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Undid previous change which violated the convention regarding output …

…(use "# =>") used in these guides. Corrected typo in previous correction. (Thanks for pointing this out, vijaydev.)
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commit 29bf193cadae8c0b01f565caed75eb285ba8c958 1 parent cde5294
Manuel Menezes de Sequeira MMSequeira authored
Showing with 13 additions and 13 deletions.
  1. +13 −13 railties/guides/source/active_record_querying.textile
26 railties/guides/source/active_record_querying.textile
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@@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ Using <tt>Model.find(primary_key)</tt>, you can retrieve the object correspondin
<ruby>
# Find the client with primary key (id) 10.
client = Client.find(10)
-=> #<Client id: 10, first_name: "Ryan">
+# => #<Client id: 10, first_name: "Ryan">
</ruby>
The SQL equivalent of the above is:
@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ h5. +first+
<ruby>
client = Client.first
-=> #<Client id: 1, first_name: "Lifo">
+# => #<Client id: 1, first_name: "Lifo">
</ruby>
The SQL equivalent of the above is:
@@ -121,7 +121,7 @@ h5. +last+
<ruby>
client = Client.last
-=> #<Client id: 221, first_name: "Russel">
+# => #<Client id: 221, first_name: "Russel">
</ruby>
The SQL equivalent of the above is:
@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ h5(#first_1). +first!+
<ruby>
client = Client.first!
-=> #<Client id: 1, first_name: "Lifo">
+# => #<Client id: 1, first_name: "Lifo">
</ruby>
The SQL equivalent of the above is:
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ h5(#last_1). +last!+
<ruby>
client = Client.last!
-=> #<Client id: 221, first_name: "Russel">
+# => #<Client id: 221, first_name: "Russel">
</ruby>
The SQL equivalent of the above is:
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ h5. Using Multiple Primary Keys
<ruby>
# Find the clients with primary keys 1 and 10.
client = Client.find([1, 10]) # Or even Client.find(1, 10)
-=> [#<Client id: 1, first_name: "Lifo">, #<Client id: 10, first_name: "Ryan">]
+# => [#<Client id: 1, first_name: "Lifo">, #<Client id: 10, first_name: "Ryan">]
</ruby>
The SQL equivalent of the above is:
@@ -252,7 +252,7 @@ Invoice.find_in_batches(:include => :invoice_lines) do |invoices|
end
</ruby>
-The above will each time yield to the supplied block an arrays of 1000 invoices (or the remaining invoices, if less than 1000).
+The above will each time yield to the supplied block an array of 1000 invoices (or the remaining invoices, if less than 1000).
NOTE: The +:include+ option allows you to name associations that should be loaded alongside with the models.
@@ -1032,7 +1032,7 @@ Suppose you want to find a client named 'Andy', and if there's none, create one
<ruby>
Client.where(:first_name => 'Andy').first_or_create(:locked => false)
-=> #<Client id: 1, first_name: "Andy", orders_count: 0, locked: false, created_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27", updated_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27">
+# => #<Client id: 1, first_name: "Andy", orders_count: 0, locked: false, created_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27", updated_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27">
</ruby>
The SQL generated by this method looks like this:
@@ -1070,7 +1070,7 @@ to your +Client+ model. If you try to create a new +Client+ without passing an +
<ruby>
Client.where(:first_name => 'Andy').first_or_create!(:locked => false)
-=> ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid: Validation failed: Orders count can't be blank
+# => ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid: Validation failed: Orders count can't be blank
</ruby>
h4. +first_or_initialize+
@@ -1079,13 +1079,13 @@ The +first_or_initialize+ method will work just like +first_or_create+ but it wi
<ruby>
nick = Client.where(:first_name => 'Nick').first_or_initialize(:locked => false)
-=> <Client id: nil, first_name: "Nick", orders_count: 0, locked: false, created_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27", updated_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27">
+# => <Client id: nil, first_name: "Nick", orders_count: 0, locked: false, created_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27", updated_at: "2011-08-30 06:09:27">
nick.persisted?
-=> false
+# => false
nick.new_record?
-=> true
+# => true
</ruby>
Because the object is not yet stored in the database, the SQL generated looks like this:
@@ -1098,7 +1098,7 @@ When you want to save it to the database, just call +save+:
<ruby>
nick.save
-=> true
+# => true
</ruby>
h3. Finding by SQL
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