Permalink
Browse files

Merge pull request #1648 from dlee/acronyms

Inflector support for acronyms (Issue #1366)
  • Loading branch information...
fxn committed Jun 24, 2011
2 parents d446c79 + d38ca78 commit 370b380306e03afdf77f29005f33b90a174592f0
@@ -1,5 +1,4 @@
require 'active_support/inflector/methods'
-require 'active_support/inflector/inflections'
require 'active_support/inflector/transliterate'
# String inflections define new methods on the String class to transform names for different purposes.
@@ -20,10 +20,61 @@ def self.instance
@__instance__ ||= new
end
- attr_reader :plurals, :singulars, :uncountables, :humans
+ attr_reader :plurals, :singulars, :uncountables, :humans, :acronyms, :acronym_regex
def initialize
- @plurals, @singulars, @uncountables, @humans = [], [], [], []
+ @plurals, @singulars, @uncountables, @humans, @acronyms, @acronym_regex = [], [], [], [], {}, /(?=a)b/
+ end
+
+ # Specifies a new acronym. An acronym must be specified as it will appear in a camelized string. An underscore
+ # string that contains the acronym will retain the acronym when passed to `camelize`, `humanize`, or `titleize`.
+ # A camelized string that contains the acronym will maintain the acronym when titleized or humanized, and will
+ # convert the acronym into a non-delimited single lowercase word when passed to +underscore+.
+ #
+ # Examples:
+ # acronym 'HTML'
+ # titleize 'html' #=> 'HTML'
+ # camelize 'html' #=> 'HTML'
+ # underscore 'MyHTML' #=> 'my_html'
+ #
+ # The acronym, however, must occur as a delimited unit and not be part of another word for conversions to recognize it:
+ #
+ # acronym 'HTTP'
+ # camelize 'my_http_delimited' #=> 'MyHTTPDelimited'
+ # camelize 'https' #=> 'Https', not 'HTTPs'
+ # underscore 'HTTPS' #=> 'http_s', not 'https'
+ #
+ # acronym 'HTTPS'
+ # camelize 'https' #=> 'HTTPS'
+ # underscore 'HTTPS' #=> 'https'
+ #
+ # Note: Acronyms that are passed to `pluralize` will no longer be recognized, since the acronym will not occur as
+ # a delimited unit in the pluralized result. To work around this, you must specify the pluralized form as an
+ # acronym as well:
+ #
+ # acronym 'API'
+ # camelize(pluralize('api')) #=> 'Apis'
+ #
+ # acronym 'APIs'
+ # camelize(pluralize('api')) #=> 'APIs'
+ #
+ # `acronym` may be used to specify any word that contains an acronym or otherwise needs to maintain a non-standard
+ # capitalization. The only restriction is that the word must begin with a capital letter.
+ #
+ # Examples:
+ # acronym 'RESTful'
+ # underscore 'RESTful' #=> 'restful'
+ # underscore 'RESTfulController' #=> 'restful_controller'
+ # titleize 'RESTfulController' #=> 'RESTful Controller'
+ # camelize 'restful' #=> 'RESTful'
+ # camelize 'restful_controller' #=> 'RESTfulController'
+ #
+ # acronym 'McDonald'
+ # underscore 'McDonald' #=> 'mcdonald'
+ # camelize 'mcdonald' #=> 'McDonald'
+ def acronym(word)
+ @acronyms[word.downcase] = word
+ @acronym_regex = /#{@acronyms.values.join("|")}/
end
# Specifies a new pluralization rule and its replacement. The rule can either be a string or a regular expression.
@@ -117,95 +168,5 @@ def inflections
Inflections.instance
end
end
-
- # Returns the plural form of the word in the string.
- #
- # Examples:
- # "post".pluralize # => "posts"
- # "octopus".pluralize # => "octopi"
- # "sheep".pluralize # => "sheep"
- # "words".pluralize # => "words"
- # "CamelOctopus".pluralize # => "CamelOctopi"
- def pluralize(word)
- result = word.to_s.dup
-
- if word.empty? || inflections.uncountables.include?(result.downcase)
- result
- else
- inflections.plurals.each { |(rule, replacement)| break if result.gsub!(rule, replacement) }
- result
- end
- end
-
- # The reverse of +pluralize+, returns the singular form of a word in a string.
- #
- # Examples:
- # "posts".singularize # => "post"
- # "octopi".singularize # => "octopus"
- # "sheep".singularize # => "sheep"
- # "word".singularize # => "word"
- # "CamelOctopi".singularize # => "CamelOctopus"
- def singularize(word)
- result = word.to_s.dup
-
- if inflections.uncountables.any? { |inflection| result =~ /\b(#{inflection})\Z/i }
- result
- else
- inflections.singulars.each { |(rule, replacement)| break if result.gsub!(rule, replacement) }
- result
- end
- end
-
- # Capitalizes the first word and turns underscores into spaces and strips a
- # trailing "_id", if any. Like +titleize+, this is meant for creating pretty output.
- #
- # Examples:
- # "employee_salary" # => "Employee salary"
- # "author_id" # => "Author"
- def humanize(lower_case_and_underscored_word)
- result = lower_case_and_underscored_word.to_s.dup
-
- inflections.humans.each { |(rule, replacement)| break if result.gsub!(rule, replacement) }
- result.gsub(/_id$/, "").gsub(/_/, " ").capitalize
- end
-
- # Capitalizes all the words and replaces some characters in the string to create
- # a nicer looking title. +titleize+ is meant for creating pretty output. It is not
- # used in the Rails internals.
- #
- # +titleize+ is also aliased as as +titlecase+.
- #
- # Examples:
- # "man from the boondocks".titleize # => "Man From The Boondocks"
- # "x-men: the last stand".titleize # => "X Men: The Last Stand"
- def titleize(word)
- humanize(underscore(word)).gsub(/\b('?[a-z])/) { $1.capitalize }
- end
-
- # Create the name of a table like Rails does for models to table names. This method
- # uses the +pluralize+ method on the last word in the string.
- #
- # Examples
- # "RawScaledScorer".tableize # => "raw_scaled_scorers"
- # "egg_and_ham".tableize # => "egg_and_hams"
- # "fancyCategory".tableize # => "fancy_categories"
- def tableize(class_name)
- pluralize(underscore(class_name))
- end
-
- # Create a class name from a plural table name like Rails does for table names to models.
- # Note that this returns a string and not a Class. (To convert to an actual class
- # follow +classify+ with +constantize+.)
- #
- # Examples:
- # "egg_and_hams".classify # => "EggAndHam"
- # "posts".classify # => "Post"
- #
- # Singular names are not handled correctly:
- # "business".classify # => "Busines"
- def classify(table_name)
- # strip out any leading schema name
- camelize(singularize(table_name.to_s.sub(/.*\./, '')))
- end
end
end
@@ -1,3 +1,5 @@
+require 'active_support/inflector/inflections'
+
module ActiveSupport
# The Inflector transforms words from singular to plural, class names to table names, modularized class names to ones without,
# and class names to foreign keys. The default inflections for pluralization, singularization, and uncountable words are kept
@@ -10,6 +12,44 @@ module ActiveSupport
module Inflector
extend self
+ # Returns the plural form of the word in the string.
+ #
+ # Examples:
+ # "post".pluralize # => "posts"
+ # "octopus".pluralize # => "octopi"
+ # "sheep".pluralize # => "sheep"
+ # "words".pluralize # => "words"
+ # "CamelOctopus".pluralize # => "CamelOctopi"
+ def pluralize(word)
+ result = word.to_s.dup
+
+ if word.empty? || inflections.uncountables.include?(result.downcase)
+ result
+ else
+ inflections.plurals.each { |(rule, replacement)| break if result.gsub!(rule, replacement) }
+ result
+ end
+ end
+
+ # The reverse of +pluralize+, returns the singular form of a word in a string.
+ #
+ # Examples:
+ # "posts".singularize # => "post"
+ # "octopi".singularize # => "octopus"
+ # "sheep".singularize # => "sheep"
+ # "word".singularize # => "word"
+ # "CamelOctopi".singularize # => "CamelOctopus"
+ def singularize(word)
+ result = word.to_s.dup
+
+ if inflections.uncountables.any? { |inflection| result =~ /\b(#{inflection})\Z/i }
+ result
+ else
+ inflections.singulars.each { |(rule, replacement)| break if result.gsub!(rule, replacement) }
+ result
+ end
+ end
+
# By default, +camelize+ converts strings to UpperCamelCase. If the argument to +camelize+
# is set to <tt>:lower</tt> then +camelize+ produces lowerCamelCase.
#
@@ -25,12 +65,14 @@ module Inflector
# though there are cases where that does not hold:
#
# "SSLError".underscore.camelize # => "SslError"
- def camelize(lower_case_and_underscored_word, first_letter_in_uppercase = true)
- if first_letter_in_uppercase
- lower_case_and_underscored_word.to_s.gsub(/\/(.?)/) { "::#{$1.upcase}" }.gsub(/(?:^|_)(.)/) { $1.upcase }
+ def camelize(term, uppercase_first_letter = true)
+ string = term.to_s
+ if uppercase_first_letter
+ string = string.sub(/^[a-z\d]*/) { inflections.acronyms[$&] || $&.capitalize }
else
- lower_case_and_underscored_word.to_s[0].chr.downcase + camelize(lower_case_and_underscored_word)[1..-1]
+ string = string.sub(/^(?:#{inflections.acronym_regex}(?=\b|[A-Z_])|\w)/) { $&.downcase }
end
+ string.gsub(/(?:_|(\/))([a-z\d]*)/i) { "#{$1}#{inflections.acronyms[$2] || $2.capitalize}" }.gsub('/', '::')
end
# Makes an underscored, lowercase form from the expression in the string.
@@ -48,13 +90,66 @@ def camelize(lower_case_and_underscored_word, first_letter_in_uppercase = true)
def underscore(camel_cased_word)
word = camel_cased_word.to_s.dup
word.gsub!(/::/, '/')
- word.gsub!(/([A-Z]+)([A-Z][a-z])/,'\1_\2')
+ word.gsub!(/(?:([A-Za-z\d])|^)(#{inflections.acronym_regex})(?=\b|[^a-z])/) { "#{$1}#{$1 && '_'}#{$2.downcase}" }
+ word.gsub!(/([A-Z\d]+)([A-Z][a-z])/,'\1_\2')
word.gsub!(/([a-z\d])([A-Z])/,'\1_\2')
word.tr!("-", "_")
word.downcase!
word
end
+ # Capitalizes the first word and turns underscores into spaces and strips a
+ # trailing "_id", if any. Like +titleize+, this is meant for creating pretty output.
+ #
+ # Examples:
+ # "employee_salary" # => "Employee salary"
+ # "author_id" # => "Author"
+ def humanize(lower_case_and_underscored_word)
+ result = lower_case_and_underscored_word.to_s.dup
+ inflections.humans.each { |(rule, replacement)| break if result.gsub!(rule, replacement) }
+ result.gsub!(/_id$/, "")
+ result.gsub(/(_)?([a-z\d]*)/i) { "#{$1 && ' '}#{inflections.acronyms[$2] || $2.downcase}" }.gsub(/^\w/) { $&.upcase }
+ end
+
+ # Capitalizes all the words and replaces some characters in the string to create
+ # a nicer looking title. +titleize+ is meant for creating pretty output. It is not
+ # used in the Rails internals.
+ #
+ # +titleize+ is also aliased as as +titlecase+.
+ #
+ # Examples:
+ # "man from the boondocks".titleize # => "Man From The Boondocks"
+ # "x-men: the last stand".titleize # => "X Men: The Last Stand"
+ def titleize(word)
+ humanize(underscore(word)).gsub(/\b('?[a-z])/) { $1.capitalize }
+ end
+
+ # Create the name of a table like Rails does for models to table names. This method
+ # uses the +pluralize+ method on the last word in the string.
+ #
+ # Examples
+ # "RawScaledScorer".tableize # => "raw_scaled_scorers"
+ # "egg_and_ham".tableize # => "egg_and_hams"
+ # "fancyCategory".tableize # => "fancy_categories"
+ def tableize(class_name)
+ pluralize(underscore(class_name))
+ end
+
+ # Create a class name from a plural table name like Rails does for table names to models.
+ # Note that this returns a string and not a Class. (To convert to an actual class
+ # follow +classify+ with +constantize+.)
+ #
+ # Examples:
+ # "egg_and_hams".classify # => "EggAndHam"
+ # "posts".classify # => "Post"
+ #
+ # Singular names are not handled correctly:
+ # "business".classify # => "Busines"
+ def classify(table_name)
+ # strip out any leading schema name
+ camelize(singularize(table_name.to_s.sub(/.*\./, '')))
+ end
+
# Replaces underscores with dashes in the string.
#
# Example:
Oops, something went wrong.

0 comments on commit 370b380

Please sign in to comment.