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update contributors guide to reflect GitHub use

* outlines how to review pull requests
* outlines how to issue pull requests
* changed all references from LH => GH
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commit 85c8d73642f03410b86ee842edcfe0eba1d4252c 1 parent 9971387
Dan Pickett authored
Showing with 30 additions and 37 deletions.
  1. +30 −37 railties/guides/source/contributing_to_ruby_on_rails.textile
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67 railties/guides/source/contributing_to_ruby_on_rails.textile
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ h2. Contributing to Ruby on Rails
This guide covers ways in which _you_ can become a part of the ongoing development of Ruby on Rails. After reading it, you should be familiar with:
-* Using Lighthouse to report issues
+* Using GitHub to report issues
* Cloning master and running the test suite
* Helping to resolve existing issues
* Contributing to the Ruby on Rails documentation
@@ -14,29 +14,29 @@ endprologue.
h3. Reporting an Issue
-Ruby on Rails uses a "Lighthouse project":http://rails.lighthouseapp.com/projects/8994-ruby-on-rails/ to track issues (primarily bugs and contributions of new code). If you've found a bug in Ruby on Rails, this is the place to start. You'll need to create a (free) Lighthouse account in order to comment on issues or to upload patches.
+Ruby on Rails uses "GitHub Issue Tracking":https://github.com/rails/rails/issues to track issues (primarily bugs and contributions of new code). If you've found a bug in Ruby on Rails, this is the place to start. You'll need to create a (free) GitHub account in order to comment on issues or to upload patches.
NOTE: Bugs in the most recent released version of Ruby on Rails are likely to get the most attention. Also, the Rails core team is always interested in feedback from those who can take the time to test _edge Rails_ (the code for the version of Rails that is currently under development). Later in this guide you'll find out how to get edge Rails for testing.
h4. Creating a Bug Report
-If you've found a problem in Ruby on Rails which is not a security risk do a search in Lighthouse in case it was already reported. If you find no ticket addressing it you can "add a new one":http://rails.lighthouseapp.com/projects/8994-ruby-on-rails/tickets/new. (See the next section for reporting security issues.)
+If you've found a problem in Ruby on Rails which is not a security risk do a search in GitHub Issues in case it was already reported. If you find no issue addressing it you can "add a new one":https://github.com/rails/rails/issues/new. (See the next section for reporting security issues.)
-At the minimum, your ticket needs a title and descriptive text. But that's only a minimum. You should include as much relevant information as possible. You need to at least post the code sample that has the issue. Even better is to include a unit test that shows how the expected behavior is not occurring. Your goal should be to make it easy for yourself - and others - to replicate the bug and figure out a fix.
+At the minimum, your issue report needs a title and descriptive text. But that's only a minimum. You should include as much relevant information as possible. You need to at least post the code sample that has the issue. Even better is to include a unit test that shows how the expected behavior is not occurring. Your goal should be to make it easy for yourself - and others - to replicate the bug and figure out a fix.
You shouldn't assign the bug to a particular core developer unless you know for sure which developer will be handling that issue. The core team periodically reviews issues and assigns developers and milestones to them.
You should set tags for your issue. Use the "bug" tag for a bug report, and add the "patch" tag if you are attaching a patch. Try to find some relevant tags from the existing tag list (which will appear as soon as you start typing in the "Choose some tags" textbox), rather than creating new tags.
-Then don't get your hopes up. Unless you have a "Code Red, Mission Critical, The World is Coming to an End" kind of bug, you're creating this ticket in the hope that others with the same problem will be able to collaborate with you on solving it. Do not expect that the ticket automatically will see any activity or that others will jump to fix it. Creating a ticket like this is mostly to help yourself start on the path of fixing the problem and for others to confirm it with a "I'm having this problem too" comment.
+Then don't get your hopes up. Unless you have a "Code Red, Mission Critical, The World is Coming to an End" kind of bug, you're creating this issue report in the hope that others with the same problem will be able to collaborate with you on solving it. Do not expect that the issue report will automatically see any activity or that others will jump to fix it. Creating a issue like this is mostly to help yourself start on the path of fixing the problem and for others to confirm it with a "I'm having this problem too" comment.
h4. Special Treatment for Security Issues
-WARNING: Please do not report security vulnerabilities on public Lighthouse tickets. The "Rails security policy page":http://rubyonrails.org/security details the procedure to follow for security issues.
+WARNING: Please do not report security vulnerabilities with public GitHub issue reports. The "Rails security policy page":http://rubyonrails.org/security details the procedure to follow for security issues.
h4. What About Feature Requests?
-Please don't put "feature request" tickets into Lighthouse. If there's a new feature that you want to see added to Ruby on Rails, you'll need to write the code yourself - or convince someone else to partner with you to write the code. Later in this guide you'll find detailed instructions for proposing a patch to Ruby on Rails. If you enter a wishlist item in Lighthouse with no code, you can expect it to be marked "invalid" as soon as it's reviewed.
+Please don't put "feature request" items into GitHub Issues. If there's a new feature that you want to see added to Ruby on Rails, you'll need to write the code yourself - or convince someone else to partner with you to write the code. Later in this guide you'll find detailed instructions for proposing a patch to Ruby on Rails. If you enter a wishlist item in GitHub Issues with no code, you can expect it to be marked "invalid" as soon as it's reviewed.
h3. Running the Test Suite
@@ -216,11 +216,11 @@ TIP: You may want to "put your git branch name in your shell prompt":http://qugs
h3. Helping to Resolve Existing Issues
-As a next step beyond reporting issues, you can help the core team resolve existing issues. If you check the "open tickets":https://rails.lighthouseapp.com/projects/8994-ruby-on-rails/tickets?q=state%3Aopen list in Lighthouse, you'll find lots of issues already requiring attention. What can you do for these? Quite a bit, actually:
+As a next step beyond reporting issues, you can help the core team resolve existing issues. If you check the "Everyone's Issues":https://github.com/rails/rails/issues?sort=created&direction=desc&state=open&page=1 list in GitHub Issues, you'll find lots of issues already requiring attention. What can you do for these? Quite a bit, actually:
h4. Verifying Bug Reports
-For starters, it helps to just verify bug reports. Can you reproduce the reported issue on your own computer? If so, you can add a comment to the ticket saying that you're seeing the same thing.
+For starters, it helps to just verify bug reports. Can you reproduce the reported issue on your own computer? If so, you can add a comment to the issue saying that you're seeing the same thing.
If something is very vague, can you help squish it down into something specific? Maybe you can provide additional information to help reproduce a bug, or eliminate needless steps that aren't required to help demonstrate the problem.
@@ -230,26 +230,27 @@ Anything you can do to make bug reports more succinct or easier to reproduce is
h4. Testing Patches
-You can also help out by examining patches that have been submitted to Ruby on Rails via Lighthouse. To apply someone's changes you need to first create a dedicated branch:
+You can also help out by examining pull requests that have been submitted to Ruby on Rails via GitHub. To apply someone's changes you need to first create a dedicated branch:
<shell>
$ git checkout -b testing_branch
</shell>
-Then you can apply their patch:
+Then you can use their remote to update your codebase. For example, let's say the github user JohnSmith has forked and pushed to the master branch located at http://github.com/JohnSmith/rails.
<shell>
-$ git am their-patch-file.diff
+$ git remote add JohnSmith git://github.com/JohnSmith/rails.git
+$ git pull JohnSmith master
</shell>
-After applying a patch, test it out! Here are some things to think about:
+After applying their branch, test it out! Here are some things to think about:
-* Does the patch actually work?
+* Does the change actually work?
* Are you happy with the tests? Can you follow what they're testing? Are there any tests missing?
* Does it have proper documentation coverage? Should documentation elsewhere be updated?
* Do you like the implementation? Can you think of a nicer or faster way to implement a part of their change?
-Once you're happy that the patch contains a good change, comment on the Lighthouse ticket indicating your approval. Your comment should indicate that you like the change and what you like about it. Something like:
+Once you're happy that the pull request contains a good change, comment on the GitHub issue indicating your approval. Your comment should indicate that you like the change and what you like about it. Something like:
<blockquote>
I like the way you've restructured that code in generate_finder_sql, much nicer. The tests look good too.
@@ -261,7 +262,7 @@ h3. Contributing to the Rails Documentation
Ruby on Rails has two main sets of documentation: The guides help you to learn Ruby on Rails, and the API is a reference.
-You can create a ticket in Lighthouse to fix or expand documentation. However, if you're confident about your changes you can push them yourself directly via "docrails":https://github.com/lifo/docrails/tree/master. docrails is a branch with an *open commit policy* and public write access. Commits to docrails are still reviewed, but that happens after they are pushed. docrails is merged with master regularly, so you are effectively editing the Ruby on Rails documentation.
+You can create an issue in GitHub issues to fix or expand documentation. However, if you're confident about your changes you can push them yourself directly via "docrails":https://github.com/lifo/docrails/tree/master. docrails is a branch with an *open commit policy* and public write access. Commits to docrails are still reviewed, but that happens after they are pushed. docrails is merged with master regularly, so you are effectively editing the Ruby on Rails documentation.
When working with documentation, please take into account the "API Documentation Guidelines":api_documentation_guidelines.html and the "Ruby on Rails Guides Guidelines":ruby_on_rails_guides_guidelines.html.
@@ -314,10 +315,6 @@ You should not be the only person who looks at the code before you submit it. Yo
You might also want to check out the "RailsBridge BugMash":http://wiki.railsbridge.org/projects/railsbridge/wiki/BugMash as a way to get involved in a group effort to improve Rails. This can help you get started and help check your code when you're writing your first patches.
-h4. Create a Lighthouse Ticket
-
-Now create a ticket for your patch. Go to the "new ticket":http://rails.lighthouseapp.com/projects/8994-ruby-on-rails/tickets/new page at Lighthouse. Fill in a reasonable title and description, as well as tag the ticket with the ‘patch’ tag and whatever other subject area tags make sense. Write down your ticket number, for you will need it in the following step.
-
h4. Commit Your Changes
When you're happy with the code on your computer, you need to commit the changes to git:
@@ -346,33 +343,29 @@ $ git rebase master
No conflicts? Tests still pass? Change still seems reasonable to you? Then move on.
-h4. Create a Patch
-
-Now you can create a patch file to share with other developers (and with the core team). Still in your branch, run
+h4. Fork
-<shell>
-$ git commit -a
-$ git format-patch master --stdout > my_new_patch.diff
-</shell>
+Navigate to the Rails "GitHub repository":https://github.com/rails/rails and press "Fork" in the upper right hand corner.
-Open the diff file in your text editor of choice to sanity check the results, and make sure that no unintended changes crept in.
-
-You can also perform an extra check by applying the patch to a different dedicated branch:
+Add the new remote to your local repository on your local machine:
<shell>
-$ git checkout -b testing_branch
-$ git apply --check my_new_patch.diff
+$ git remote add mine https://&lt;your user name&gt;@github.com/&lt;your user name&gt;/rails.git
</shell>
-Please make sure the patch does not introduce whitespace errors:
+Push to your remote:
<shell>
-$ git apply --whitespace=error-all my_new_patch.diff
+$ git push mine master
</shell>
-h4. Attach your Patch to the Lighthouse Ticket
+h4. Issue a Pull Request
-Now you need to update the ticket by attaching the patch file you just created.
+Navigate to the Rails repository you just pushed to (e.g. https://github.com/&lt;your user name&gt;/rails) and press "Pull Request" in the upper right hand corner.
+
+Ensure the changesets you introduced are included in the "Commits" tab and that the "Files Changed" incorporate all of your changes.
+
+Fill in some details about your potential patch including a meaningful title. When finished, press "Send pull request." Rails Core will be notified about your submission.
h4. Get Some Feedback
@@ -390,9 +383,9 @@ All contributions, either via master or docrails, get credit in "Rails Contribut
h3. Changelog
+* April 29, 2011: Reflect GitHub Issues and Pull Request workflow by "Dan Pickett":http://www.enlightsolutions.com
* April 14, 2001: Modified Contributing to the Rails Code section to add '[#ticket_number state:commited]' on patches commit messages by "Sebastian Martinez":http://wyeworks.com
* December 28, 2010: Complete revision by "Xavier Noria":credits.html#fxn
* April 6, 2010: Fixed document to validate XHTML 1.0 Strict. "Jaime Iniesta":http://jaimeiniesta.com
* August 1, 2009: Updates/amplifications by "Mike Gunderloy":credits.html#mgunderloy
* March 2, 2009: Initial draft by "Mike Gunderloy":credits.html#mgunderloy
-
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