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Typo fixes to various guides.

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1 parent ce2eadb commit 2b0d345497621f7fa42a53975aa66f21a614be73 @ffmike ffmike committed
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6 railties/doc/guides/source/association_basics.txt
@@ -416,9 +416,9 @@ This declaration needs to be backed up by the proper foreign key declaration on
class CreateOrders < ActiveRecord::Migration
def self.up
create_table :orders do |t|
- t.order_date :datetime
- t.order_number :string
- t.customer_id :integer
+ t.datetime :order_date
+ t.string :order_number
+ t.integer :customer_id
end
end
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22 railties/doc/guides/source/getting_started_with_rails.txt
@@ -154,6 +154,13 @@ And if you're using PostgreSQL for data storage, run this command:
$ rails blog -d postgresql
-------------------------------------------------------
+After you create the blog application, switch to its folder to continue work directly in that application:
+
+[source, shell]
+-------------------------------------------------------
+$ cd blog
+-------------------------------------------------------
+
In any case, Rails will create a folder in your working directory called +blog+. Open up that folder and explore its contents. Most of the work in this tutorial will happen in the +app/+ folder, but here's a basic rundown on the function of each folder that Rails creates in a new application by default:
[grid="all"]
@@ -239,6 +246,15 @@ development:
Change the username and password in the +development+ section as appropriate.
+==== Creating the Database
+
+Now that you have your database configured, it's time to have Rails create an empty database for you. You can do this by running a rake command:
+
+[source, shell]
+-------------------------------------------------------
+$ rake db:create
+-------------------------------------------------------
+
== Hello, Rails!
One of the traditional places to start with a new language is by getting some text up on screen quickly. To do that in Rails, you need to create at minimum a controller and a view. Fortunately, you can do that in a single command. Enter this command in your terminal:
@@ -370,7 +386,7 @@ end
If you were to translate that into words, it says something like: when this migration is run, create a table named +posts+ with two string columns (+name+ and +title+) and a text column (+content+), and generate timestamp fields to track record creation and updating. You can learn the detailed syntax for migrations in the link:../migrations.html[Rails Database Migrations] guide.
-At this point, you need to do two things: create the database and run the migration. You can use rake commands at the terminal for both of those tasks:
+At this point, you can use a rake command to run the migration:
[source, shell]
-------------------------------------------------------
@@ -378,7 +394,7 @@ $ rake db:create
$ rake db:migrate
-------------------------------------------------------
-NOTE: Because you're working in the development environment by default, both of these commands will apply to the database defined in the +development+ section of your +config/database.yml+ file.
+NOTE: Because you're working in the development environment by default, this command will apply to the database defined in the +development+ section of your +config/database.yml+ file.
=== Adding a Link
@@ -748,7 +764,7 @@ At this point, it’s worth looking at some of the tools that Rails provides to
=== Using Partials to Eliminate View Duplication
-As you saw earlier, the scaffold-generated views for the +new+ and +edit+ actions are largely identical. You can pull the shared code out into a +partial+ template. This requires editing the new and edit views, and adding a new template:
+As you saw earlier, the scaffold-generated views for the +new+ and +edit+ actions are largely identical. You can pull the shared code out into a +partial+ template. This requires editing the new and edit views, and adding a new template. The new +_form.html.erb+ template should be saved in the same +app/views/posts+ folder as the files from which it is being extracted:
+new.html.erb+:
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6 railties/doc/guides/source/routing_outside_in.txt
@@ -738,7 +738,7 @@ You do not need to explicitly use the +:controller+ and +:action+ symbols within
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
-map.connect 'photo/:id', :controller => 'photos', :action => 'show'
+map.connect 'photos/:id', :controller => 'photos', :action => 'show'
-------------------------------------------------------
With this route, an incoming URL of +/photos/12+ would be dispatched to the +show+ action within the +Photos+ controller.
@@ -747,7 +747,7 @@ You an also define other defaults in a route by supplying a hash for the +:defau
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
-map.connect 'photo/:id', :controller => 'photos', :action => 'show', :defaults => { :format => 'jpg' }
+map.connect 'photos/:id', :controller => 'photos', :action => 'show', :defaults => { :format => 'jpg' }
-------------------------------------------------------
With this route, an incoming URL of +photos/12+ would be dispatched to the +show+ action within the +Photos+ controller, and +params[:format]+ will be set to +jpg+.
@@ -886,7 +886,7 @@ For better readability, you can specify an already-created route in your call to
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
-map.index :controller => "pages", :action => "main"
+map.index 'index', :controller => "pages", :action => "main"
map.root :index
-------------------------------------------------------

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