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ensuring that description does not exceed 100 columns

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1 parent b8d9d9c commit 1ce40ca56216ae76e93cde78ec2752de110400c0 Neeraj Singh committed Aug 2, 2010
@@ -106,9 +106,10 @@ def construct_scope
:limit => @reflection.options[:limit] } }
end
- # Join tables with additional columns on top of the two foreign keys must be considered ambiguous unless a select
- # clause has been explicitly defined. Otherwise you can get broken records back, if, for example, the join column also has
- # an id column. This will then overwrite the id column of the records coming back.
+ # Join tables with additional columns on top of the two foreign keys must be considered
+ # ambiguous unless a select clause has been explicitly defined. Otherwise you can get
+ # broken records back, if, for example, the join column also has an id column. This will
+ # then overwrite the id column of the records coming back.
def finding_with_ambiguous_select?(select_clause)
!select_clause && columns.size != 2
end
@@ -24,9 +24,10 @@ def destroy(*records)
end
end
- # Returns the size of the collection by executing a SELECT COUNT(*) query if the collection hasn't been loaded and
- # calling collection.size if it has. If it's more likely than not that the collection does have a size larger than zero,
- # and you need to fetch that collection afterwards, it'll take one fewer SELECT query if you use #length.
+ # Returns the size of the collection by executing a SELECT COUNT(*) query if the collection hasn't been
+ # loaded and calling collection.size if it has. If it's more likely than not that the collection does
+ # have a size larger than zero, and you need to fetch that collection afterwards, it'll take one fewer
+ # SELECT query if you use #length.
def size
return @owner.send(:read_attribute, cached_counter_attribute_name) if has_cached_counter?
return @target.size if loaded?
@@ -14,7 +14,8 @@ module TimeZoneConversion
module ClassMethods
protected
# Defined for all +datetime+ and +timestamp+ attributes when +time_zone_aware_attributes+ are enabled.
- # This enhanced read method automatically converts the UTC time stored in the database to the time zone stored in Time.zone.
+ # This enhanced read method automatically converts the UTC time stored in the database to the time
+ # zone stored in Time.zone.
def define_method_attribute(attr_name)
if create_time_zone_conversion_attribute?(attr_name, columns_hash[attr_name])
method_body, line = <<-EOV, __LINE__ + 1
@@ -14,8 +14,8 @@ def define_method_attribute=(attr_name)
end
end
- # Updates the attribute identified by <tt>attr_name</tt> with the specified +value+. Empty strings for fixnum and float
- # columns are turned into +nil+.
+ # Updates the attribute identified by <tt>attr_name</tt> with the specified +value+. Empty strings
+ # for fixnum and float columns are turned into +nil+.
def write_attribute(attr_name, value)
attr_name = attr_name.to_s
attr_name = self.class.primary_key if attr_name == 'id'
@@ -26,8 +26,8 @@ module ActiveRecord
# <tt>after_rollback</tt>.
#
# That's a total of ten callbacks, which gives you immense power to react and prepare for each state in the
- # Active Record lifecycle. The sequence for calling <tt>Base#save</tt> for an existing record is similar, except that each
- # <tt>_on_create</tt> callback is replaced by the corresponding <tt>_on_update</tt> callback.
+ # Active Record lifecycle. The sequence for calling <tt>Base#save</tt> for an existing record is similar,
+ # except that each <tt>_on_create</tt> callback is replaced by the corresponding <tt>_on_update</tt> callback.
#
# Examples:
# class CreditCard < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -55,9 +55,9 @@ module ActiveRecord
#
# == Inheritable callback queues
#
- # Besides the overwritable callback methods, it's also possible to register callbacks through the use of the callback macros.
- # Their main advantage is that the macros add behavior into a callback queue that is kept intact down through an inheritance
- # hierarchy. Example:
+ # Besides the overwritable callback methods, it's also possible to register callbacks through the
+ # use of the callback macros. Their main advantage is that the macros add behavior into a callback
+ # queue that is kept intact down through an inheritance hierarchy.
#
# class Topic < ActiveRecord::Base
# before_destroy :destroy_author
@@ -67,9 +67,9 @@ module ActiveRecord
# before_destroy :destroy_readers
# end
#
- # Now, when <tt>Topic#destroy</tt> is run only +destroy_author+ is called. When <tt>Reply#destroy</tt> is run, both +destroy_author+ and
- # +destroy_readers+ are called. Contrast this to the situation where we've implemented the save behavior through overwriteable
- # methods:
+ # Now, when <tt>Topic#destroy</tt> is run only +destroy_author+ is called. When <tt>Reply#destroy</tt> is
+ # run, both +destroy_author+ and +destroy_readers+ are called. Contrast this to the situation where
+ # we've implemented the save behavior through overwriteable methods:
#
# class Topic < ActiveRecord::Base
# def before_destroy() destroy_author end
@@ -79,20 +79,21 @@ module ActiveRecord
# def before_destroy() destroy_readers end
# end
#
- # In that case, <tt>Reply#destroy</tt> would only run +destroy_readers+ and _not_ +destroy_author+. So, use the callback macros when
- # you want to ensure that a certain callback is called for the entire hierarchy, and use the regular overwriteable methods
- # when you want to leave it up to each descendant to decide whether they want to call +super+ and trigger the inherited callbacks.
+ # In that case, <tt>Reply#destroy</tt> would only run +destroy_readers+ and _not_ +destroy_author+.
+ # So, use the callback macros when you want to ensure that a certain callback is called for the entire
+ # hierarchy, and use the regular overwriteable methods when you want to leave it up to each descendant
+ # to decide whether they want to call +super+ and trigger the inherited callbacks.
#
- # *IMPORTANT:* In order for inheritance to work for the callback queues, you must specify the callbacks before specifying the
- # associations. Otherwise, you might trigger the loading of a child before the parent has registered the callbacks and they won't
- # be inherited.
+ # *IMPORTANT:* In order for inheritance to work for the callback queues, you must specify the
+ # callbacks before specifying the associations. Otherwise, you might trigger the loading of a
+ # child before the parent has registered the callbacks and they won't be inherited.
#
# == Types of callbacks
#
# There are four types of callbacks accepted by the callback macros: Method references (symbol), callback objects,
- # inline methods (using a proc), and inline eval methods (using a string). Method references and callback objects are the
- # recommended approaches, inline methods using a proc are sometimes appropriate (such as for creating mix-ins), and inline
- # eval methods are deprecated.
+ # inline methods (using a proc), and inline eval methods (using a string). Method references and callback objects
+ # are the recommended approaches, inline methods using a proc are sometimes appropriate (such as for
+ # creating mix-ins), and inline eval methods are deprecated.
#
# The method reference callbacks work by specifying a protected or private method available in the object, like this:
#
@@ -169,15 +170,15 @@ module ActiveRecord
# end
# end
#
- # The callback macros usually accept a symbol for the method they're supposed to run, but you can also pass a "method string",
- # which will then be evaluated within the binding of the callback. Example:
+ # The callback macros usually accept a symbol for the method they're supposed to run, but you can also
+ # pass a "method string", which will then be evaluated within the binding of the callback. Example:
#
# class Topic < ActiveRecord::Base
# before_destroy 'self.class.delete_all "parent_id = #{id}"'
# end
#
- # Notice that single quotes (') are used so the <tt>#{id}</tt> part isn't evaluated until the callback is triggered. Also note that these
- # inline callbacks can be stacked just like the regular ones:
+ # Notice that single quotes (') are used so the <tt>#{id}</tt> part isn't evaluated until the callback
+ # is triggered. Also note that these inline callbacks can be stacked just like the regular ones:
#
# class Topic < ActiveRecord::Base
# before_destroy 'self.class.delete_all "parent_id = #{id}"',
@@ -186,22 +187,24 @@ module ActiveRecord
#
# == The +after_find+ and +after_initialize+ exceptions
#
- # Because +after_find+ and +after_initialize+ are called for each object found and instantiated by a finder, such as <tt>Base.find(:all)</tt>, we've had
- # to implement a simple performance constraint (50% more speed on a simple test case). Unlike all the other callbacks, +after_find+ and
- # +after_initialize+ will only be run if an explicit implementation is defined (<tt>def after_find</tt>). In that case, all of the
+ # Because +after_find+ and +after_initialize+ are called for each object found and instantiated by a finder,
+ # such as <tt>Base.find(:all)</tt>, we've had to implement a simple performance constraint (50% more speed
+ # on a simple test case). Unlike all the other callbacks, +after_find+ and +after_initialize+ will only be
+ # run if an explicit implementation is defined (<tt>def after_find</tt>). In that case, all of the
# callback types will be called.
#
# == <tt>before_validation*</tt> returning statements
#
- # If the returning value of a +before_validation+ callback can be evaluated to +false+, the process will be aborted and <tt>Base#save</tt> will return +false+.
- # If Base#save! is called it will raise a ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid exception.
- # Nothing will be appended to the errors object.
+ # If the returning value of a +before_validation+ callback can be evaluated to +false+, the process will be
+ # aborted and <tt>Base#save</tt> will return +false+. If Base#save! is called it will raise a
+ # ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid exception. Nothing will be appended to the errors object.
#
# == Canceling callbacks
#
- # If a <tt>before_*</tt> callback returns +false+, all the later callbacks and the associated action are cancelled. If an <tt>after_*</tt> callback returns
- # +false+, all the later callbacks are cancelled. Callbacks are generally run in the order they are defined, with the exception of callbacks
- # defined as methods on the model, which are called last.
+ # If a <tt>before_*</tt> callback returns +false+, all the later callbacks and the associated action are
+ # cancelled. If an <tt>after_*</tt> callback returns +false+, all the later callbacks are cancelled.
+ # Callbacks are generally run in the order they are defined, with the exception of callbacks defined as
+ # methods on the model, which are called last.
#
# == Transactions
#
@@ -217,7 +220,8 @@ module ActiveRecord
#
# == Debugging callbacks
#
- # To list the methods and procs registered with a particular callback, append <tt>_callback_chain</tt> to the callback name that you wish to list and send that to your class from the Rails console:
+ # To list the methods and procs registered with a particular callback, append <tt>_callback_chain</tt> to
+ # the callback name that you wish to list and send that to your class from the Rails console:
#
# >> Topic.after_save_callback_chain
# => [#<ActiveSupport::Callbacks::Callback:0x3f6a448
@@ -23,7 +23,8 @@ module Format
#
# +name+ is the column's name, such as <tt>supplier_id</tt> in <tt>supplier_id int(11)</tt>.
# +default+ is the type-casted default value, such as +new+ in <tt>sales_stage varchar(20) default 'new'</tt>.
- # +sql_type+ is used to extract the column's length, if necessary. For example +60+ in <tt>company_name varchar(60)</tt>.
+ # +sql_type+ is used to extract the column's length, if necessary. For example +60+ in
+ # <tt>company_name varchar(60)</tt>.
# It will be mapped to one of the standard Rails SQL types in the <tt>type</tt> attribute.
# +null+ determines if this column allows +NULL+ values.
def initialize(name, default, sql_type = nil, null = true)
@@ -359,7 +360,8 @@ def [](name)
#
# Available options are (none of these exists by default):
# * <tt>:limit</tt> -
- # Requests a maximum column length. This is number of characters for <tt>:string</tt> and <tt>:text</tt> columns and number of bytes for :binary and :integer columns.
+ # Requests a maximum column length. This is number of characters for <tt>:string</tt> and
+ # <tt>:text</tt> columns and number of bytes for :binary and :integer columns.
# * <tt>:default</tt> -
# The column's default value. Use nil for NULL.
# * <tt>:null</tt> -
@@ -462,8 +464,8 @@ def [](name)
# TableDefinition#timestamps that'll add created_at and +updated_at+ as datetimes.
#
# TableDefinition#references will add an appropriately-named _id column, plus a corresponding _type
- # column if the <tt>:polymorphic</tt> option is supplied. If <tt>:polymorphic</tt> is a hash of options, these will be
- # used when creating the <tt>_type</tt> column. So what can be written like this:
+ # column if the <tt>:polymorphic</tt> option is supplied. If <tt>:polymorphic</tt> is a hash of
+ # options, these will be used when creating the <tt>_type</tt> column. So what can be written like this:
#
# create_table :taggings do |t|
# t.integer :tag_id, :tagger_id, :taggable_id
@@ -278,7 +278,8 @@ def select_rows(sql, name = nil)
rows
end
- # Executes a SQL query and returns a MySQL::Result object. Note that you have to free the Result object after you're done using it.
+ # Executes a SQL query and returns a MySQL::Result object. Note that you have to free
+ # the Result object after you're done using it.
def execute(sql, name = nil) #:nodoc:
if name == :skip_logging
@connection.query(sql)
@@ -183,10 +183,14 @@ module ConnectionAdapters
# * <tt>:username</tt> - Defaults to nothing.
# * <tt>:password</tt> - Defaults to nothing.
# * <tt>:database</tt> - The name of the database. No default, must be provided.
- # * <tt>:schema_search_path</tt> - An optional schema search path for the connection given as a string of comma-separated schema names. This is backward-compatible with the <tt>:schema_order</tt> option.
- # * <tt>:encoding</tt> - An optional client encoding that is used in a <tt>SET client_encoding TO <encoding></tt> call on the connection.
- # * <tt>:min_messages</tt> - An optional client min messages that is used in a <tt>SET client_min_messages TO <min_messages></tt> call on the connection.
- # * <tt>:allow_concurrency</tt> - If true, use async query methods so Ruby threads don't deadlock; otherwise, use blocking query methods.
+ # * <tt>:schema_search_path</tt> - An optional schema search path for the connection given
+ # as a string of comma-separated schema names. This is backward-compatible with the <tt>:schema_order</tt> option.
+ # * <tt>:encoding</tt> - An optional client encoding that is used in a <tt>SET client_encoding TO
+ # <encoding></tt> call on the connection.
+ # * <tt>:min_messages</tt> - An optional client min messages that is used in a
+ # <tt>SET client_min_messages TO <min_messages></tt> call on the connection.
+ # * <tt>:allow_concurrency</tt> - If true, use async query methods so Ruby threads don't deadlock;
+ # otherwise, use blocking query methods.
class PostgreSQLAdapter < AbstractAdapter
ADAPTER_NAME = 'PostgreSQL'.freeze
@@ -29,8 +29,8 @@ def binary_to_string(value)
end
end
- # The SQLite adapter works with both the 2.x and 3.x series of SQLite with the sqlite-ruby drivers (available both as gems and
- # from http://rubyforge.org/projects/sqlite-ruby/).
+ # The SQLite adapter works with both the 2.x and 3.x series of SQLite with the sqlite-ruby
+ # drivers (available both as gems and from http://rubyforge.org/projects/sqlite-ruby/).
#
# Options:
#
@@ -30,15 +30,17 @@ class AssociationTypeMismatch < ActiveRecordError
class SerializationTypeMismatch < ActiveRecordError
end
- # Raised when adapter not specified on connection (or configuration file <tt>config/database.yml</tt> misses adapter field).
+ # Raised when adapter not specified on connection (or configuration file <tt>config/database.yml</tt>
+ # misses adapter field).
class AdapterNotSpecified < ActiveRecordError
end
# Raised when Active Record cannot find database adapter specified in <tt>config/database.yml</tt> or programmatically.
class AdapterNotFound < ActiveRecordError
end
- # Raised when connection to the database could not been established (for example when <tt>connection=</tt> is given a nil object).
+ # Raised when connection to the database could not been established (for example when <tt>connection=</tt>
+ # is given a nil object).
class ConnectionNotEstablished < ActiveRecordError
end
@@ -51,7 +53,8 @@ class RecordNotFound < ActiveRecordError
class RecordNotSaved < ActiveRecordError
end
- # Raised when SQL statement cannot be executed by the database (for example, it's often the case for MySQL when Ruby driver used is too old).
+ # Raised when SQL statement cannot be executed by the database (for example, it's often the case for
+ # MySQL when Ruby driver used is too old).
class StatementInvalid < ActiveRecordError
end
@@ -78,7 +81,8 @@ class RecordNotUnique < WrappedDatabaseException
class InvalidForeignKey < WrappedDatabaseException
end
- # Raised when number of bind variables in statement given to <tt>:condition</tt> key (for example, when using +find+ method)
+ # Raised when number of bind variables in statement given to <tt>:condition</tt> key (for example,
+ # when using +find+ method)
# does not match number of expected variables.
#
# For example, in
@@ -165,4 +169,4 @@ def initialize(errors)
@errors = errors
end
end
-end
+end
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