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Capitalized Rails where appropriate.

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commit 3014f0f4c53da5b10294670976080b0036c016dd 1 parent 796fef6
@JosephPecoraro JosephPecoraro authored
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2  railties/guides/source/caching_with_rails.textile
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ Conditional GETs are a feature of the HTTP specification that provide a way for
They work by using the +HTTP_IF_NONE_MATCH+ and +HTTP_IF_MODIFIED_SINCE+ headers to pass back and forth both a unique content identifier and the timestamp of when the content was last changed. If the browser makes a request where the content identifier (etag) or last modified since timestamp matches the server’s version then the server only needs to send back an empty response with a not modified status.
-It is the server's (i.e. our) responsibility to look for a last modified timestamp and the if-none-match header and determine whether or not to send back the full response. With conditional-get support in rails this is a pretty easy task:
+It is the server's (i.e. our) responsibility to look for a last modified timestamp and the if-none-match header and determine whether or not to send back the full response. With conditional-get support in Rails this is a pretty easy task:
<ruby>
class ProductsController < ApplicationController
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6 railties/guides/source/form_helpers.textile
@@ -464,7 +464,7 @@ To leverage time zone support in Rails, you have to ask your users what time zon
There is also +time_zone_options_for_select+ helper for a more manual (therefore more customizable) way of doing this. Read the API documentation to learn about the possible arguments for these two methods.
-Rails _used_ to have a +country_select+ helper for choosing countries, but this has been extracted to the "country_select plugin":http://github.com/rails/country_select/tree/master. When using this, be aware that the exclusion or inclusion of certain names from the list can be somewhat controversial (and was the reason this functionality was extracted from rails).
+Rails _used_ to have a +country_select+ helper for choosing countries, but this has been extracted to the "country_select plugin":http://github.com/rails/country_select/tree/master. When using this, be aware that the exclusion or inclusion of certain names from the list can be somewhat controversial (and was the reason this functionality was extracted from Rails).
h3. Using Date and Time Form Helpers
@@ -718,7 +718,7 @@ This will result in a +params+ hash that looks like
{'person' => {'name' => 'Bob', 'address' => {'23' => {'city' => 'Paris'}, '45' => {'city' => 'London'}}}}
</ruby>
-Rails knows that all these inputs should be part of the person hash because you called +fields_for+ on the first form builder. By specifying an +:index+ option you're telling rails that instead of naming the inputs +person[address][city]+ it should insert that index surrounded by [] between the address and the city. If you pass an Active Record object as we did then Rails will call +to_param+ on it, which by default returns the database id. This is often useful as it is then easy to locate which Address record should be modified. You can pass numbers with some other significance, strings or even +nil+ (which will result in an array parameter being created).
+Rails knows that all these inputs should be part of the person hash because you called +fields_for+ on the first form builder. By specifying an +:index+ option you're telling Rails that instead of naming the inputs +person[address][city]+ it should insert that index surrounded by [] between the address and the city. If you pass an Active Record object as we did then Rails will call +to_param+ on it, which by default returns the database id. This is often useful as it is then easy to locate which Address record should be modified. You can pass numbers with some other significance, strings or even +nil+ (which will result in an array parameter being created).
To create more intricate nestings, you can specify the first part of the input name (+person[address]+ in the previous example) explicitly, for example
@@ -750,7 +750,7 @@ h3. Building Complex Forms
Many apps grow beyond simple forms editing a single object. For example when creating a Person you might want to allow the user to (on the same form) create multiple address records (home, work, etc.). When later editing that person the user should be able to add, remove or amend addresses as necessary. While this guide has shown you all the pieces necessary to handle this, Rails does not yet have a standard end-to-end way of accomplishing this, but many have come up with viable approaches. These include:
-* Ryan Bates' series of railscasts on "complex forms":http://railscasts.com/episodes/75
+* Ryan Bates' series of Railscasts on "complex forms":http://railscasts.com/episodes/75
* Handle Multiple Models in One Form from "Advanced Rails Recipes":http://media.pragprog.com/titles/fr_arr/multiple_models_one_form.pdf
* Eloy Duran's "nested_params":http://github.com/alloy/complex-form-examples/tree/alloy-nested_params plugin
* Lance Ivy's "nested_assignment":http://github.com/cainlevy/nested_assignment/tree/master plugin and "sample application":http://github.com/cainlevy/complex-form-examples/tree/cainlevy
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2  railties/guides/source/i18n.textile
@@ -413,7 +413,7 @@ So that would give you:
!images/i18n/demo_localized_pirate.png(rails i18n demo localized time to pirate)!
-TIP: Right now you might need to add some more date/time formats in order to make the I18n backend work as expected (at least for the 'pirate' locale). Of course, there's a great chance that somebody already did all the work by *translating Rails's defaults for your locale*. See the "rails-i18n repository at Github":http://github.com/svenfuchs/rails-i18n/tree/master/rails/locale for an archive of various locale files. When you put such file(s) in +config/locales/+ directory, they will automatically be ready for use.
+TIP: Right now you might need to add some more date/time formats in order to make the I18n backend work as expected (at least for the 'pirate' locale). Of course, there's a great chance that somebody already did all the work by *translating Rails' defaults for your locale*. See the "rails-i18n repository at Github":http://github.com/svenfuchs/rails-i18n/tree/master/rails/locale for an archive of various locale files. When you put such file(s) in +config/locales/+ directory, they will automatically be ready for use.
h4. Localized Views
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2  railties/guides/source/rails_on_rack.textile
@@ -229,7 +229,7 @@ h3. Rails Metal Applications
Rails Metal applications are minimal Rack applications specially designed for integrating with a typical Rails application. As Rails Metal Applications skip all of the Action Controller stack, serving a request has no overhead from the Rails framework itself. This is especially useful for infrequent cases where the performance of the full stack Rails framework is an issue.
-Ryan Bates' "railscast on Rails Metal":http://railscasts.com/episodes/150-rails-metal provides a nice walkthrough generating and using Rails Metal.
+Ryan Bates' "Railscast on Rails Metal":http://railscasts.com/episodes/150-rails-metal provides a nice walkthrough generating and using Rails Metal.
h4. Generating a Metal Application
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2  railties/guides/source/security.textile
@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ params[:user] #=> {:name => “ow3ned”, :admin => true}
So if you create a new user using mass-assignment, it may be too easy to become an administrator.
-Note that this vulnerability is not restricted to database columns. Any setter method, unless explicitly protected, is accessible via the <tt>attributes=</tt> method. In fact, this vulnerability is extended even further with the introduction of nested mass assignment (and nested object forms) in rails 2.3. The +accepts_nested_attributes_for+ declaration provides us the ability to extend mass assignment to model associations (+has_many+, +has_one+, +has_and_belongs_to_many+). For example:
+Note that this vulnerability is not restricted to database columns. Any setter method, unless explicitly protected, is accessible via the <tt>attributes=</tt> method. In fact, this vulnerability is extended even further with the introduction of nested mass assignment (and nested object forms) in Rails 2.3. The +accepts_nested_attributes_for+ declaration provides us the ability to extend mass assignment to model associations (+has_many+, +has_one+, +has_and_belongs_to_many+). For example:
<ruby>
class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
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