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1.9 hash syntax changes

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commit 3c580182ff3c16d2247aabc85100bf8c6edb0f82 1 parent c04abba
Avner Cohen AvnerCohen authored
36 activerecord/lib/active_record/aggregations.rb
View
@@ -16,8 +16,8 @@ def clear_aggregation_cache #:nodoc:
# the database).
#
# class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
- # composed_of :balance, :class_name => "Money", :mapping => %w(balance amount)
- # composed_of :address, :mapping => [ %w(address_street street), %w(address_city city) ]
+ # composed_of :balance, class_name: "Money", mapping: %w(balance amount)
+ # composed_of :address, mapping: [ %w(address_street street), %w(address_city city) ]
# end
#
# The customer class now has the following methods to manipulate the value objects:
@@ -138,15 +138,15 @@ def clear_aggregation_cache #:nodoc:
#
# class NetworkResource < ActiveRecord::Base
# composed_of :cidr,
- # :class_name => 'NetAddr::CIDR',
- # :mapping => [ %w(network_address network), %w(cidr_range bits) ],
- # :allow_nil => true,
- # :constructor => Proc.new { |network_address, cidr_range| NetAddr::CIDR.create("#{network_address}/#{cidr_range}") },
- # :converter => Proc.new { |value| NetAddr::CIDR.create(value.is_a?(Array) ? value.join('/') : value) }
+ # class_name: 'NetAddr::CIDR',
+ # mapping: [ %w(network_address network), %w(cidr_range bits) ],
+ # allow_nil: true,
+ # constructor: Proc.new { |network_address, cidr_range| NetAddr::CIDR.create("#{network_address}/#{cidr_range}") },
+ # converter: Proc.new { |value| NetAddr::CIDR.create(value.is_a?(Array) ? value.join('/') : value) }
# end
#
# # This calls the :constructor
- # network_resource = NetworkResource.new(:network_address => '192.168.0.1', :cidr_range => 24)
+ # network_resource = NetworkResource.new(network_address: '192.168.0.1', cidr_range: 24)
#
# # These assignments will both use the :converter
# network_resource.cidr = [ '192.168.2.1', 8 ]
@@ -165,7 +165,7 @@ def clear_aggregation_cache #:nodoc:
# by specifying an instance of the value object in the conditions hash. The following example
# finds all customers with +balance_amount+ equal to 20 and +balance_currency+ equal to "USD":
#
- # Customer.where(:balance => Money.new(20, "USD")).all
+ # Customer.where(balance: Money.new(20, "USD")).all
#
module ClassMethods
# Adds reader and writer methods for manipulating a value object:
@@ -197,17 +197,17 @@ module ClassMethods
# can return nil to skip the assignment.
#
# Option examples:
- # composed_of :temperature, :mapping => %w(reading celsius)
- # composed_of :balance, :class_name => "Money", :mapping => %w(balance amount),
- # :converter => Proc.new { |balance| balance.to_money }
- # composed_of :address, :mapping => [ %w(address_street street), %w(address_city city) ]
+ # composed_of :temperature, mapping: %w(reading celsius)
+ # composed_of :balance, class_name: "Money", mapping: %w(balance amount),
+ # converter: Proc.new { |balance| balance.to_money }
+ # composed_of :address, mapping: [ %w(address_street street), %w(address_city city) ]
# composed_of :gps_location
- # composed_of :gps_location, :allow_nil => true
+ # composed_of :gps_location, allow_nil: true
# composed_of :ip_address,
- # :class_name => 'IPAddr',
- # :mapping => %w(ip to_i),
- # :constructor => Proc.new { |ip| IPAddr.new(ip, Socket::AF_INET) },
- # :converter => Proc.new { |ip| ip.is_a?(Integer) ? IPAddr.new(ip, Socket::AF_INET) : IPAddr.new(ip.to_s) }
+ # class_name: 'IPAddr',
+ # mapping: %w(ip to_i),
+ # constructor: Proc.new { |ip| IPAddr.new(ip, Socket::AF_INET) },
+ # converter: Proc.new { |ip| ip.is_a?(Integer) ? IPAddr.new(ip, Socket::AF_INET) : IPAddr.new(ip.to_s) }
#
def composed_of(part_id, options = {})
options.assert_valid_keys(:class_name, :mapping, :allow_nil, :constructor, :converter)
106 activerecord/lib/active_record/associations.rb
View
@@ -305,11 +305,11 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# end
# class Programmer < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :assignments
- # has_many :projects, :through => :assignments
+ # has_many :projects, through: :assignments
# end
# class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :assignments
- # has_many :programmers, :through => :assignments
+ # has_many :programmers, through: :assignments
# end
#
# For the second way, use +has_and_belongs_to_many+ in both models. This requires a join table
@@ -426,7 +426,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# object from an association collection.
#
# class Project
- # has_and_belongs_to_many :developers, :after_add => :evaluate_velocity
+ # has_and_belongs_to_many :developers, after_add: :evaluate_velocity
#
# def evaluate_velocity(developer)
# ...
@@ -437,7 +437,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# class Project
# has_and_belongs_to_many :developers,
- # :after_add => [:evaluate_velocity, Proc.new { |p, d| p.shipping_date = Time.now}]
+ # after_add: [:evaluate_velocity, Proc.new { |p, d| p.shipping_date = Time.now}]
# end
#
# Possible callbacks are: +before_add+, +after_add+, +before_remove+ and +after_remove+.
@@ -507,7 +507,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# class Author < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :authorships
- # has_many :books, :through => :authorships
+ # has_many :books, through: :authorships
# end
#
# class Authorship < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -523,7 +523,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# class Firm < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :clients
- # has_many :invoices, :through => :clients
+ # has_many :invoices, through: :clients
# end
#
# class Client < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -543,7 +543,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# class Group < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :users
- # has_many :avatars, :through => :users
+ # has_many :avatars, through: :users
# end
#
# class User < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -571,7 +571,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# works correctly (where <tt>tags</tt> is a +has_many+ <tt>:through</tt> association):
#
# @post = Post.first
- # @tag = @post.tags.build :name => "ruby"
+ # @tag = @post.tags.build name: "ruby"
# @tag.save
#
# The last line ought to save the through record (a <tt>Taggable</tt>). This will only work if the
@@ -579,7 +579,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# class Taggable < ActiveRecord::Base
# belongs_to :post
- # belongs_to :tag, :inverse_of => :taggings
+ # belongs_to :tag, inverse_of: :taggings
# end
#
# == Nested Associations
@@ -589,8 +589,8 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# class Author < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :posts
- # has_many :comments, :through => :posts
- # has_many :commenters, :through => :comments
+ # has_many :comments, through: :posts
+ # has_many :commenters, through: :comments
# end
#
# class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -608,12 +608,12 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# class Author < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :posts
- # has_many :commenters, :through => :posts
+ # has_many :commenters, through: :posts
# end
#
# class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
# has_many :comments
- # has_many :commenters, :through => :comments
+ # has_many :commenters, through: :comments
# end
#
# class Comment < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -632,11 +632,11 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# must adhere to.
#
# class Asset < ActiveRecord::Base
- # belongs_to :attachable, :polymorphic => true
+ # belongs_to :attachable, polymorphic: true
# end
#
# class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
- # has_many :assets, :as => :attachable # The :as option specifies the polymorphic interface to use.
+ # has_many :assets, as: :attachable # The :as option specifies the polymorphic interface to use.
# end
#
# @asset.attachable = @post
@@ -653,7 +653,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# column in the posts table.
#
# class Asset < ActiveRecord::Base
- # belongs_to :attachable, :polymorphic => true
+ # belongs_to :attachable, polymorphic: true
#
# def attachable_type=(sType)
# super(sType.to_s.classify.constantize.base_class.to_s)
@@ -661,8 +661,8 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# end
#
# class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
- # # because we store "Post" in attachable_type now :dependent => :destroy will work
- # has_many :assets, :as => :attachable, :dependent => :destroy
+ # # because we store "Post" in attachable_type now dependent: :destroy will work
+ # has_many :assets, as: :attachable, dependent: :destroy
# end
#
# class GuestPost < Post
@@ -724,7 +724,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# To include a deep hierarchy of associations, use a hash:
#
- # Post.includes(:author, {:comments => {:author => :gravatar}}).each do |post|
+ # Post.includes(:author, {comments: {author: :gravatar}}).each do |post|
#
# That'll grab not only all the comments but all their authors and gravatar pictures.
# You can mix and match symbols, arrays and hashes in any combination to describe the
@@ -749,13 +749,13 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# In the above example posts with no approved comments are not returned at all, because
# the conditions apply to the SQL statement as a whole and not just to the association.
# You must disambiguate column references for this fallback to happen, for example
- # <tt>:order => "author.name DESC"</tt> will work but <tt>:order => "name DESC"</tt> will not.
+ # <tt>order: "author.name DESC"</tt> will work but <tt>order: "name DESC"</tt> will not.
#
# If you do want eager load only some members of an association it is usually more natural
# to include an association which has conditions defined on it:
#
# class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
- # has_many :approved_comments, -> { where approved: true }, :class_name => 'Comment'
+ # has_many :approved_comments, -> { where approved: true }, class_name: 'Comment'
# end
#
# Post.includes(:approved_comments)
@@ -767,7 +767,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# returning all the associated objects:
#
# class Picture < ActiveRecord::Base
- # has_many :most_recent_comments, -> { order('id DESC').limit(10) }, :class_name => 'Comment'
+ # has_many :most_recent_comments, -> { order('id DESC').limit(10) }, class_name: 'Comment'
# end
#
# Picture.includes(:most_recent_comments).first.most_recent_comments # => returns all associated comments.
@@ -775,7 +775,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# Eager loading is supported with polymorphic associations.
#
# class Address < ActiveRecord::Base
- # belongs_to :addressable, :polymorphic => true
+ # belongs_to :addressable, polymorphic: true
# end
#
# A call that tries to eager load the addressable model
@@ -809,10 +809,10 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# TreeMixin.joins(:children)
# # => SELECT ... FROM mixins INNER JOIN mixins childrens_mixins ...
- # TreeMixin.joins(:children => :parent)
+ # TreeMixin.joins(children: :parent)
# # => SELECT ... FROM mixins INNER JOIN mixins childrens_mixins ...
# INNER JOIN parents_mixins ...
- # TreeMixin.joins(:children => {:parent => :children})
+ # TreeMixin.joins(children: {parent: :children})
# # => SELECT ... FROM mixins INNER JOIN mixins childrens_mixins ...
# INNER JOIN parents_mixins ...
# INNER JOIN mixins childrens_mixins_2
@@ -821,10 +821,10 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# Post.joins(:categories)
# # => SELECT ... FROM posts INNER JOIN categories_posts ... INNER JOIN categories ...
- # Post.joins(:categories => :posts)
+ # Post.joins(categories: :posts)
# # => SELECT ... FROM posts INNER JOIN categories_posts ... INNER JOIN categories ...
# INNER JOIN categories_posts posts_categories_join INNER JOIN posts posts_categories
- # Post.joins(:categories => {:posts => :categories})
+ # Post.joins(categories: {posts: :categories})
# # => SELECT ... FROM posts INNER JOIN categories_posts ... INNER JOIN categories ...
# INNER JOIN categories_posts posts_categories_join INNER JOIN posts posts_categories
# INNER JOIN categories_posts categories_posts_join INNER JOIN categories categories_posts_2
@@ -868,7 +868,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
#
# module Billing
# class Account < ActiveRecord::Base
- # belongs_to :firm, :class_name => "MyApplication::Business::Firm"
+ # belongs_to :firm, class_name: "MyApplication::Business::Firm"
# end
# end
# end
@@ -910,16 +910,16 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# example, if we changed our model definitions to:
#
# class Dungeon < ActiveRecord::Base
- # has_many :traps, :inverse_of => :dungeon
- # has_one :evil_wizard, :inverse_of => :dungeon
+ # has_many :traps, inverse_of: :dungeon
+ # has_one :evil_wizard, inverse_of: :dungeon
# end
#
# class Trap < ActiveRecord::Base
- # belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :traps
+ # belongs_to :dungeon, inverse_of: :traps
# end
#
# class EvilWizard < ActiveRecord::Base
- # belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :evil_wizard
+ # belongs_to :dungeon, inverse_of: :evil_wizard
# end
#
# Then, from our code snippet above, +d+ and <tt>t.dungeon</tt> are actually the same
@@ -942,7 +942,7 @@ def association_instance_set(name, association)
# For example:
#
# class Author
- # has_many :posts, :dependent => :destroy
+ # has_many :posts, dependent: :destroy
# end
# Author.find(1).destroy # => Will destroy all of the author's posts, too
#
@@ -1026,12 +1026,12 @@ module ClassMethods
# parent object.
# [collection.delete(object, ...)]
# Removes one or more objects from the collection by setting their foreign keys to +NULL+.
- # Objects will be in addition destroyed if they're associated with <tt>:dependent => :destroy</tt>,
- # and deleted if they're associated with <tt>:dependent => :delete_all</tt>.
+ # Objects will be in addition destroyed if they're associated with <tt>dependent: :destroy</tt>,
+ # and deleted if they're associated with <tt>dependent: :delete_all</tt>.
#
# If the <tt>:through</tt> option is used, then the join records are deleted (rather than
- # nullified) by default, but you can specify <tt>:dependent => :destroy</tt> or
- # <tt>:dependent => :nullify</tt> to override this.
+ # nullified) by default, but you can specify <tt>dependent: :destroy</tt> or
+ # <tt>dependent: :nullify</tt> to override this.
# [collection.destroy(object, ...)]
# Removes one or more objects from the collection by running <tt>destroy</tt> on
# each record, regardless of any dependent option, ensuring callbacks are run.
@@ -1049,8 +1049,8 @@ module ClassMethods
# method loads the models and calls <tt>collection=</tt>. See above.
# [collection.clear]
# Removes every object from the collection. This destroys the associated objects if they
- # are associated with <tt>:dependent => :destroy</tt>, deletes them directly from the
- # database if <tt>:dependent => :delete_all</tt>, otherwise sets their foreign keys to +NULL+.
+ # are associated with <tt>dependent: :destroy</tt>, deletes them directly from the
+ # database if <tt>dependent: :delete_all</tt>, otherwise sets their foreign keys to +NULL+.
# If the <tt>:through</tt> option is true no destroy callbacks are invoked on the join models.
# Join models are directly deleted.
# [collection.empty?]
@@ -1078,7 +1078,7 @@ module ClassMethods
# === Example
#
# Example: A Firm class declares <tt>has_many :clients</tt>, which will add:
- # * <tt>Firm#clients</tt> (similar to <tt>Clients.all :conditions => ["firm_id = ?", id]</tt>)
+ # * <tt>Firm#clients</tt> (similar to <tt>Clients.all conditions: ["firm_id = ?", id]</tt>)
# * <tt>Firm#clients<<</tt>
# * <tt>Firm#clients.delete</tt>
# * <tt>Firm#clients.destroy</tt>
@@ -1088,8 +1088,8 @@ module ClassMethods
# * <tt>Firm#clients.clear</tt>
# * <tt>Firm#clients.empty?</tt> (similar to <tt>firm.clients.size == 0</tt>)
# * <tt>Firm#clients.size</tt> (similar to <tt>Client.count "firm_id = #{id}"</tt>)
- # * <tt>Firm#clients.find</tt> (similar to <tt>Client.find(id, :conditions => "firm_id = #{id}")</tt>)
- # * <tt>Firm#clients.exists?(:name => 'ACME')</tt> (similar to <tt>Client.exists?(:name => 'ACME', :firm_id => firm.id)</tt>)
+ # * <tt>Firm#clients.find</tt> (similar to <tt>Client.find(id, conditions: "firm_id = #{id}")</tt>)
+ # * <tt>Firm#clients.exists?(name: 'ACME')</tt> (similar to <tt>Client.exists?(name: 'ACME', firm_id: firm.id)</tt>)
# * <tt>Firm#clients.build</tt> (similar to <tt>Client.new("firm_id" => id)</tt>)
# * <tt>Firm#clients.create</tt> (similar to <tt>c = Client.new("firm_id" => id); c.save; c</tt>)
# The declaration can also include an options hash to specialize the behavior of the association.
@@ -1143,7 +1143,7 @@ module ClassMethods
# [:source]
# Specifies the source association name used by <tt>has_many :through</tt> queries.
# Only use it if the name cannot be inferred from the association.
- # <tt>has_many :subscribers, :through => :subscriptions</tt> will look for either <tt>:subscribers</tt> or
+ # <tt>has_many :subscribers, through: :subscriptions</tt> will look for either <tt>:subscribers</tt> or
# <tt>:subscriber</tt> on Subscription, unless a <tt>:source</tt> is given.
# [:source_type]
# Specifies type of the source association used by <tt>has_many :through</tt> queries where the source
@@ -1207,7 +1207,7 @@ def has_many(name, scope = nil, options = {}, &extension)
# === Example
#
# An Account class declares <tt>has_one :beneficiary</tt>, which will add:
- # * <tt>Account#beneficiary</tt> (similar to <tt>Beneficiary.first(:conditions => "account_id = #{id}")</tt>)
+ # * <tt>Account#beneficiary</tt> (similar to <tt>Beneficiary.first(conditions: "account_id = #{id}")</tt>)
# * <tt>Account#beneficiary=(beneficiary)</tt> (similar to <tt>beneficiary.account_id = account.id; beneficiary.save</tt>)
# * <tt>Account#build_beneficiary</tt> (similar to <tt>Beneficiary.new("account_id" => id)</tt>)
# * <tt>Account#create_beneficiary</tt> (similar to <tt>b = Beneficiary.new("account_id" => id); b.save; b</tt>)
@@ -1247,7 +1247,7 @@ def has_many(name, scope = nil, options = {}, &extension)
# [:source]
# Specifies the source association name used by <tt>has_one :through</tt> queries.
# Only use it if the name cannot be inferred from the association.
- # <tt>has_one :favorite, :through => :favorites</tt> will look for a
+ # <tt>has_one :favorite, through: :favorites</tt> will look for a
# <tt>:favorite</tt> on Favorite, unless a <tt>:source</tt> is given.
# [:source_type]
# Specifies type of the source association used by <tt>has_one :through</tt> queries where the source
@@ -1267,11 +1267,11 @@ def has_many(name, scope = nil, options = {}, &extension)
# See ActiveRecord::Associations::ClassMethods's overview on Bi-directional associations for more detail.
#
# Option examples:
- # has_one :credit_card, :dependent => :destroy # destroys the associated credit card
- # has_one :credit_card, :dependent => :nullify # updates the associated records foreign
+ # has_one :credit_card, dependent: :destroy # destroys the associated credit card
+ # has_one :credit_card, dependent: :nullify # updates the associated records foreign
# # key value to NULL rather than destroying it
- # has_one :last_comment, -> { order 'posted_on' }, :class_name => "Comment"
- # has_one :project_manager, -> { where role: 'project_manager' }, :class_name => "Person"
+ # has_one :last_comment, -> { order 'posted_on' }, class_name: "Comment"
+ # has_one :project_manager, -> { where role: 'project_manager' }, class_name: "Person"
# has_one :attachment, as: :attachable
# has_one :boss, readonly: :true
# has_one :club, through: :membership
@@ -1326,12 +1326,12 @@ def has_one(name, scope = nil, options = {})
# Specify the foreign key used for the association. By default this is guessed to be the name
# of the association with an "_id" suffix. So a class that defines a <tt>belongs_to :person</tt>
# association will use "person_id" as the default <tt>:foreign_key</tt>. Similarly,
- # <tt>belongs_to :favorite_person, :class_name => "Person"</tt> will use a foreign key
+ # <tt>belongs_to :favorite_person, class_name: "Person"</tt> will use a foreign key
# of "favorite_person_id".
# [:foreign_type]
# Specify the column used to store the associated object's type, if this is a polymorphic
# association. By default this is guessed to be the name of the association with a "_type"
- # suffix. So a class that defines a <tt>belongs_to :taggable, :polymorphic => true</tt>
+ # suffix. So a class that defines a <tt>belongs_to :taggable, polymorphic: true</tt>
# association will use "taggable_type" as the default <tt>:foreign_type</tt>.
# [:primary_key]
# Specify the method that returns the primary key of associated object used for the association.
@@ -1351,7 +1351,7 @@ def has_one(name, scope = nil, options = {})
# <tt>#{table_name}_count</tt> is created on the associate class (such that Post.comments_count will
# return the count cached, see note below). You can also specify a custom counter
# cache column by providing a column name instead of a +true+/+false+ value to this
- # option (e.g., <tt>:counter_cache => :my_custom_counter</tt>.)
+ # option (e.g., <tt>counter_cache: :my_custom_counter</tt>.)
# Note: Specifying a counter cache will add it to that model's list of readonly attributes
# using +attr_readonly+.
# [:polymorphic]
@@ -1409,7 +1409,7 @@ def belongs_to(name, scope = nil, options = {})
#
# class CreateDevelopersProjectsJoinTable < ActiveRecord::Migration
# def change
- # create_table :developers_projects, :id => false do |t|
+ # create_table :developers_projects, id: false do |t|
# t.integer :developer_id
# t.integer :project_id
# end
22 activerecord/lib/active_record/autosave_association.rb
View
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ module ActiveRecord
# Note that it also means that associations marked for destruction won't
# be destroyed directly. They will however still be marked for destruction.
#
- # Note that <tt>:autosave => false</tt> is not same as not declaring <tt>:autosave</tt>.
+ # Note that <tt>autosave: false</tt> is not same as not declaring <tt>:autosave</tt>.
# When the <tt>:autosave</tt> option is not present new associations are saved.
#
# == Validation
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ module ActiveRecord
# === One-to-one Example
#
# class Post
- # has_one :author, :autosave => true
+ # has_one :author, autosave: true
# end
#
# Saving changes to the parent and its associated model can now be performed
@@ -81,27 +81,27 @@ module ActiveRecord
# has_many :comments # :autosave option is not declared
# end
#
- # post = Post.new(:title => 'ruby rocks')
- # post.comments.build(:body => 'hello world')
+ # post = Post.new(title: 'ruby rocks')
+ # post.comments.build(body: 'hello world')
# post.save # => saves both post and comment
#
- # post = Post.create(:title => 'ruby rocks')
- # post.comments.build(:body => 'hello world')
+ # post = Post.create(title: 'ruby rocks')
+ # post.comments.build(body: 'hello world')
# post.save # => saves both post and comment
#
- # post = Post.create(:title => 'ruby rocks')
- # post.comments.create(:body => 'hello world')
+ # post = Post.create(title: 'ruby rocks')
+ # post.comments.create(body: 'hello world')
# post.save # => saves both post and comment
#
# When <tt>:autosave</tt> is true all children are saved, no matter whether they
# are new records or not:
#
# class Post
- # has_many :comments, :autosave => true
+ # has_many :comments, autosave: true
# end
#
- # post = Post.create(:title => 'ruby rocks')
- # post.comments.create(:body => 'hello world')
+ # post = Post.create(title: 'ruby rocks')
+ # post.comments.create(body: 'hello world')
# post.comments[0].body = 'hi everyone'
# post.save # => saves both post and comment, with 'hi everyone' as body
#
38 activerecord/lib/active_record/base.rb
View
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# method is especially useful when you're receiving the data from somewhere else, like an
# HTTP request. It works like this:
#
- # user = User.new(:name => "David", :occupation => "Code Artist")
+ # user = User.new(name: "David", occupation: "Code Artist")
# user.name # => "David"
#
# You can also use block initialization:
@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# end
#
# def self.authenticate_safely_simply(user_name, password)
- # where(:user_name => user_name, :password => password).first
+ # where(user_name: user_name, password: password).first
# end
# end
#
@@ -87,27 +87,27 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
#
# Company.where(
# "id = :id AND name = :name AND division = :division AND created_at > :accounting_date",
- # { :id => 3, :name => "37signals", :division => "First", :accounting_date => '2005-01-01' }
+ # { id: 3, name: "37signals", division: "First", accounting_date: '2005-01-01' }
# ).first
#
# Similarly, a simple hash without a statement will generate conditions based on equality with the SQL AND
# operator. For instance:
#
- # Student.where(:first_name => "Harvey", :status => 1)
+ # Student.where(first_name: "Harvey", status: 1)
# Student.where(params[:student])
#
# A range may be used in the hash to use the SQL BETWEEN operator:
#
- # Student.where(:grade => 9..12)
+ # Student.where(grade: 9..12)
#
# An array may be used in the hash to use the SQL IN operator:
#
- # Student.where(:grade => [9,11,12])
+ # Student.where(grade: [9,11,12])
#
# When joining tables, nested hashes or keys written in the form 'table_name.column_name'
# can be used to qualify the table name of a particular condition. For instance:
#
- # Student.joins(:schools).where(:schools => { :category => 'public' })
+ # Student.joins(:schools).where(schools: { category: 'public' })
# Student.joins(:schools).where('schools.category' => 'public' )
#
# == Overwriting default accessors
@@ -141,10 +141,10 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# For example, an Active Record User with the <tt>name</tt> attribute has a <tt>name?</tt> method that you can call
# to determine whether the user has a name:
#
- # user = User.new(:name => "David")
+ # user = User.new(name: "David")
# user.name? # => true
#
- # anonymous = User.new(:name => "")
+ # anonymous = User.new(name: "")
# anonymous.name? # => false
#
# == Accessing attributes before they have been typecasted
@@ -165,8 +165,8 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# to <tt>find_by_</tt>, <tt>find_last_by_</tt>, or <tt>find_all_by_</tt> and thus produces finders
# like <tt>Person.find_by_user_name</tt>, <tt>Person.find_all_by_last_name</tt>, and
# <tt>Payment.find_by_transaction_id</tt>. Instead of writing
- # <tt>Person.where(:user_name => user_name).first</tt>, you just do <tt>Person.find_by_user_name(user_name)</tt>.
- # And instead of writing <tt>Person.where(:last_name => last_name).all</tt>, you just do
+ # <tt>Person.where(user_name: user_name).first</tt>, you just do <tt>Person.find_by_user_name(user_name)</tt>.
+ # And instead of writing <tt>Person.where(last_name: last_name).all</tt>, you just do
# <tt>Person.find_all_by_last_name(last_name)</tt>.
#
# It's possible to add an exclamation point (!) on the end of the dynamic finders to get them to raise an
@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
#
# It's also possible to use multiple attributes in the same find by separating them with "_and_".
#
- # Person.where(:user_name => user_name, :password => password).first
+ # Person.where(user_name: user_name, password: password).first
# Person.find_by_user_name_and_password(user_name, password) # with dynamic finder
#
# It's even possible to call these dynamic finder methods on relations and named scopes.
@@ -189,13 +189,13 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# unless they are given in a block.
#
# # No 'Summer' tag exists
- # Tag.find_or_create_by_name("Summer") # equal to Tag.create(:name => "Summer")
+ # Tag.find_or_create_by_name("Summer") # equal to Tag.create(name: "Summer")
#
# # Now the 'Summer' tag does exist
# Tag.find_or_create_by_name("Summer") # equal to Tag.find_by_name("Summer")
#
# # Now 'Bob' exist and is an 'admin'
- # User.find_or_create_by_name('Bob', :age => 40) { |u| u.admin = true }
+ # User.find_or_create_by_name('Bob', age: 40) { |u| u.admin = true }
#
# Adding an exclamation point (!) on to the end of <tt>find_or_create_by_</tt> will
# raise an <tt>ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid</tt> error if the new record is invalid.
@@ -210,7 +210,7 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# To find by a subset of the attributes to be used for instantiating a new object, pass a hash instead of
# a list of parameters.
#
- # Tag.find_or_create_by_name(:name => "rails", :creator => current_user)
+ # Tag.find_or_create_by_name(name: "rails", creator: current_user)
#
# That will either find an existing tag named "rails", or create a new one while setting the
# user that created it.
@@ -232,7 +232,7 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# serialize :preferences
# end
#
- # user = User.create(:preferences => { "background" => "black", "display" => large })
+ # user = User.create(preferences: { "background" => "black", "display" => large })
# User.find(user.id).preferences # => { "background" => "black", "display" => large }
#
# You can also specify a class option as the second parameter that'll raise an exception
@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# serialize :preferences, Hash
# end
#
- # user = User.create(:preferences => %w( one two three ))
+ # user = User.create(preferences: %w( one two three ))
# User.find(user.id).preferences # raises SerializationTypeMismatch
#
# When you specify a class option, the default value for that attribute will be a new
@@ -267,9 +267,9 @@ module ActiveRecord #:nodoc:
# class Client < Company; end
# class PriorityClient < Client; end
#
- # When you do <tt>Firm.create(:name => "37signals")</tt>, this record will be saved in
+ # When you do <tt>Firm.create(name: "37signals")</tt>, this record will be saved in
# the companies table with type = "Firm". You can then fetch this row again using
- # <tt>Company.where(:name => '37signals').first</tt> and it will return a Firm object.
+ # <tt>Company.where(name: '37signals').first</tt> and it will return a Firm object.
#
# If you don't have a type column defined in your table, single-table inheritance won't
# be triggered. In that case, it'll work just like normal subclasses with no special magic
2  activerecord/lib/active_record/callbacks.rb
View
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ module ActiveRecord
# class CreditCard < ActiveRecord::Base
# # Strip everything but digits, so the user can specify "555 234 34" or
# # "5552-3434" and both will mean "55523434"
- # before_validation(:on => :create) do
+ # before_validation(on: :create) do
# self.number = number.gsub(/[^0-9]/, "") if attribute_present?("number")
# end
# end
16 activerecord/lib/active_record/connection_handling.rb
View
@@ -5,18 +5,18 @@ module ConnectionHandling
# example for regular databases (MySQL, Postgresql, etc):
#
# ActiveRecord::Base.establish_connection(
- # :adapter => "mysql",
- # :host => "localhost",
- # :username => "myuser",
- # :password => "mypass",
- # :database => "somedatabase"
+ # adapter: "mysql",
+ # host: "localhost",
+ # username: "myuser",
+ # password: "mypass",
+ # database: "somedatabase"
# )
#
# Example for SQLite database:
#
# ActiveRecord::Base.establish_connection(
- # :adapter => "sqlite",
- # :database => "path/to/dbfile"
+ # adapter: "sqlite",
+ # database: "path/to/dbfile"
# )
#
# Also accepts keys as strings (for parsing from YAML for example):
@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ def connection_id=(connection_id)
# Returns the configuration of the associated connection as a hash:
#
# ActiveRecord::Base.connection_config
- # # => {:pool=>5, :timeout=>5000, :database=>"db/development.sqlite3", :adapter=>"sqlite3"}
+ # # => {pool: 5, timeout: 5000, database: "db/development.sqlite3", adapter: "sqlite3"}
#
# Please use only for reading.
def connection_config
2  activerecord/lib/active_record/core.rb
View
@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ def relation #:nodoc:
#
# ==== Example:
# # Instantiates a single new object
- # User.new(:first_name => 'Jamie')
+ # User.new(first_name: 'Jamie')
def initialize(attributes = nil)
defaults = self.class.column_defaults.dup
defaults.each { |k, v| defaults[k] = v.dup if v.duplicable? }
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