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4 README.rdoc
@@ -53,8 +53,8 @@ more separate. Each of these packages can be used independently outside of
* The README file created within your application.
* The {Getting Started with Rails}[http://guides.rubyonrails.org/getting_started.html].
* The {Ruby on Rails Tutorial}[http://railstutorial.org/book].
-* The {Ruby on Rails guides}[http://guides.rubyonrails.org/getting_started.html].
-* The {API documentation}[http://api.rubyonrails.org].
+* The {Ruby on Rails Guides}[http://guides.rubyonrails.org].
+* The {API Documentation}[http://api.rubyonrails.org].
== Contributing
View
4 actionpack/CHANGELOG
@@ -47,9 +47,7 @@
* Symbols and strings in routes should yield the same behavior. Note this may break existing apps that were using symbols with the new routes API. [José Valim]
-* Add clear_helpers as a way to clean up all helpers added to this controller, maintaing just the helper with the same name as the controller. [José Valim]
-
-* See http://github.com/rails/rails/compare/v3.0.0_RC...v3.0.0_RC2 for gory details
+* Add clear_helpers as a way to clean up all helpers added to this controller, maintaining just the helper with the same name as the controller. [José Valim]
* Support routing constraints in functional tests. [Andrew White]
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_controller/base.rb
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ module ActionController
#
# Actions, by default, render a template in the <tt>app/views</tt> directory corresponding to the name of the controller and action
# after executing code in the action. For example, the +index+ action of the PostsController would render the
- # template <tt>app/views/posts/index.erb</tt> by default after populating the <tt>@posts</tt> instance variable.
+ # template <tt>app/views/posts/index.html.erb</tt> by default after populating the <tt>@posts</tt> instance variable.
#
# Unlike index, the create action will not render a template. After performing its main purpose (creating a
# new post), it initiates a redirect instead. This redirect works by returning an external
View
2  actionpack/lib/action_view/base.rb
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ module ActionView #:nodoc:
# following loop for names:
#
# <b>Names of all the people</b>
- # <% for person in @people %>
+ # <% @people.each do |person| %>
# Name: <%= person.name %><br/>
# <% end %>
#
View
20 actionpack/lib/action_view/partials.rb
@@ -12,19 +12,19 @@ module ActionView
#
# <%= render :partial => "account" %>
#
- # This would render "advertiser/_account.erb" and pass the instance variable @account in as a local variable
+ # This would render "advertiser/_account.html.erb" and pass the instance variable @account in as a local variable
# +account+ to the template for display.
#
# In another template for Advertiser#buy, we could have:
#
# <%= render :partial => "account", :locals => { :account => @buyer } %>
#
- # <% for ad in @advertisements %>
+ # <% @advertisements.each do |ad| %>
# <%= render :partial => "ad", :locals => { :ad => ad } %>
# <% end %>
#
- # This would first render "advertiser/_account.erb" with @buyer passed in as the local variable +account+, then
- # render "advertiser/_ad.erb" and pass the local variable +ad+ to the template for display.
+ # This would first render "advertiser/_account.html.erb" with @buyer passed in as the local variable +account+, then
+ # render "advertiser/_ad.html.erb" and pass the local variable +ad+ to the template for display.
#
# == The :as and :object options
#
@@ -44,12 +44,12 @@ module ActionView
#
# The <tt>:object</tt> option can be used to directly specify which object is rendered into the partial;
# useful when the template's object is elsewhere, in a different ivar or in a local variable for instance.
- #
+ #
# Revisiting a previous example we could have written this code:
- #
+ #
# <%= render :partial => "account", :object => @buyer %>
#
- # <% for ad in @advertisements %>
+ # <% @advertisements.each do |ad| %>
# <%= render :partial => "ad", :object => ad %>
# <% end %>
#
@@ -64,12 +64,12 @@ module ActionView
#
# <%= render :partial => "ad", :collection => @advertisements %>
#
- # This will render "advertiser/_ad.erb" and pass the local variable +ad+ to the template for display. An
+ # This will render "advertiser/_ad.html.erb" and pass the local variable +ad+ to the template for display. An
# iteration counter will automatically be made available to the template with a name of the form
# +partial_name_counter+. In the case of the example above, the template would be fed +ad_counter+.
#
# The <tt>:as</tt> option may be used when rendering partials.
- #
+ #
# You can specify a partial to be rendered between elements via the <tt>:spacer_template</tt> option.
# The following example will render <tt>advertiser/_ad_divider.html.erb</tt> between each ad partial:
#
@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ module ActionView
#
# <%= render :partial => "advertisement/ad", :locals => { :ad => @advertisement } %>
#
- # This will render the partial "advertisement/_ad.erb" regardless of which controller this is being called from.
+ # This will render the partial "advertisement/_ad.html.erb" regardless of which controller this is being called from.
#
# == Rendering objects with the RecordIdentifier
#
View
2  railties/guides/rails_guides/generator.rb
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@
#
# Separate many using commas:
#
-# # generates only
+# # generates only association_basics.html and migrations.html
# ONLY=assoc,migrations ruby rails_guides.rb
#
# Note that if you are working on a guide generation will by default process
View
10 railties/guides/source/action_view_overview.textile
@@ -367,14 +367,14 @@ This helper makes building an ATOM feed easy. Here's a full usage example:
*config/routes.rb*
<ruby>
-map.resources :posts
+resources :posts
</ruby>
*app/controllers/posts_controller.rb*
<ruby>
def index
- @posts = Post.find(:all)
+ @posts = Post.all
respond_to do |format|
format.html
@@ -439,7 +439,7 @@ The +capture+ method allows you to extract part of a template into a variable. Y
<% @greeting = capture do %>
<p>Welcome! The date and time is <%= Time.now %></p>
<% end %>
-<ruby>
+</ruby>
The captured variable can then be used anywhere else.
@@ -809,7 +809,7 @@ end
Sample usage (selecting the associated Author for an instance of Post, +@post+):
<ruby>
-collection_select(:post, :author_id, Author.find(:all), :id, :name_with_initial, {:prompt => true})
+collection_select(:post, :author_id, Author.all, :id, :name_with_initial, {:prompt => true})
</ruby>
If @post.author_id is already 1, this would return:
@@ -910,7 +910,7 @@ Create a select tag and a series of contained option tags for the provided objec
Example with @post.person_id => 1:
<ruby>
-select("post", "person_id", Person.find(:all).collect {|p| [ p.name, p.id ] }, { :include_blank => true })
+select("post", "person_id", Person.all.collect {|p| [ p.name, p.id ] }, { :include_blank => true })
</ruby>
could become:
View
6 railties/guides/source/active_record_querying.textile
@@ -150,7 +150,7 @@ SQL equivalent of the above is:
SELECT * FROM clients WHERE (clients.id IN (1,10))
</sql>
-<tt>Model.find(array_of_primary_key)</tt> will raise an +ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound+ exception unless a matching record is found for <strong>all</strong> of the supplied primary keys.
+WARNING: <tt>Model.find(array_of_primary_key)</tt> will raise an +ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound+ exception unless a matching record is found for <strong>all</strong> of the supplied primary keys.
h4. Retrieving Multiple Objects in Batches
@@ -569,9 +569,7 @@ SELECT clients.* FROM clients LEFT OUTER JOIN addresses ON addresses.client_id =
h4. Using Array/Hash of Named Associations
-WARNING: This method only works with +INNER JOIN+,
-
-<br />
+WARNING: This method only works with +INNER JOIN+.
Active Record lets you use the names of the "associations":association_basics.html defined on the model as a shortcut for specifying +JOIN+ clause for those associations when using the +joins+ method.
View
8 railties/guides/source/active_support_core_extensions.textile
@@ -498,7 +498,7 @@ h4. Attributes
h5. +alias_attribute+
-Model attributes have a reader, a writer, and a predicate. You can aliase a model attribute having the corresponding three methods defined for you in one shot. As in other aliasing methods, the new name is the first argument, and the old name is the second (my mnemonic is they go in the same order as if you did an assignment):
+Model attributes have a reader, a writer, and a predicate. You can alias a model attribute having the corresponding three methods defined for you in one shot. As in other aliasing methods, the new name is the first argument, and the old name is the second (my mnemonic is they go in the same order as if you did an assignment):
<ruby>
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
@@ -563,7 +563,7 @@ h5. Internal Attributes
When you are defining an attribute in a class that is meant to be subclassed name collisions are a risk. That's remarkably important for libraries.
-Active Support defines the macros +attr_internal_reader+, +attr_internal_writer+, and +attr_internal_accessor+. They behave like their Ruby builtin +attr_*+ counterparts, except they name the underlying instance variable in a way that makes collisions less likely.
+Active Support defines the macros +attr_internal_reader+, +attr_internal_writer+, and +attr_internal_accessor+. They behave like their Ruby built-in +attr_*+ counterparts, except they name the underlying instance variable in a way that makes collisions less likely.
The macro +attr_internal+ is a synonym for +attr_internal_accessor+:
@@ -991,7 +991,7 @@ a2.x # => 2, overridden in a2
The generation of the writer instance method can be prevented by setting the option +:instance_writer+ to false, as in
<ruby>
-module AcitveRecord
+module ActiveRecord
class Base
class_attribute :table_name_prefix, :instance_writer => false
self.table_name_prefix = ""
@@ -1001,7 +1001,7 @@ end
A model may find that option useful as a way to prevent mass-assignment from setting the attribute.
-For convenience +class_attribute+ defines also an instance predicate which is the double negation of what the instance reader returns. In the examples above it would be called +x?+.
+For convenience +class_attribute+ also defines an instance predicate which is the double negation of what the instance reader returns. In the examples above it would be called +x?+.
NOTE: Defined in +active_support/core_ext/class/attribute.rb+
View
6 railties/guides/source/association_basics.textile
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ To learn more about the different types of associations, read the next section o
h3. The Types of Associations
-In Rails, an _association_ is a connection between two Active Record models. Associations are implemented using macro-style calls, so that you can declaratively add features to your models. For example, by declaring that one model +belongs_to+ another, you instruct Rails to maintain Primary Key–Foreign Key information between instances of the two models, and you also get a number of utility methods added to your model. Rails supports six types of association:
+In Rails, an _association_ is a connection between two Active Record models. Associations are implemented using macro-style calls, so that you can declaratively add features to your models. For example, by declaring that one model +belongs_to+ another, you instruct Rails to maintain Primary Key–Foreign Key information between instances of the two models, and you also get a number of utility methods added to your model. Rails supports six types of associations:
* +belongs_to+
* +has_one+
@@ -1135,7 +1135,7 @@ h6(#has_many-collection-find). <tt><em>collection</em>.find(...)</tt>
The <tt><em>collection</em>.find</tt> method finds objects within the collection. It uses the same syntax and options as +ActiveRecord::Base.find+.
<ruby>
-@open_orders = @customer.orders.find(:all, :conditions => "open = 1")
+@open_orders = @customer.orders.all(:conditions => "open = 1")
</ruby>
NOTE: Starting Rails 3, supplying options to +ActiveRecord::Base.find+ method is discouraged. Use <tt><em>collection</em>.where</tt> instead when you need to pass conditions.
@@ -1564,7 +1564,7 @@ h6(#has_and_belongs_to_many-collection-find). <tt><em>collection</em>.find(...)<
The <tt><em>collection</em>.find</tt> method finds objects within the collection. It uses the same syntax and options as +ActiveRecord::Base.find+. It also adds the additional condition that the object must be in the collection.
<ruby>
-@new_assemblies = @part.assemblies.find(:all,
+@new_assemblies = @part.assemblies.all(
:conditions => ["created_at > ?", 2.days.ago])
</ruby>
View
6 railties/guides/source/debugging_rails_applications.textile
@@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ If you got there by a browser request, the browser tab containing the request wi
For example:
<shell>
-@posts = Post.find(:all)
+@posts = Post.all
(rdb:7)
</shell>
@@ -302,7 +302,7 @@ This command shows you where you are in the code by printing 10 lines centered a
3 # GET /posts.xml
4 def index
5 debugger
-=> 6 @posts = Post.find(:all)
+=> 6 @posts = Post.all
7
8 respond_to do |format|
9 format.html # index.html.erb
@@ -380,7 +380,7 @@ Any expression can be evaluated in the current context. To evaluate an expressio
This example shows how you can print the instance_variables defined within the current context:
<shell>
-@posts = Post.find(:all)
+@posts = Post.all
(rdb:11) instance_variables
["@_response", "@action_name", "@url", "@_session", "@_cookies", "@performed_render", "@_flash", "@template", "@_params", "@before_filter_chain_aborted", "@request_origin", "@_headers", "@performed_redirect", "@_request"]
</shell>
View
10 railties/guides/source/getting_started.textile
@@ -163,7 +163,7 @@ $ rails new blog
This will create a Rails application called Blog in a directory called blog.
-TIP: You can see all of the switches that the Rails application builder accepts by running <tt>rails -h</tt>.
+TIP: You can see all of the switches that the Rails application builder accepts by running <tt>rails new -h</tt>.
After you create the blog application, switch to its folder to continue work directly in that application:
@@ -258,6 +258,8 @@ development:
Change the username and password in the +development+ section as appropriate.
+TIP: You don't have to update the database configurations manually. If you had a look at the options of application generator, you have seen that one of them is named <tt>--database</tt>. It lets you choose an adapter for couple of most used relational databases. You can even run the generator repeatedly: <tt>cd .. && rails new blog --database=mysql</tt>. When you confirm the overwriting of the +config/database.yml+ file, your application will be configured for MySQL instead of SQLite.
+
h4. Creating the Database
Now that you have your database configured, it's time to have Rails create an empty database for you. You can do this by running a rake command:
@@ -298,7 +300,7 @@ To get Rails saying "Hello", you need to create at minimum a controller and a vi
$ rails generate controller home index
</shell>
-TIP: If you're on Windows, or your Ruby is set up in some non-standard fashion, you may need to explicitly pass Rails +rails+ commands to Ruby: +ruby \path\to\rails controller home index+.
+TIP: If you're on Windows, or your Ruby is set up in some non-standard fashion, you may need to explicitly pass Rails +rails+ commands to Ruby: <tt>ruby \path\to\your\application\script\rails generate controller home index</tt>.
Rails will create several files for you, including +app/views/home/index.html.erb+. This is the template that will be used to display the results of the +index+ action (method) in the +home+ controller. Open this file in your text editor and edit it to contain a single line of code:
@@ -347,7 +349,7 @@ In the case of the blog application, you can start by generating a scaffolded Po
$ rails generate scaffold Post name:string title:string content:text
</shell>
-NOTE. While scaffolding will get you up and running quickly, the "one size fits all" code that it generates is unlikely to be a perfect fit for your application. In most cases, you'll need to customize the generated code. Many experienced Rails developers avoid scaffolding entirely, preferring to write all or most of their source code from scratch.
+NOTE. While scaffolding will get you up and running quickly, the code it generates is unlikely to be a perfect fit for your application. You'll most probably want to customize the generated code. Many experienced Rails developers avoid scaffolding entirely, preferring to write all or most of their source code from scratch. Rails, however, makes it really simple to customize templates for generated models, controllers, views and other source files. You'll find more information in the "Creating and Customizing Rails Generators & Templates":generators.html guide.
The scaffold generator will build 15 files in your application, along with some folders, and edit one more. Here's a quick overview of what it creates:
@@ -409,7 +411,7 @@ Rails will execute this migration command and tell you it created the Posts tabl
== CreatePosts: migrated (0.0020s) ===========================================
</shell>
-NOTE. Because you're working in the development environment by default, this command will apply to the database defined in the +development+ section of your +config/database.yml+ file.
+NOTE. Because you're working in the development environment by default, this command will apply to the database defined in the +development+ section of your +config/database.yml+ file. If you would like to execute migrations in other environment, for instance in production, you must explicitely pass it when invoking the command: <tt>rake db:migrate RAILS_ENV=production</tt>.
h4. Adding a Link
View
14 railties/guides/source/i18n.textile
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ So, in the process of _internationalizing_ your Rails application you have to:
* Tell Rails where to find locale dictionaries
* Tell Rails how to set, preserve and switch locale
-In the process of _localizing_ your application you'll probably want to do following three things:
+In the process of _localizing_ your application you'll probably want to do the following three things:
* Replace or supplement Rails' default locale -- e.g. date and time formats, month names, Active Record model names, etc
* Abstract strings in your application into keyed dictionaries -- e.g. flash messages, static text in your views, etc.
@@ -305,12 +305,12 @@ end
# app/controllers/home_controller.rb
class HomeController < ApplicationController
def index
- flash[:notice] = "Hello flash!"
+ flash[:notice] = "Hello Flash"
end
end
# app/views/home/index.html.erb
-<h1>Hello world!</h1>
+<h1>Hello World</h1>
<p><%= flash[:notice] %></p>
</ruby>
@@ -344,8 +344,8 @@ So let's add the missing translations into the dictionary files (i.e. do the "lo
<ruby>
# config/locales/en.yml
en:
- hello_world: Hello World
- hello_flash: Hello Flash
+ hello_world: Hello world!
+ hello_flash: Hello flash!
# config/locales/pirate.yml
pirate:
@@ -586,7 +586,7 @@ I18n.t :foo
I18n.l Time.now
</ruby>
-Explicitely passing a locale:
+Explicitly passing a locale:
<ruby>
I18n.t :foo, :locale => :de
@@ -623,7 +623,7 @@ pt:
bar: baz
</ruby>
-As you see, in both cases the toplevel key is the locale. +:foo+ is a namespace key and +:bar+ is the key for the translation "baz".
+As you see, in both cases the top level key is the locale. +:foo+ is a namespace key and +:bar+ is the key for the translation "baz".
Here is a "real" example from the Active Support +en.yml+ translations YAML file:
View
3,591 railties/guides/source/initialization.textile
218 additions, 3,373 deletions not shown
View
6 railties/guides/source/performance_testing.textile
@@ -60,8 +60,8 @@ Let's assume your application has the following controller and model:
<ruby>
# routes.rb
-map.root :controller => 'home'
-map.resources :posts
+root :to => 'home#index'
+resources :posts
# home_controller.rb
class HomeController < ApplicationController
@@ -436,7 +436,7 @@ h4. Model
Project.benchmark("Creating project") do
project = Project.create("name" => "stuff")
project.create_manager("name" => "David")
- project.milestones << Milestone.find(:all)
+ project.milestones << Milestone.all
end
</ruby>
View
104 railties/guides/source/plugins.textile
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ This guide describes how to build a test-driven plugin that will:
* Add a custom generator command
* A custom route method that can be used in routes.rb
-For the purpose of this guide pretend for a moment that you are an avid bird watcher. Your favorite bird is the Yaffle, and you want to create a plugin that allows other developers to share in the Yaffle goodness. First, you need to get setup for development.
+For the purpose of this guide pretend for a moment that you are an avid bird watcher. Your favorite bird is the Yaffle, and you want to create a plugin that allows other developers to share in the Yaffle goodness. First, you need to get setup for development.
endprologue.
@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@ h3. Setup
h4. Create the Basic Application
-The examples in this guide require that you have a working rails application. To create a simple one execute:
+The examples in this guide require that you have a working rails application. To create a simple one execute:
<shell>
gem install rails
@@ -45,9 +45,9 @@ rake db:migrate
rails server
</shell>
-Then navigate to http://localhost:3000/birds. Make sure you have a functioning rails application before continuing.
+Then navigate to http://localhost:3000/birds. Make sure you have a functioning rails application before continuing.
-NOTE: The aforementioned instructions will work for sqlite3. For more detailed instructions on how to create a rails application for other databases see the API docs.
+NOTE: The aforementioned instructions will work for SQLite3. For more detailed instructions on how to create a Rails application for other databases see the API docs.
h4. Generate the Plugin Skeleton
@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ Now you can add any +require+ statements to +lib/yaffle.rb+ and keep +init.rb+ c
h3. Tests
-In this guide you will learn how to test your plugin against multiple different database adapters using Active Record. To setup your plugin to allow for easy testing you'll need to add 3 files:
+In this guide you will learn how to test your plugin against multiple different database adapters using Active Record. To setup your plugin to allow for easy testing you'll need to add 3 files:
* A +database.yml+ file with all of your connection strings
* A +schema.rb+ file with your table definitions
@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ postgresql:
min_messages: ERROR
mysql:
- adapter: mysql
+ adapter: mysql2
host: localhost
username: root
password: password
@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ Finished in 0.002236 seconds.
1 test, 2 assertion, 0 failures, 0 errors, 0 skips
</shell>
-By default the setup above runs your tests with sqlite or sqlite3. To run tests with one of the other connection strings specified in +database.yml+, pass the DB environment variable to rake:
+By default the setup above runs your tests with SQLite or SQLite3. To run tests with one of the other connection strings specified in +database.yml+, pass the DB environment variable to rake:
<shell>
rake DB=sqlite
@@ -281,9 +281,9 @@ Now you are ready to test-drive your plugin!
h3. Extending Core Classes
-This section will explain how to add a method to String that will be available anywhere in your rails application.
+This section will explain how to add a method to String that will be available anywhere in your Rails application.
-In this example you will add a method to String named +to_squawk+. To begin, create a new test file with a few assertions:
+In this example you will add a method to String named +to_squawk+. To begin, create a new test file with a few assertions:
<ruby>
# vendor/plugins/yaffle/test/core_ext_test.rb
@@ -345,7 +345,7 @@ $ rails console
h4. Working with +init.rb+
-When Rails loads plugins it looks for a file named +init.rb+. However, when the plugin is initialized, +init.rb+ is invoked via +eval+ (not +require+) so it has slightly different behavior.
+When Rails loads plugins it looks for a file named +init.rb+. However, when the plugin is initialized, +init.rb+ is invoked via +eval+ (not +require+) so it has slightly different behavior.
NOTE: The plugins loader also looks for +rails/init.rb+, but that one is deprecated in favor of the top-level +init.rb+ aforementioned.
@@ -377,7 +377,7 @@ end
h3. Add an "acts_as" Method to Active Record
-A common pattern in plugins is to add a method called 'acts_as_something' to models. In this case, you want to write a method called 'acts_as_yaffle' that adds a 'squawk' method to your models.
+A common pattern in plugins is to add a method called 'acts_as_something' to models. In this case, you want to write a method called 'acts_as_yaffle' that adds a 'squawk' method to your models.
To begin, set up your files so that you have:
@@ -433,7 +433,7 @@ With structure you can easily separate the methods that will be used for the cla
h4. Add a Class Method
-This plugin will expect that you've added a method to your model named 'last_squawk'. However, the plugin users might have already defined a method on their model named 'last_squawk' that they use for something else. This plugin will allow the name to be changed by adding a class method called 'yaffle_text_field'.
+This plugin will expect that you've added a method to your model named 'last_squawk'. However, the plugin users might have already defined a method on their model named 'last_squawk' that they use for something else. This plugin will allow the name to be changed by adding a class method called 'yaffle_text_field'.
To start out, write a failing test that shows the behavior you'd like:
@@ -486,7 +486,7 @@ ActiveRecord::Base.send :include, Yaffle
h4. Add an Instance Method
-This plugin will add a method named 'squawk' to any Active Record objects that call 'acts_as_yaffle'. The 'squawk' method will simply set the value of one of the fields in the database.
+This plugin will add a method named 'squawk' to any Active Record objects that call 'acts_as_yaffle'. The 'squawk' method will simply set the value of one of the fields in the database.
To start out, write a failing test that shows the behavior you'd like:
@@ -556,11 +556,11 @@ end
ActiveRecord::Base.send :include, Yaffle
</ruby>
-NOTE: The use of +write_attribute+ to write to the field in model is just one example of how a plugin can interact with the model, and will not always be the right method to use. For example, you could also use +send("#{self.class.yaffle_text_field}=", string.to_squawk)+.
+NOTE: The use of +write_attribute+ to write to the field in model is just one example of how a plugin can interact with the model, and will not always be the right method to use. For example, you could also use +send("#{self.class.yaffle_text_field}=", string.to_squawk)+.
h3. Models
-This section describes how to add a model named 'Woodpecker' to your plugin that will behave the same as a model in your main app. When storing models, controllers, views and helpers in your plugin, it's customary to keep them in directories that match the rails directories. For this example, create a file structure like this:
+This section describes how to add a model named 'Woodpecker' to your plugin that will behave the same as a model in your main app. When storing models, controllers, views and helpers in your plugin, it's customary to keep them in directories that match the rails directories. For this example, create a file structure like this:
<shell>
vendor/plugins/yaffle/
@@ -594,7 +594,7 @@ class WoodpeckerTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
end
</ruby>
-This is just a simple test to make sure the class is being loaded correctly. After watching it fail with +rake+, you can make it pass like so:
+This is just a simple test to make sure the class is being loaded correctly. After watching it fail with +rake+, you can make it pass like so:
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/lib/yaffle.rb:*
@@ -607,7 +607,7 @@ This is just a simple test to make sure the class is being loaded correctly. Af
end
</ruby>
-Adding directories to the load path makes them appear just like files in the main app directory - except that they are only loaded once, so you have to restart the web server to see the changes in the browser. Removing directories from the 'load_once_paths' allow those changes to picked up as soon as you save the file - without having to restart the web server. This is particularly useful as you develop the plugin.
+Adding directories to the load path makes them appear just like files in the main app directory - except that they are only loaded once, so you have to restart the web server to see the changes in the browser. Removing directories from the 'load_once_paths' allow those changes to picked up as soon as you save the file - without having to restart the web server. This is particularly useful as you develop the plugin.
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/lib/app/models/woodpecker.rb:*
@@ -630,7 +630,7 @@ Now your test should be passing, and you should be able to use the Woodpecker mo
h3. Controllers
-This section describes how to add a controller named 'woodpeckers' to your plugin that will behave the same as a controller in your main app. This is very similar to adding a model.
+This section describes how to add a controller named 'woodpeckers' to your plugin that will behave the same as a controller in your main app. This is very similar to adding a model.
You can test your plugin's controller as you would test any other controller:
@@ -661,7 +661,7 @@ class WoodpeckersControllerTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
end
</ruby>
-This is just a simple test to make sure the controller is being loaded correctly. After watching it fail with +rake+, you can make it pass like so:
+This is just a simple test to make sure the controller is being loaded correctly. After watching it fail with +rake+, you can make it pass like so:
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/lib/yaffle.rb:*
@@ -686,11 +686,11 @@ class WoodpeckersController < ActionController::Base
end
</ruby>
-Now your test should be passing, and you should be able to use the Woodpeckers controller in your app. If you add a route for the woodpeckers controller you can start up your server and go to http://localhost:3000/woodpeckers to see your controller in action.
+Now your test should be passing, and you should be able to use the Woodpeckers controller in your app. If you add a route for the woodpeckers controller you can start up your server and go to http://localhost:3000/woodpeckers to see your controller in action.
h3. Helpers
-This section describes how to add a helper named 'WoodpeckersHelper' to your plugin that will behave the same as a helper in your main app. This is very similar to adding a model and a controller.
+This section describes how to add a helper named 'WoodpeckersHelper' to your plugin that will behave the same as a helper in your main app. This is very similar to adding a model and a controller.
You can test your plugin's helper as you would test any other helper:
@@ -707,7 +707,7 @@ class WoodpeckersHelperTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
end
</ruby>
-This is just a simple test to make sure the helper is being loaded correctly. After watching it fail with +rake+, you can make it pass like so:
+This is just a simple test to make sure the helper is being loaded correctly. After watching it fail with +rake+, you can make it pass like so:
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/lib/yaffle.rb:*
@@ -736,9 +736,9 @@ Now your test should be passing, and you should be able to use the Woodpeckers h
h3. Routes
-In a standard 'routes.rb' file you use routes like 'map.connect' or 'map.resources'. You can add your own custom routes from a plugin. This section will describe how to add a custom method called that can be called with 'map.yaffles'.
+You can add your own custom routes from a plugin. This section will describe how to add a custom method that can be called with 'map.yaffles'.
-Testing routes from plugins is slightly different from testing routes in a standard rails application. To begin, add a test like this:
+Testing routes from plugins is slightly different from testing routes in a standard Rails application. To begin, add a test like this:
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/test/routing_test.rb*
@@ -802,20 +802,20 @@ You can also see if your routes work by running +rake routes+ from your app dire
h3. Generators
-Many plugins ship with generators. When you created the plugin above, you specified the +--generator+ option, so you already have the generator stubs in 'vendor/plugins/yaffle/generators/yaffle'.
+Many plugins ship with generators. When you created the plugin above, you specified the +--generator+ option, so you already have the generator stubs in 'vendor/plugins/yaffle/generators/yaffle'.
Building generators is a complex topic unto itself and this section will cover one small aspect of generators: generating a simple text file.
h4. Testing Generators
-Many rails plugin authors do not test their generators, however testing generators is quite simple. A typical generator test does the following:
+Many rails plugin authors do not test their generators, however testing generators is quite simple. A typical generator test does the following:
* Creates a new fake rails root directory that will serve as destination
* Runs the generator
* Asserts that the correct files were generated
* Removes the fake rails root
-This section will describe how to create a simple generator that adds a file. For the generator in this section, the test could look something like this:
+This section will describe how to create a simple generator that adds a file. For the generator in this section, the test could look something like this:
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/test/definition_generator_test.rb*
@@ -854,7 +854,7 @@ class DefinitionGeneratorTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
end
</ruby>
-You can run 'rake' from the plugin directory to see this fail. Unless you are doing more advanced generator commands it typically suffices to just test the Generate script, and trust that rails will handle the Destroy and Update commands for you.
+You can run 'rake' from the plugin directory to see this fail. Unless you are doing more advanced generator commands it typically suffices to just test the Generate script, and trust that rails will handle the Destroy and Update commands for you.
To make it pass, create the generator:
@@ -872,9 +872,9 @@ end
h4. The +USAGE+ File
-If you plan to distribute your plugin, developers will expect at least a minimum of documentation. You can add simple documentation to the generator by updating the USAGE file.
+If you plan to distribute your plugin, developers will expect at least a minimum of documentation. You can add simple documentation to the generator by updating the USAGE file.
-Rails ships with several built-in generators. You can see all of the generators available to you by typing the following at the command line:
+Rails ships with several built-in generators. You can see all of the generators available to you by typing the following at the command line:
<shell>
rails generate
@@ -899,9 +899,9 @@ Description:
h3. Add a Custom Generator Command
-You may have noticed above that you can used one of the built-in rails migration commands +migration_template+. If your plugin needs to add and remove lines of text from existing files you will need to write your own generator methods.
+You may have noticed above that you can used one of the built-in rails migration commands +migration_template+. If your plugin needs to add and remove lines of text from existing files you will need to write your own generator methods.
-This section describes how you you can create your own commands to add and remove a line of text from 'routes.rb'. This example creates a very simple method that adds or removes a text file.
+This section describes how you you can create your own commands to add and remove a line of text from 'routes.rb'. This example creates a very simple method that adds or removes a text file.
To start, add the following test method:
@@ -985,7 +985,7 @@ end
h3. Generator Commands
-You may have noticed above that you can used one of the built-in rails migration commands +migration_template+. If your plugin needs to add and remove lines of text from existing files you will need to write your own generator methods.
+You may have noticed above that you can used one of the built-in rails migration commands +migration_template+. If your plugin needs to add and remove lines of text from existing files you will need to write your own generator methods.
This section describes how you you can create your own commands to add and remove a line of text from 'config/routes.rb'.
@@ -1125,9 +1125,9 @@ NOTE: If you haven't set up the custom route from above, 'rails destroy' will fa
h3. Migrations
-If your plugin requires changes to the app's database you will likely want to somehow add migrations. Rails does not include any built-in support for calling migrations from plugins, but you can still make it easy for developers to call migrations from plugins.
+If your plugin requires changes to the app's database you will likely want to somehow add migrations. Rails does not include any built-in support for calling migrations from plugins, but you can still make it easy for developers to call migrations from plugins.
-If you have a very simple needs, like creating a table that will always have the same name and columns, then you can use a more simple solution, like creating a custom rake task or method. If your migration needs user input to supply table names or other options, you probably want to opt for generating a migration.
+If you have a very simple needs, like creating a table that will always have the same name and columns, then you can use a more simple solution, like creating a custom rake task or method. If your migration needs user input to supply table names or other options, you probably want to opt for generating a migration.
Let's say you have the following migration in your plugin:
@@ -1199,12 +1199,12 @@ NOTE: several plugin frameworks such as Desert and Engines provide more advanced
h4. Generate Migrations
-Generating migrations has several advantages over other methods. Namely, you can allow other developers to more easily customize the migration. The flow looks like this:
+Generating migrations has several advantages over other methods. Namely, you can allow other developers to more easily customize the migration. The flow looks like this:
* call your rails generate script and pass in whatever options they need
* examine the generated migration, adding/removing columns or other options as necessary
-This example will demonstrate how to use one of the built-in generator methods named 'migration_template' to create a migration file. Extending the rails migration generator requires a somewhat intimate knowledge of the migration generator internals, so it's best to write a test first:
+This example will demonstrate how to use one of the built-in generator methods named 'migration_template' to create a migration file. Extending the rails migration generator requires a somewhat intimate knowledge of the migration generator internals, so it's best to write a test first:
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/test/yaffle_migration_generator_test.rb*
@@ -1254,7 +1254,7 @@ class MigrationGeneratorTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
end
</ruby>
-NOTE: the migration generator checks to see if a migation already exists, and it's hard-coded to check the 'db/migrate' directory. As a result, if your test tries to generate a migration that already exists in the app, it will fail. The easy workaround is to make sure that the name you generate in your test is very unlikely to actually appear in the app.
+NOTE: The migration generator checks to see if a migration already exists, and it's hard-coded to check the +db/migrate+ directory. As a result, if your test tries to generate a migration that already exists in the app, it will fail. The easy workaround is to make sure that the name you generate in your test is very unlikely to actually appear in the app.
After running the test with 'rake' you can make it pass with:
@@ -1288,9 +1288,9 @@ class YaffleMigrationGenerator < Rails::Generator::NamedBase
end
</ruby>
-The generator creates a new file in 'db/migrate' with a timestamp and an 'add_column' statement. It reuses the built-in rails +migration_template+ method, and reuses the built-in rails migration template.
+The generator creates a new file in 'db/migrate' with a timestamp and an 'add_column' statement. It reuses the built-in Rails +migration_template+ method, and reuses the built-in rails migration template.
-It's courteous to check to see if table names are being pluralized whenever you create a generator that needs to be aware of table names. This way people using your generator won't have to manually change the generated files if they've turned pluralization off.
+It's courteous to check to see if table names are being pluralized whenever you create a generator that needs to be aware of table names. This way people using your generator won't have to manually change the generated files if they've turned pluralization off.
To run the generator, type the following at the command line:
@@ -1314,9 +1314,9 @@ class AddYaffleFieldsToBirds < ActiveRecord::Migration
end
</ruby>
-h3. Rake tasks
+h3. Rake Tasks
-When you created the plugin with the built-in rails generator, it generated a rake file for you in 'vendor/plugins/yaffle/tasks/yaffle_tasks.rake'. Any rake task you add here will be available to the app.
+When you created the plugin with the built-in rails generator, it generated a rake file for you in 'vendor/plugins/yaffle/tasks/yaffle_tasks.rake'. Any rake task you add here will be available to the app.
Many plugin authors put all of their rake tasks into a common namespace that is the same as the plugin, like so:
@@ -1343,11 +1343,11 @@ Note that tasks from +vendor/plugins/yaffle/Rakefile+ are not available to the m
h3. Plugins as Gems
-Turning your rails plugin into a gem is a simple and straightforward task. This section will cover how to turn your plugin into a gem. It will not cover how to distribute that gem.
+Turning your rails plugin into a gem is a simple and straightforward task. This section will cover how to turn your plugin into a gem. It will not cover how to distribute that gem.
Rails 3 ignores both <tt>init.rb</tt> and <tt>rails/init.rb</tt> file of a gem. Also, the name of the plugin now is relevant since +config.gem+ tries to load it. Either name the main file after your gem, or document that users should use the +:lib+ option.
-It's common practice to put any developer-centric rake tasks (such as tests, rdoc and gem package tasks) in +Rakefile+. A rake task that packages the gem might look like this:
+It's common practice to put any developer-centric rake tasks (such as tests, rdoc and gem package tasks) in +Rakefile+. A rake task that packages the gem might look like this:
* *vendor/plugins/yaffle/Rakefile:*
@@ -1395,14 +1395,14 @@ h3. RDoc Documentation
Once your plugin is stable and you are ready to deploy do everyone else a favor and document it! Luckily, writing documentation for your plugin is easy.
-The first step is to update the README file with detailed information about how to use your plugin. A few key things to include are:
+The first step is to update the README file with detailed information about how to use your plugin. A few key things to include are:
* Your name
* How to install
* How to add the functionality to the app (several examples of common use cases)
* Warning, gotchas or tips that might help save users time
-Once your README is solid, go through and add rdoc comments to all of the methods that developers will use. It's also customary to add '#:nodoc:' comments to those parts of the code that are not part of the public api.
+Once your README is solid, go through and add rdoc comments to all of the methods that developers will use. It's also customary to add '#:nodoc:' comments to those parts of the code that are not part of the public api.
Once your comments are good to go, navigate to your plugin directory and run:
@@ -1416,12 +1416,12 @@ If you prefer to use RSpec instead of Test::Unit, you may be interested in the "
h4. References
-* http://nubyonrails.com/articles/the-complete-guide-to-rails-plugins-part-i
-* http://nubyonrails.com/articles/the-complete-guide-to-rails-plugins-part-ii
-* http://github.com/technoweenie/attachment_fu/tree/master
-* http://daddy.platte.name/2007/05/rails-plugins-keep-initrb-thin.html
-* http://www.mbleigh.com/2008/6/11/gemplugins-a-brief-introduction-to-the-future-of-rails-plugins
-* http://weblog.jamisbuck.org/2006/10/26/monkey-patching-rails-extending-routes-2.
+* "Complete Guide to Rails Plugins - Part 1":http://nubyonrails.com/articles/the-complete-guide-to-rails-plugins-part-i
+* "Complete Guide to Rails Plugins - Part 2":http://nubyonrails.com/articles/the-complete-guide-to-rails-plugins-part-ii
+* "Attachment_fu Plugin":http://github.com/technoweenie/attachment_fu/tree/master
+* "Keeping init.rb thin":http://daddy.platte.name/2007/05/rails-plugins-keep-initrb-thin.html
+* "GemPlugins":http://www.mbleigh.com/2008/06/11/gemplugins-a-brief-introduction-to-the-future-of-rails-plugins
+* "Extending Routes":http://weblog.jamisbuck.org/2006/10/26/monkey-patching-rails-extending-routes-2
h4. Contents of +lib/yaffle.rb+
View
18 railties/guides/source/rails_application_templates.textile
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ $ rails new blog -m ~/template.rb
It's also possible to apply a template using a URL :
<shell>
-$ rails new blog -m http://gist.github.com/31208.txt
+$ rails new blog -m https://gist.github.com/755496.txt
</shell>
Alternatively, you can use the rake task +rails:template+ to apply a template to an existing Rails application :
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ Rails templates API is very self explanatory and easy to understand. Here's an e
# template.rb
run "rm public/index.html"
generate(:scaffold, "person name:string")
-route "map.root :controller => 'people'"
+route "root :to => 'people#index'"
rake("db:migrate")
git :init
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ The following sections outlines the primary methods provided by the API :
h4. gem(name, options = {})
-Adds a +config.gem+ entry for the supplied gem to the generated application’s +config/environment.rb+.
+Adds a +gem+ entry for the supplied gem to the generated application’s +Gemfile+.
For example, if your application depends on the gems +bj+ and +nokogiri+ :
@@ -66,6 +66,16 @@ rake "gems:install"
And let Rails take care of installing the required gems if they’re not already installed.
+h4. add_source(source, options = {})
+
+Adds the given source to the generated application's +Gemfile+.
+
+For example, if you need to source a gem from "http://code.whytheluckystiff.net":
+
+<ruby>
+add_source "http://code.whytheluckystiff.net"
+</ruby>
+
h4. plugin(name, options = {})
Installs a plugin to the generated application.
@@ -183,7 +193,7 @@ h4. route(routing_code)
This adds a routing entry to the +config/routes.rb+ file. In above steps, we generated a person scaffold and also removed +public/index.html+. Now to make +PeopleController#index+ as the default page for the application :
<ruby>
-route "map.root :controller => :person"
+route "root :to => 'person#index'"
</ruby>
h4. inside(dir)
View
4 railties/guides/source/rails_on_rack.textile
@@ -223,8 +223,8 @@ h4. Learning Rack
* "Official Rack Website":http://rack.github.com
* "Introducing Rack":http://chneukirchen.org/blog/archive/2007/02/introducing-rack.html
-* "Ruby on Rack #1 - Hello Rack!":http://m.onkey.org/2008/11/17/ruby-on-rack-1
-* "Ruby on Rack #2 - The Builder":http://m.onkey.org/2008/11/18/ruby-on-rack-2-rack-builder
+* "Ruby on Rack #1 - Hello Rack!":http://m.onkey.org/ruby-on-rack-1-hello-rack
+* "Ruby on Rack #2 - The Builder":http://m.onkey.org/ruby-on-rack-2-the-builder
h4. Understanding Middlewares
View
3  railties/guides/source/routing.textile
@@ -85,6 +85,9 @@ creates seven different routes in your application, all mapping to the +Photos+
|PUT |/photos/:id |update |update a specific photo |
|DELETE |/photos/:id |destroy |delete a specific photo |
+
+NOTE: Rails routes are matched in the order they are specified, so if you have a +resources :photos+ above a +get 'photos/poll'+ the +show+ action's route for the +resources+ line will be matched before the +get+ line. To fix this, move the +get+ line *above* the +resources+ line so that it is matched first.
+
h4. Paths and URLs
Creating a resourceful route will also expose a number of helpers to the controllers in your application. In the case of +resources :photos+:
View
10 railties/guides/source/security.textile
@@ -616,7 +616,7 @@ h5(#sql-injection-introduction). Introduction
SQL injection attacks aim at influencing database queries by manipulating web application parameters. A popular goal of SQL injection attacks is to bypass authorization. Another goal is to carry out data manipulation or reading arbitrary data. Here is an example of how not to use user input data in a query:
<ruby>
-Project.find(:all, :conditions => "name = '#{params[:name]}'")
+Project.all(:conditions => "name = '#{params[:name]}'")
</ruby>
This could be in a search action and the user may enter a project's name that he wants to find. If a malicious user enters ' OR 1 --, the resulting SQL query will be:
@@ -632,7 +632,7 @@ h5. Bypassing Authorization
Usually a web application includes access control. The user enters his login credentials, the web application tries to find the matching record in the users table. The application grants access when it finds a record. However, an attacker may possibly bypass this check with SQL injection. The following shows a typical database query in Rails to find the first record in the users table which matches the login credentials parameters supplied by the user.
<ruby>
-User.find(:first, "login = '#{params[:name]}' AND password = '#{params[:password]}'")
+User.first("login = '#{params[:name]}' AND password = '#{params[:password]}'")
</ruby>
If an attacker enters ' OR '1'='1 as the name, and ' OR '2'>'1 as the password, the resulting SQL query will be:
@@ -648,7 +648,7 @@ h5. Unauthorized Reading
The UNION statement connects two SQL queries and returns the data in one set. An attacker can use it to read arbitrary data from the database. Let's take the example from above:
<ruby>
-Project.find(:all, :conditions => "name = '#{params[:name]}'")
+Project.all(:conditions => "name = '#{params[:name]}'")
</ruby>
And now let's inject another query using the UNION statement:
@@ -675,13 +675,13 @@ Ruby on Rails has a built-in filter for special SQL characters, which will escap
Instead of passing a string to the conditions option, you can pass an array to sanitize tainted strings like this:
<ruby>
-Model.find(:first, :conditions => ["login = ? AND password = ?", entered_user_name, entered_password])
+Model.first(:conditions => ["login = ? AND password = ?", entered_user_name, entered_password])
</ruby>
As you can see, the first part of the array is an SQL fragment with question marks. The sanitized versions of the variables in the second part of the array replace the question marks. Or you can pass a hash for the same result:
<ruby>
-Model.find(:first, :conditions => {:login => entered_user_name, :password => entered_password})
+Model.first(:conditions => {:login => entered_user_name, :password => entered_password})
</ruby>
The array or hash form is only available in model instances. You can try +sanitize_sql()+ elsewhere. _(highlight)Make it a habit to think about the security consequences when using an external string in SQL_.
View
4 railties/guides/w3c_validator.rb
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@
#
# Separate many using commas:
#
-# # validates only
+# # validates only association_basics.html and migrations.html
# ONLY=assoc,migrations rake validate_guides
#
# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
@@ -88,4 +88,4 @@ def show_results(error_list)
end
end
-RailsGuides::Validator.new.validate
+RailsGuides::Validator.new.validate
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