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Merge branch 'master' of git://github.com/lifo/docrails

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commit 3e24e9ebc22f96f9124d3a5d1c83b93c1bea937d 2 parents a000fc5 + 4c323bc
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Showing with 119 additions and 99 deletions.
  1. +1 −1  actionmailer/README.rdoc
  2. +2 −2 actionpack/README.rdoc
  3. +2 −2 actionpack/lib/action_controller/base.rb
  4. +5 −1 actionpack/lib/action_controller/metal.rb
  5. +1 −1  actionpack/lib/action_controller/metal/http_authentication.rb
  6. +3 −0  actionpack/lib/action_controller/metal/mime_responds.rb
  7. +8 −8 actionpack/lib/action_dispatch/testing/integration.rb
  8. +5 −5 actionpack/lib/action_view/base.rb
  9. +1 −1  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/atom_feed_helper.rb
  10. +1 −1  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/capture_helper.rb
  11. +1 −1  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/prototype_helper.rb
  12. +1 −1  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/url_helper.rb
  13. +1 −1  actionpack/lib/action_view/template/handlers/erb.rb
  14. +10 −11 activemodel/lib/active_model/errors.rb
  15. +18 −0 activerecord/lib/active_record/callbacks.rb
  16. +3 −3 activerecord/lib/active_record/fixtures.rb
  17. +23 −0 activerecord/lib/active_record/named_scope.rb
  18. +1 −1  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/string/output_safety.rb
  19. +3 −14 railties/guides/source/action_controller_overview.textile
  20. +1 −1  railties/guides/source/action_view_overview.textile
  21. +1 −1  railties/guides/source/api_documentation_guidelines.textile
  22. +1 −1  railties/guides/source/command_line.textile
  23. +1 −1  railties/guides/source/configuring.textile
  24. +5 −22 railties/guides/source/getting_started.textile
  25. +2 −3 railties/guides/source/initialization.textile
  26. +1 −1  railties/guides/source/layout.html.erb
  27. +10 −9 railties/guides/source/ruby_on_rails_guides_guidelines.textile
  28. +5 −4 railties/guides/source/testing.textile
  29. +2 −2 railties/lib/rails/source_annotation_extractor.rb
View
2  actionmailer/README.rdoc
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ This can be as simple as:
end
The body of the email is created by using an Action View template (regular
-ERb) that has the instance variables that are declared in the mailer action.
+ERB) that has the instance variables that are declared in the mailer action.
So the corresponding body template for the method above could look like this:
View
4 actionpack/README.rdoc
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ It consists of several modules:
* Action View, which handles view template lookup and rendering, and provides
view helpers that assist when building HTML forms, Atom feeds and more.
- Template formats that Action View handles are ERb (embedded Ruby, typically
+ Template formats that Action View handles are ERB (embedded Ruby, typically
used to inline short Ruby snippets inside HTML), XML Builder and RJS
(dynamically generated JavaScript from Ruby code).
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ A short rundown of some of the major features:
{Learn more}[link:classes/ActionController/Base.html]
-* ERb templates (static content mixed with dynamic output from ruby)
+* ERB templates (static content mixed with dynamic output from ruby)
<% for post in @posts %>
Title: <%= post.title %>
View
4 actionpack/lib/action_controller/base.rb
@@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ module ActionController
# == Renders
#
# Action Controller sends content to the user by using one of five rendering methods. The most versatile and common is the rendering
- # of a template. Included in the Action Pack is the Action View, which enables rendering of ERb templates. It's automatically configured.
+ # of a template. Included in the Action Pack is the Action View, which enables rendering of ERB templates. It's automatically configured.
# The controller passes objects to the view by assigning instance variables:
#
# def show
@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ module ActionController
# end
# end
#
- # Read more about writing ERb and Builder templates in ActionView::Base.
+ # Read more about writing ERB and Builder templates in ActionView::Base.
#
# == Redirects
#
View
6 actionpack/lib/action_controller/metal.rb
@@ -201,19 +201,23 @@ def to_a #:nodoc:
class_attribute :middleware_stack
self.middleware_stack = ActionController::MiddlewareStack.new
- def self.inherited(base)
+ def self.inherited(base) #nodoc:
base.middleware_stack = self.middleware_stack.dup
super
end
+ # Adds given middleware class and its args to bottom of middleware_stack
def self.use(*args, &block)
middleware_stack.use(*args, &block)
end
+ # Alias for middleware_stack
def self.middleware
middleware_stack
end
+ # Makes the controller a rack endpoint that points to the action in
+ # the given env's action_dispatch.request.path_parameters key.
def self.call(env)
action(env['action_dispatch.request.path_parameters'][:action]).call(env)
end
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_controller/metal/http_authentication.rb
@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ module HttpAuthentication
# class PostsController < ApplicationController
# REALM = "SuperSecret"
# USERS = {"dhh" => "secret", #plain text password
- # "dap" => Digest:MD5::hexdigest(["dap",REALM,"secret"].join(":")) #ha1 digest password
+ # "dap" => Digest::MD5.hexdigest(["dap",REALM,"secret"].join(":")) #ha1 digest password
#
# before_filter :authenticate, :except => [:index]
#
View
3  actionpack/lib/action_controller/metal/mime_responds.rb
@@ -222,6 +222,9 @@ def respond_to(*mimes, &block)
# is quite simple (it just needs to respond to call), you can even give
# a proc to it.
#
+ # In order to use respond_with, first you need to declare the formats your
+ # controller responds to in the class level with a call to <tt>respond_to</tt>.
+ #
def respond_with(*resources, &block)
raise "In order to use respond_with, first you need to declare the formats your " <<
"controller responds to in the class level" if self.class.mimes_for_respond_to.empty?
View
16 actionpack/lib/action_dispatch/testing/integration.rb
@@ -26,31 +26,31 @@ module RequestHelpers
# object's <tt>@response</tt> instance variable will point to the same
# response object.
#
- # You can also perform POST, PUT, DELETE, and HEAD requests with +post+,
- # +put+, +delete+, and +head+.
+ # You can also perform POST, PUT, DELETE, and HEAD requests with +#post+,
+ # +#put+, +#delete+, and +#head+.
def get(path, parameters = nil, headers = nil)
process :get, path, parameters, headers
end
- # Performs a POST request with the given parameters. See get() for more
+ # Performs a POST request with the given parameters. See +#get+ for more
# details.
def post(path, parameters = nil, headers = nil)
process :post, path, parameters, headers
end
- # Performs a PUT request with the given parameters. See get() for more
+ # Performs a PUT request with the given parameters. See +#get+ for more
# details.
def put(path, parameters = nil, headers = nil)
process :put, path, parameters, headers
end
- # Performs a DELETE request with the given parameters. See get() for
+ # Performs a DELETE request with the given parameters. See +#get+ for
# more details.
def delete(path, parameters = nil, headers = nil)
process :delete, path, parameters, headers
end
- # Performs a HEAD request with the given parameters. See get() for more
+ # Performs a HEAD request with the given parameters. See +#get+ for more
# details.
def head(path, parameters = nil, headers = nil)
process :head, path, parameters, headers
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ def head(path, parameters = nil, headers = nil)
# Performs an XMLHttpRequest request with the given parameters, mirroring
# a request from the Prototype library.
#
- # The request_method is :get, :post, :put, :delete or :head; the
+ # The request_method is +:get+, +:post+, +:put+, +:delete+ or +:head+; the
# parameters are +nil+, a hash, or a url-encoded or multipart string;
# the headers are a hash. Keys are automatically upcased and prefixed
# with 'HTTP_' if not already.
@@ -384,7 +384,7 @@ def integration_session
end
end
- # An test that spans multiple controllers and actions,
+ # An integration test spans multiple controllers and actions,
# tying them all together to ensure they work together as expected. It tests
# more completely than either unit or functional tests do, exercising the
# entire stack, from the dispatcher to the database.
View
10 actionpack/lib/action_view/base.rb
@@ -8,13 +8,13 @@
module ActionView #:nodoc:
# = Action View Base
#
- # Action View templates can be written in three ways. If the template file has a <tt>.erb</tt> (or <tt>.rhtml</tt>) extension then it uses a mixture of ERb
+ # Action View templates can be written in three ways. If the template file has a <tt>.erb</tt> (or <tt>.rhtml</tt>) extension then it uses a mixture of ERB
# (included in Ruby) and HTML. If the template file has a <tt>.builder</tt> (or <tt>.rxml</tt>) extension then Jim Weirich's Builder::XmlMarkup library is used.
# If the template file has a <tt>.rjs</tt> extension then it will use ActionView::Helpers::PrototypeHelper::JavaScriptGenerator.
#
- # == ERb
+ # == ERB
#
- # You trigger ERb by using embeddings such as <% %>, <% -%>, and <%= %>. The <%= %> tag set is used when you want output. Consider the
+ # You trigger ERB by using embeddings such as <% %>, <% -%>, and <%= %>. The <%= %> tag set is used when you want output. Consider the
# following loop for names:
#
# <b>Names of all the people</b>
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ module ActionView #:nodoc:
# <% end %>
#
# The loop is setup in regular embedding tags <% %> and the name is written using the output embedding tag <%= %>. Note that this
- # is not just a usage suggestion. Regular output functions like print or puts won't work with ERb templates. So this would be wrong:
+ # is not just a usage suggestion. Regular output functions like print or puts won't work with ERB templates. So this would be wrong:
#
# <%# WRONG %>
# Hi, Mr. <% puts "Frodo" %>
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ module ActionView #:nodoc:
#
# == Builder
#
- # Builder templates are a more programmatic alternative to ERb. They are especially useful for generating XML content. An XmlMarkup object
+ # Builder templates are a more programmatic alternative to ERB. They are especially useful for generating XML content. An XmlMarkup object
# named +xml+ is automatically made available to templates with a <tt>.builder</tt> extension.
#
# Here are some basic examples:
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/atom_feed_helper.rb
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ module ActionView
# = Action View Atom Feed Helpers
module Helpers #:nodoc:
module AtomFeedHelper
- # Adds easy defaults to writing Atom feeds with the Builder template engine (this does not work on ERb or any other
+ # Adds easy defaults to writing Atom feeds with the Builder template engine (this does not work on ERB or any other
# template languages).
#
# Full usage example:
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/capture_helper.rb
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ module CaptureHelper
# variable. You can then use this variable anywhere in your templates or layout.
#
# ==== Examples
- # The capture method can be used in ERb templates...
+ # The capture method can be used in ERB templates...
#
# <% @greeting = capture do %>
# Welcome to my shiny new web page! The date and time is
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/prototype_helper.rb
@@ -584,7 +584,7 @@ def update_page(&block)
# Works like update_page but wraps the generated JavaScript in a
# <tt>\<script></tt> tag. Use this to include generated JavaScript in an
- # ERb template. See JavaScriptGenerator for more information.
+ # ERB template. See JavaScriptGenerator for more information.
#
# +html_options+ may be a hash of <tt>\<script></tt> attributes to be
# passed to ActionView::Helpers::JavaScriptHelper#javascript_tag.
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/url_helper.rb
@@ -183,7 +183,7 @@ def url_for(options = {})
# link_to "Profiles", :controller => "profiles"
# # => <a href="/profiles">Profiles</a>
#
- # You can use a block as well if your link target is hard to fit into the name parameter. ERb example:
+ # You can use a block as well if your link target is hard to fit into the name parameter. ERB example:
#
# <%= link_to(@profile) do %>
# <strong><%= @profile.name %></strong> -- <span>Check it out!</span>
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_view/template/handlers/erb.rb
@@ -55,7 +55,7 @@ def add_postamble(src)
class ERB
# Specify trim mode for the ERB compiler. Defaults to '-'.
- # See ERb documentation for suitable values.
+ # See ERB documentation for suitable values.
class_attribute :erb_trim_mode
self.erb_trim_mode = '-'
View
21 activemodel/lib/active_model/errors.rb
@@ -278,19 +278,18 @@ def full_messages
# When using inheritance in your models, it will check all the inherited
# models too, but only if the model itself hasn't been found. Say you have
# <tt>class Admin < User; end</tt> and you wanted the translation for
- # the <tt>:blank</tt> error +message+ for the <tt>title</tt> +attribute+,
+ # the <tt>:blank</tt> error message for the <tt>title</tt> attribute,
# it looks for these translations:
#
- # <ol>
- # <li><tt>activemodel.errors.models.admin.attributes.title.blank</tt></li>
- # <li><tt>activemodel.errors.models.admin.blank</tt></li>
- # <li><tt>activemodel.errors.models.user.attributes.title.blank</tt></li>
- # <li><tt>activemodel.errors.models.user.blank</tt></li>
- # <li>any default you provided through the +options+ hash (in the activemodel.errors scope)</li>
- # <li><tt>activemodel.errors.messages.blank</tt></li>
- # <li><tt>errors.attributes.title.blank</tt></li>
- # <li><tt>errors.messages.blank</tt></li>
- # </ol>
+ # * <tt>activemodel.errors.models.admin.attributes.title.blank</tt>
+ # * <tt>activemodel.errors.models.admin.blank</tt>
+ # * <tt>activemodel.errors.models.user.attributes.title.blank</tt>
+ # * <tt>activemodel.errors.models.user.blank</tt>
+ # * any default you provided through the +options+ hash (in the <tt>activemodel.errors</tt> scope)
+ # * <tt>activemodel.errors.messages.blank</tt>
+ # * <tt>errors.attributes.title.blank</tt>
+ # * <tt>errors.messages.blank</tt>
+ #
def generate_message(attribute, type = :invalid, options = {})
type = options.delete(:message) if options[:message].is_a?(Symbol)
View
18 activerecord/lib/active_record/callbacks.rb
@@ -214,6 +214,24 @@ module ActiveRecord
# needs to be aware of it because an ordinary +save+ will raise such exception
# instead of quietly returning +false+.
#
+ # == Debugging callbacks
+ #
+ # The callback chain is accessible via the <tt>_*_callbacks</tt> method on an object. ActiveModel Callbacks support
+ # <tt>:before</tt>, <tt>:after</tt> and <tt>:around</tt> as values for the <tt>kind</tt> property. The <tt>kind</tt> property
+ # defines what part of the chain the callback runs in.
+ #
+ # To find all callbacks in the before_save callback chain:
+ #
+ # Topic._save_callbacks.select { |cb| cb.kind.eql?(:before) }
+ #
+ # Returns an array of callback objects that form the before_save chain.
+ #
+ # To further check if the before_save chain contains a proc defined as <tt>rest_when_dead</tt> use the <tt>filter</tt> property of the callback object:
+ #
+ # Topic._save_callbacks.select { |cb| cb.kind.eql?(:before) }.collect(&:filter).include?(:rest_when_dead)
+ #
+ # Returns true or false depending on whether the proc is contained in the before_save callback chain on a Topic model.
+ #
module Callbacks
extend ActiveSupport::Concern
View
6 activerecord/lib/active_record/fixtures.rb
@@ -173,10 +173,10 @@ class FixturesFileNotFound < StandardError; end
# traversed in the database to create the fixture hash and/or instance variables. This is expensive for
# large sets of fixtured data.
#
-# = Dynamic fixtures with ERb
+# = Dynamic fixtures with ERB
#
# Some times you don't care about the content of the fixtures as much as you care about the volume. In these cases, you can
-# mix ERb in with your YAML or CSV fixtures to create a bunch of fixtures for load testing, like:
+# mix ERB in with your YAML or CSV fixtures to create a bunch of fixtures for load testing, like:
#
# <% for i in 1..1000 %>
# fix_<%= i %>:
@@ -186,7 +186,7 @@ class FixturesFileNotFound < StandardError; end
#
# This will create 1000 very simple YAML fixtures.
#
-# Using ERb, you can also inject dynamic values into your fixtures with inserts like <tt><%= Date.today.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") %></tt>.
+# Using ERB, you can also inject dynamic values into your fixtures with inserts like <tt><%= Date.today.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") %></tt>.
# This is however a feature to be used with some caution. The point of fixtures are that they're
# stable units of predictable sample data. If you feel that you need to inject dynamic values, then
# perhaps you should reexamine whether your application is properly testable. Hence, dynamic values
View
23 activerecord/lib/active_record/named_scope.rb
@@ -99,6 +99,29 @@ def scoped(options = nil)
#
# Article.published.new.published # => true
# Article.published.create.published # => true
+ #
+ # Class methods on your model are automatically available
+ # on scopes. Assuming the following setup:
+ #
+ # class Article < ActiveRecord::Base
+ # scope :published, where(:published => true)
+ # scope :featured, where(:featured => true)
+ #
+ # def self.latest_article
+ # order('published_at desc').first
+ # end
+ #
+ # def self.titles
+ # map(&:title)
+ # end
+ #
+ # end
+ #
+ # We are able to call the methods like this:
+ #
+ # Article.published.featured.latest_article
+ # Article.featured.titles
+
def scope(name, scope_options = {})
name = name.to_sym
valid_scope_name?(name)
View
2  activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/string/output_safety.rb
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ module Util
# A utility method for escaping HTML tag characters.
# This method is also aliased as <tt>h</tt>.
#
- # In your ERb templates, use this method to escape any unsafe content. For example:
+ # In your ERB templates, use this method to escape any unsafe content. For example:
# <%=h @person.name %>
#
# ==== Example:
View
17 railties/guides/source/action_controller_overview.textile
@@ -615,26 +615,15 @@ Rails comes with two built-in HTTP authentication mechanisms:
h4. HTTP Basic Authentication
-HTTP basic authentication is an authentication scheme that is supported by the majority of browsers and other HTTP clients. As an example, consider an administration section which will only be available by entering a username and a password into the browser's HTTP basic dialog window. Using the built-in authentication is quite easy and only requires you to use one method, +authenticate_or_request_with_http_basic+.
+HTTP basic authentication is an authentication scheme that is supported by the majority of browsers and other HTTP clients. As an example, consider an administration section which will only be available by entering a username and a password into the browser's HTTP basic dialog window. Using the built-in authentication is quite easy and only requires you to use one method, +http_basic_authenticate_with+.
<ruby>
class AdminController < ApplicationController
- USERNAME, PASSWORD = "humbaba", "5baa61e4"
-
- before_filter :authenticate
-
- private
-
- def authenticate
- authenticate_or_request_with_http_basic do |username, password|
- username == USERNAME &&
- Digest::SHA1.hexdigest(password) == PASSWORD
- end
- end
+ http_basic_authenticate_with :name => "humbaba", :password => "5baa61e4"
end
</ruby>
-With this in place, you can create namespaced controllers that inherit from +AdminController+. The before filter will thus be run for all actions in those controllers, protecting them with HTTP basic authentication.
+With this in place, you can create namespaced controllers that inherit from +AdminController+. The filter will thus be run for all actions in those controllers, protecting them with HTTP basic authentication.
h4. HTTP Digest Authentication
View
2  railties/guides/source/action_view_overview.textile
@@ -1295,7 +1295,7 @@ end
h5. update_page_tag
-Works like update_page but wraps the generated JavaScript in a +script+ tag. Use this to include generated JavaScript in an ERb template.
+Works like update_page but wraps the generated JavaScript in a +script+ tag. Use this to include generated JavaScript in an ERB template.
h4. PrototypeHelper::JavaScriptGenerator::GeneratorMethods
View
2  railties/guides/source/api_documentation_guidelines.textile
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Documentation has to be concise but comprehensive. Explore and document edge cas
The proper names of Rails components have a space in between the words, like "Active Support". +ActiveRecord+ is a Ruby module, whereas Active Record is an ORM. All Rails documentation should consistently refer to Rails components by their proper name, and if in your next blog post or presentation you remember this tidbit and take it into account that'd be phenomenal.
-Spell names correctly: Arel, Test::Unit, RSpec, HTML, MySQL, JavaScript, ERb. When in doubt, please have a look at some authoritative source like their official documentation.
+Spell names correctly: Arel, Test::Unit, RSpec, HTML, MySQL, JavaScript, ERB. When in doubt, please have a look at some authoritative source like their official documentation.
Use the article "an" for "SQL", as in "an SQL statement". Also "an SQLite database".
View
2  railties/guides/source/command_line.textile
@@ -484,7 +484,7 @@ end
We take whatever args are supplied, save them to an instance variable, and literally copying from the Rails source, implement a +manifest+ method, which calls +record+ with a block, and we:
* Check there's a *public* directory. You bet there is.
-* Run the ERb template called "tutorial.erb".
+* Run the ERB template called "tutorial.erb".
* Save it into "Rails.root/public/tutorial.txt".
* Pass in the arguments we saved through the +:assigns+ parameter.
View
2  railties/guides/source/configuring.textile
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ h4. Configuring Middleware
Every Rails application comes with a standard set of middleware which it uses in this order in the development environment:
-* +Rack::SSL+ Will force every requests to be under HTTPS protocol. Will be available if +config.force_ssl+ is set to _true_.
+* +Rack::SSL+ Will force every request to be under HTTPS protocol. Will be available if +config.force_ssl+ is set to _true_.
* +ActionDispatch::Static+ is used to serve static assets. Disabled if +config.serve_static_assets+ is _true_.
* +Rack::Lock+ Will wrap the app in mutex so it can only be called by a single thread at a time. Only enabled if +config.action_controller.allow_concurrency+ is set to _false_, which it is by default.
* +ActiveSupport::Cache::Strategy::LocalCache+ Serves as a basic memory backed cache. This cache is not thread safe and is intended only for serving as a temporary memory cache for a single thread.
View
27 railties/guides/source/getting_started.textile
@@ -1201,33 +1201,16 @@ h3. Security
If you were to publish your blog online, anybody would be able to add, edit and delete posts or delete comments.
-Rails provides a very simple HTTP authentication system that will work nicely in this situation. First, we enable simple HTTP based authentication in our <tt>app/controllers/application_controller.rb</tt>:
+Rails provides a very simple HTTP authentication system that will work nicely in this situation.
-<ruby>
-class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
- protect_from_forgery
-
- private
-
- def authenticate
- authenticate_or_request_with_http_basic do |user_name, password|
- user_name == 'admin' && password == 'password'
- end
- end
-
-end
-</ruby>
-
-You can obviously change the username and password to whatever you want. We put this method inside of +ApplicationController+ so that it is available to all of our controllers.
-
-Then in the +PostsController+ we need to have a way to block access to the various actions if the person is not authenticated, here we can use the Rails <tt>before_filter</tt> method, which allows us to specify that Rails must run a method and only then allow access to the requested action if that method allows it.
+In the +PostsController+ we need to have a way to block access to the various actions if the person is not authenticated, here we can use the Rails <tt>http_basic_authenticate_with</tt> method, allowing access to the requested action if that method allows it.
-To use the before filter, we specify it at the top of our +PostsController+, in this case, we want the user to be authenticated on every action, except for +index+ and +show+, so we write that:
+To use the authentication system, we specify it at the top of our +PostsController+, in this case, we want the user to be authenticated on every action, except for +index+ and +show+, so we write that:
<ruby>
class PostsController < ApplicationController
- before_filter :authenticate, :except => [:index, :show]
+ http_basic_authenticate_with :name => "dhh", :password => "secret", :except => :index
# GET /posts
# GET /posts.xml
@@ -1242,7 +1225,7 @@ We also only want to allow authenticated users to delete comments, so in the +Co
<ruby>
class CommentsController < ApplicationController
- before_filter :authenticate, :only => :destroy
+ http_basic_authenticate_with :name => "dhh", :password => "secret", :only => :destroy
def create
@post = Post.find(params[:post_id])
View
5 railties/guides/source/initialization.textile
@@ -478,8 +478,7 @@ The next line in +config/application.rb+ is:
require 'rails/all'
</ruby>
-h4 +railties/lib/rails/all.rb+
-
+h4. +railties/lib/rails/all.rb+
This file is responsible for requiring all the individual parts of Rails like so:
@@ -591,7 +590,7 @@ h4. +activesupport/lib/active_support/deprecation/behaviors.rb+
This file defines the behavior of the +ActiveSupport::Deprecation+ module, setting up the +DEFAULT_BEHAVIORS+ hash constant which contains the three defaults to outputting deprecation warnings: +:stderr+, +:log+ and +:notify+. This file begins by requiring +activesupport/notifications+ and +activesupport/core_ext/array/wrap+.
-h4 +activesupport/lib/active_support/notifications.rb+
+h4. +activesupport/lib/active_support/notifications.rb+
TODO: document +ActiveSupport::Notifications+.
View
2  railties/guides/source/layout.html.erb
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@
<h3>Feedback</h3>
<p>
- You're encouraged to help in keeping the quality of this guide.
+ You're encouraged to help improve the quality of this guide.
</p>
<p>
If you see any typos or factual errors you are confident to
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19 railties/guides/source/ruby_on_rails_guides_guidelines.textile
@@ -10,10 +10,10 @@ Guides are written in "Textile":http://www.textism.com/tools/textile/. There's c
h3. Prologue
-Each guide should start with motivational text at the top. That's the little introduction in the blue area. The prologue should tell the readers what's the guide about, and what will they learn. See for example the "Routing Guide":routing.html.
+Each guide should start with motivational text at the top (that's the little introduction in the blue area.) The prologue should tell the reader what the guide is about, and what they will learn. See for example the "Routing Guide":routing.html.
h3. Titles
-
+
The title of every guide uses +h2+, guide sections use +h3+, subsections +h4+, etc.
Capitalize all words except for internal articles, prepositions, conjunctions, and forms of the verb to be:
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ h5. Middleware Stack is an Array
h5. When are Objects Saved?
</plain>
-Use same typography as in regular text:
+Use the same typography as in regular text:
<plain>
h6. The +:content_type+ Option
@@ -42,13 +42,13 @@ Those guidelines apply also to guides.
h3. HTML Generation
-To generate all the guides just cd into the +railties+ directory and execute
+To generate all the guides, just +cd+ into the +railties+ directory and execute:
<plain>
bundle exec rake generate_guides
</plain>
-You'll need the gems erubis, i18n, and RedCloth.
+(You may need to run +bundle install+ first to install the required gems.)
To process +my_guide.textile+ and nothing else use the +ONLY+ environment variable:
@@ -56,13 +56,13 @@ To process +my_guide.textile+ and nothing else use the +ONLY+ environment variab
bundle exec rake generate_guides ONLY=my_guide
</plain>
-Although by default guides that have not been modified are not processed, so +ONLY+ is rarely needed in practice.
+By default, guides that have not been modified are not processed, so +ONLY+ is rarely needed in practice.
To force process of all the guides, pass +ALL=1+.
-It is also recommended that you work with +WARNINGS=1+, this detects duplicate IDs and warns about broken internal links.
+It is also recommended that you work with +WARNINGS=1+. This detects duplicate IDs and warns about broken internal links.
-If you want to generate guides in languages other than English, you can keep them in a separate directory under +source+ (eg. <tt>source/es</tt>) and use the +LANGUAGE+ environment variable.
+If you want to generate guides in languages other than English, you can keep them in a separate directory under +source+ (eg. <tt>source/es</tt>) and use the +LANGUAGE+ environment variable:
<plain>
rake generate_guides LANGUAGE=es
@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@ rake generate_guides LANGUAGE=es
h3. HTML Validation
-Please do validate the generated HTML with
+Please validate the generated HTML with:
<plain>
rake validate_guides
@@ -80,4 +80,5 @@ Particularly, titles get an ID generated from their content and this often leads
h3. Changelog
+* March 31, 2011: grammar tweaks by "Josiah Ivey":http://twitter.com/josiahivey
* October 5, 2010: ported from the docrails wiki and revised by "Xavier Noria":credits.html#fxn
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9 railties/guides/source/testing.textile
@@ -79,9 +79,9 @@ steve:
Each fixture is given a name followed by an indented list of colon-separated key/value pairs. Records are separated by a blank space. You can place comments in a fixture file by using the # character in the first column.
-h5. ERb'in It Up
+h5. ERB'in It Up
-ERb allows you to embed ruby code within templates. Both the YAML and CSV fixture formats are pre-processed with ERb when you load fixtures. This allows you to use Ruby to help you generate some sample data.
+ERB allows you to embed ruby code within templates. Both the YAML and CSV fixture formats are pre-processed with ERB when you load fixtures. This allows you to use Ruby to help you generate some sample data.
<erb>
<% earth_size = 20 %>
@@ -391,7 +391,7 @@ There are a bunch of different types of assertions you can use. Here's the compl
|+assert_nil( obj, [msg] )+ |Ensures that +obj.nil?+ is true.|
|+assert_not_nil( obj, [msg] )+ |Ensures that +obj.nil?+ is false.|
|+assert_match( regexp, string, [msg] )+ |Ensures that a string matches the regular expression.|
-|+assert_no_match( regexp, string, [msg] )+ |Ensures that a string doesn't matches the regular expression.|
+|+assert_no_match( regexp, string, [msg] )+ |Ensures that a string doesn't match the regular expression.|
|+assert_in_delta( expecting, actual, delta, [msg] )+ |Ensures that the numbers +expecting+ and +actual+ are within +delta+ of each other.|
|+assert_throws( symbol, [msg] ) { block }+ |Ensures that the given block throws the symbol.|
|+assert_raise( exception1, exception2, ... ) { block }+ |Ensures that the given block raises one of the given exceptions.|
@@ -748,7 +748,8 @@ You don't need to set up and run your tests by hand on a test-by-test basis. Rai
h3. Brief Note About +Test::Unit+
-Ruby ships with a boat load of libraries. One little gem of a library is +Test::Unit+, a framework for unit testing in Ruby. All the basic assertions discussed above are actually defined in +Test::Unit::Assertions+. The class +ActiveSupport::TestCase+ which we have been using in our unit and functional tests extends +Test::Unit::TestCase+ that it is how we can use all the basic assertions in our tests.
+Ruby ships with a boat load of libraries. One little gem of a library is +Test::Unit+, a framework for unit testing in Ruby. All the basic assertions discussed above are actually defined in +Test::Unit::Assertions+. The class +ActiveSupport::TestCase+ which we have been using in our unit and functional tests extends +Test::Unit::TestCase+, allowing
+us to use all of the basic assertions in our tests.
NOTE: For more information on +Test::Unit+, refer to "test/unit Documentation":http://ruby-doc.org/stdlib/libdoc/test/unit/rdoc/
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4 railties/lib/rails/source_annotation_extractor.rb
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
#
# Annotations are looked for in comments and modulus whitespace they have to
# start with the tag optionally followed by a colon. Everything up to the end
-# of the line (or closing ERb comment tag) is considered to be their text.
+# of the line (or closing ERB comment tag) is considered to be their text.
class SourceAnnotationExtractor
class Annotation < Struct.new(:line, :tag, :text)
@@ -99,4 +99,4 @@ def display(results, options={})
puts
end
end
-end
+end

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