ equals +"last-words-a-memoir"+.
-Techincally a route can have even more than one wildard segment indeed, the matcher assigns segments to parameters in an intuitive way. For instance
+Technically a route can have even more than one wildcard segment. The matcher assigns segments to parameters in an intuitive way. For example,
<ruby>
match '*a/foo/*b' => 'test#index'
@@ -641,7 +641,7 @@ constraints(:id => /[A-Z][A-Z][0-9]+/) do
end
</ruby>
-NOTE: Of course, you can use the more advanced constraints available in non-resourceful routes in this context
+NOTE: Of course, you can use the more advanced constraints available in non-resourceful routes in this context.
h4. Overriding the Named Helpers
@@ -651,7 +651,7 @@ The +:as+ option lets you override the normal naming for the named route helpers
resources :photos, :as => "images"
</ruby>
-will recognize incoming paths beginning with +/photos+ and route the requests to +PhotosController+:
+will recognize incoming paths beginning with +/photos+ and route the requests to +PhotosController+, but use the value of the :as option to name the helpers.
|_.HTTP verb|_.Path |_.action |_.named helper |
|GET |/photos |index | images_path |
@@ -679,7 +679,7 @@ This would cause the routing to recognize paths such as
NOTE: The actual action names aren't changed by this option. The two paths shown would still route to the +new+ and +edit+ actions.
-TIP: If you find yourself wanting to change this option uniformly for all of your routes, you can use a scope:
+TIP: If you find yourself wanting to change this option uniformly for all of your routes, you can use a scope.
<ruby>
scope :path_names => { :new => "make" } do
@@ -715,7 +715,7 @@ NOTE: The +namespace+ scope will automatically add +:as+ as well as +:module+ an
h4. Restricting the Routes Created
-By default, Rails creates routes for all seven of the default actions (index, show, new, create, edit, update, and destroy) for every RESTful route in your application. You can use the +:only+ and +:except+ options to fine-tune this behavior. The +:only+ option tells Rails to create only the specified routes:
+By default, Rails creates routes for the seven default actions (index, show, new, create, edit, update, and destroy) for every RESTful route in your application. You can use the +:only+ and +:except+ options to fine-tune this behavior. The +:only+ option tells Rails to create only the specified routes:
<ruby>
resources :photos, :only => [:index, :show]
@@ -816,7 +816,7 @@ Routes should be included in your testing strategy (just like the rest of your a
h5. The +assert_generates+ Assertion
-Use +assert_generates+ to assert that a particular set of options generate a particular path. You can use this with default routes or custom routes
++assert_generates+ asserts that a particular set of options generate a particular path and can be used with default routes or custom routes.
<ruby>
assert_generates "/photos/1", { :controller => "photos", :action => "show", :id => "1" }
@@ -825,7 +825,7 @@ assert_generates "/about", :controller => "pages", :action => "about"
h5. The +assert_recognizes+ Assertion
-The +assert_recognizes+ assertion is the inverse of +assert_generates+. It asserts that Rails recognizes the given path and routes it to a particular spot in your application.
++assert_recognizes+ is the inverse of +assert_generates+. It asserts that a given path is recognized and routes it to a particular spot in your application.
<ruby>
assert_recognizes({ :controller => "photos", :action => "show", :id => "1" }, "/photos/1")
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4 railties/guides/source/testing.textile
@@ -183,7 +183,7 @@ class PostTest < ActiveSupport::TestCase
The +PostTest+ class defines a _test case_ because it inherits from +ActiveSupport::TestCase+. +PostTest+ thus has all the methods available from +ActiveSupport::TestCase+. You'll see those methods a little later in this guide.
<ruby>
-def test_truth
+def test_the_truth
</ruby>
Any method defined within a +Test::Unit+ test case that begins with +test+ (case sensitive) is simply called a test. So, +test_password+, +test_valid_password+ and +testValidPassword+ all are legal test names and are run automatically when the test case is run.
@@ -256,7 +256,7 @@ This will run all the test methods from the test case. Note that +test_helper.rb
You can also run a particular test method from the test case by using the +-n+ switch with the +test method name+.
<shell>
-$ ruby -Itest test/unit/post_test.rb -n test_truth
+$ ruby -Itest test/unit/post_test.rb -n test_the_truth
Loaded suite unit/post_test
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