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Added CSV format for fixtures #272 [what-a-day]

git-svn-id: http://svn-commit.rubyonrails.org/rails/trunk@55 5ecf4fe2-1ee6-0310-87b1-e25e094e27de
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1 parent 165097e commit 5e3eaff5bb00c4d19d9ff2e80d32090e9515fe2c @dhh dhh committed Dec 7, 2004
Showing with 145 additions and 36 deletions.
  1. +2 −0 activerecord/CHANGELOG
  2. +143 −36 activerecord/lib/active_record/fixtures.rb
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@@ -1,5 +1,7 @@
*CVS*
+* Added CSV format for fixtures #272 [what-a-day]. (See the new and expanded documentation on fixtures for more information)
+
* Fixed fixtures using primary key fields called something else than "id" [dave]
* Added proper handling of time fields that are turned into Time objects with the dummy date of 2000/1/1 [HariSeldon]
@@ -1,54 +1,145 @@
require 'erb'
require 'yaml'
+require 'csv'
require 'active_record/support/class_inheritable_attributes'
require 'active_record/support/inflector'
-# Fixtures are a way of organizing data that you want to test against. You normally have one YAML file with fixture
-# definitions per model. They're just hashes of hashes with the first-level key being the name of fixture (try to keep
-# that name unique across all fixtures in the system for reasons that will follow). The value to that key is a hash
-# where the keys are column names and the values the fixture data you want to insert into it. Example for developers.yml:
+# Fixtures are a way of organizing data that you want to test against; in short, sample data. They come in 3 flavours:
#
-# david:
-# id: 1
-# name: David Heinemeier Hansson
-# birthday: 1979-10-15
-# profession: Systems development
+# 1. YAML fixtures
+# 2. CSV fixtures
+# 3. Single-file fixtures
#
-# steve:
-# id: 2
-# name: Steve Ross Kellock
-# birthday: 1974-09-27
-# profession: guy with keyboard
+# = YAML fixtures
#
-# So this YAML file includes two fixtures. T
+# This type of fixture is in YAML format and the preferred default. YAML is a file format which describes data structures
+# in a non-verbose, humanly-readable format. It ships with Ruby 1.8.1+.
#
-# Now when we call <tt>@developers = Fixtures.create_fixtures(".", "developers")</tt> both developers will get inserted into
-# the "developers" table through the active Active Record connection (that must be setup before-hand). And we can now query
-# the fixture data through the <tt>@developers</tt> hash, so <tt>@developers["david"]["name"]</tt> will return
-# <tt>"David Heinemeier Hansson"</tt> and <tt>@developers["david"]["birthday"]</tt> will return <tt>Date.new(1979, 10, 15)</tt>.
+# Unlike single-file fixtures, YAML fixtures are stored in a single file per model, which is place in the directory appointed
+# by <tt>Test::Unit::TestCase.fixture_path=(path)</tt> (this is automatically configured for Rails, so you can just
+# put your files in <your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/). The fixture file ends with the .yml file extension (Rails example:
+# "<your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/web_sites.yml"). The format of a YAML fixture file looks like this:
#
-# In addition to getting the raw data, we can also get the Developer object by doing @developers["david"].find. This can then
-# be used for comparison in a unit test. Something like:
+# rubyonrails:
+# id: 1
+# name: Ruby on Rails
+# url: http://www.rubyonrails.org
#
+# google:
+# id: 2
+# name: Google
+# url: http://www.google.com
+#
+# This YAML fixture file includes two fixtures. Each YAML fixture (ie. record) is given a name and is followed by an
+# indented list of key/value pairs in the "key: value" format. Records are separated by a blank line for your viewing
+# pleasure.
+#
+# = CSV fixtures
+#
+# Fixtures can also be kept in the in the Comma Separated Value format. Akin to YAML fixtures, CSV fixtures are stored
+# in a single file, but, instead end with the .csv file extension (Rails example: "<your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/web_sites.csv")
+#
+# The format of this tye of fixture file is much more compact than the others, but also a little harder to read by us
+# humans. The first line of the CSV file is a comma-separated list of field names. The rest of the file is then comprised
+# of the actual data (1 per line). Here's an example:
+#
+# id, name, url
+# 1, Ruby On Rails, http://www.rubyonrails.org
+# 2, Google, http://www.google.com
+#
+# Should you have a piece of data with a comma character in it, you can place double quotes around that value. If you
+# need to use a double quote character, you must escape it with another double quote.
+#
+# Another unique attribute of the CSV fixture is that it has *no* fixture name like the other two formats. Instead, the
+# fixture names are automatically generated by deriving the class name of the fixture file and adding an incrementing
+# number to the end. In our example, the 1st fixture would be called "web_site_1" and the 2nd one would be called
+# "web_site_2".
+#
+# Most databases and spreadsheets support exporting to CSV format, so this is a great format for you to choose if you
+# have existing data somewhere already.
+#
+# = Single-file fixtures
+#
+# This type of fixtures was the original format for Active Record that has since been deprecated in favor of the YAML and CSV formats.
+# Fixtures for this format are created by placing text files in a sub-directory (with the name of the model) to the directory
+# appointed by <tt>Test::Unit::TestCase.fixture_path=(path)</tt> (this is automatically configured for Rails, so you can just
+# put your files in <your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/<your-model-name>/ -- like <your-rails-app>/test/fixtures/web_sites/ for the WebSite
+# model).
+#
+# Each text file placed in this directory represents a "record". Usually these types of fixtures are named without
+# extensions, but if you are on a Windows machine, you might consider adding .txt as the extension. Here's what the
+# above example might look like:
+#
+# web_sites/google
+# web_sites/yahoo.txt
+# web_sites/ruby-on-rails
+#
+# The file format of a standard fixture is simple. Each line is a property (or column in db speak) and has the syntax
+# of "name => value". Here's an example of the ruby-on-rails fixture above:
+#
+# id => 1
+# name => Ruby on Rails
+# url => http://www.rubyonrails.org
+#
+# = Using Fixtures
+#
+# Since fixtures are a testing construct, we use them in our unit and functional tests. There are two ways to use the
+# fixtures, but first lets take a look at a sample unit test found:
+#
+# require 'web_site'
+#
+# class WebSiteTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
+# def test_web_site_count
+# assert_equal 2, WebSite.count
+# end
+# end
+#
+# As it stands, unless we pre-load the web_site table in our database with two records, this test will fail. Here's the
+# easiest way to add fixtures to the database:
+#
+# ...
+# class WebSiteTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
+# fixtures :web_sites # add more by separating the symbols with commas
+# ...
+#
+# By adding a "fixtures" method to the test case and passing it a list of symbols (only one is shown here tho), we trigger
+# the testing environment to automatically load the appropriate fixtures into the database before each test, and
+# automatically delete them after each test.
+#
+# In addition to being available in the database, the fixtures are also loaded into a hash stored in an instance variable
+# of the test case. It is named after the symbol... so, in our example, there would be a hash available called
+# @web_sites. This is where the "fixture name" comes into play.
+#
+# On top of that, each record is automatically "found" (using Model.find(id)) and placed in the instance variable of its name.
+# So for the YAML fixtures, we'd get @rubyonrails and @google, which could be interrogated using regular Active Record semantics:
+#
+# # test if the object created from the fixture data has the same attributes as the data itself
# def test_find
-# assert_equal @developers["david"]["name"], @developers["david"].find.name
+# assert_equal @web_sites["rubyonrails"]["name"], @rubyonrails.name
# end
#
-# Comparing that the data we have on the name is also what the object returns when we ask for it.
+# As seen above, the data hash created from the YAML fixtures would have @web_sites["rubyonrails"]["url"] return
+# "http://www.rubyonrails.org" and @web_sites["google"]["name"] would return "Google". The same fixtures, but loaded
+# from a CSV fixture file would be accessible via @web_sites["web_site_1"]["name"] == "Ruby on Rails" and have the individual
+# fixtures available as instance variables @web_site_1 and @web_site_2.
#
-# == Automatic fixture setup and instance variable availability
+# = Dynamic fixtures with ERb
#
-# Fixtures can also be automatically instantiated in instance variables relating to their names using the following style:
+# Some times you don't care about the content of the fixtures as much as you care about the volume. In these cases, you can
+# mix ERb in with your YAML or CSV fixtures to create a bunch of fixtures for load testing, like:
#
-# class FixturesTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
-# fixtures :developers # you can add more with comma separation
+# <% for i in 1..1000 %>
+# fix_<%= i %>:
+# id: <%= i %>
+# name: guy_<%= 1 %>
+# <% end %>
#
-# def test_developers
-# assert_equal 3, @developers.size # the container for all the fixtures is automatically set
-# assert_kind_of Developer, @david # works like @developers["david"].find
-# assert_equal "David Heinemeier Hansson", @david.name
-# end
-# end
+# This will create 1000 YAML very simple fixtures.
+#
+# Using ERb, you can also inject dynamic values into your fixtures with inserts like <%= Date.today.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") %>.
+# This is however a feature to be used with some caution. The point of fixtures are that they're stable units of predictable
+# sample data. If you feel that you need to inject dynamic values, then perhaps you should reexamine whether your application
+# is properly testable. Hence, dynamic values in fixtures are to be considered a code smell.
class Fixtures < Hash
def self.instantiate_fixtures(object, fixtures_directory, *table_names)
[ create_fixtures(fixtures_directory, *table_names) ].flatten.each_with_index do |fixtures, idx|
@@ -68,16 +159,16 @@ def self.create_fixtures(fixtures_directory, *table_names)
fixtures = table_names.flatten.map do |table_name|
Fixtures.new(connection, table_name.to_s, File.join(fixtures_directory, table_name.to_s))
end
- fixtures.reverse.each{ |fixture| fixture.delete_existing_fixtures }
- fixtures.each{ |fixture| fixture.insert_fixtures }
+ fixtures.reverse.each { |fixture| fixture.delete_existing_fixtures }
+ fixtures.each { |fixture| fixture.insert_fixtures }
end
return fixtures.size > 1 ? fixtures : fixtures.first
ensure
ActiveRecord::Base.logger.level = old_logger_level
end
end
- def initialize(connection, table_name, fixture_path, file_filter = /^\.|CVS|\.yml/)
+ def initialize(connection, table_name, fixture_path, file_filter = /^\.|CVS|\.yml|\.csv/)
@connection, @table_name, @fixture_path, @file_filter = connection, table_name, fixture_path, file_filter
@class_name = Inflector.classify(@table_name)
@@ -97,10 +188,22 @@ def insert_fixtures
private
def read_fixture_files
if File.exists?(yaml_file_path)
+ # YAML fixtures
YAML::load(erb_render(IO.read(yaml_file_path))).each do |name, data|
self[name] = Fixture.new(data, @class_name)
end
+ elsif File.exists?(csv_file_path)
+ # CSV fixtures
+ reader = CSV::Reader.create(erb_render(IO.read(csv_file_path)))
+ header = reader.shift
+ i = 0
+ reader.each do |row|
+ data = {}
+ row.each_with_index { |cell, j| data[header[j].to_s.strip] = cell.to_s.strip }
+ self["#{Inflector::underscore(@class_name)}_#{i+=1}"]= Fixture.new(data, @class_name)
+ end
else
+ # Standard fixtures
Dir.entries(@fixture_path).each do |file|
self[file] = Fixture.new(File.join(@fixture_path, file), @class_name) unless file =~ @file_filter
end
@@ -110,6 +213,10 @@ def read_fixture_files
def yaml_file_path
@fixture_path + ".yml"
end
+
+ def csv_file_path
+ @fixture_path + ".csv"
+ end
def yaml_fixtures_key(path)
File.basename(@fixture_path).split(".").first

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