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Spelling corrections in the guides.

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commit 91b19186f7161bc2114613b15460fb29d632aff7 1 parent ace7508
Evan Farrar evanfarrar authored
2  railties/guides/source/ajax_on_rails.textile
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@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ link_to_remote "Add to cart",
If the server returns 200, the output of the above example is equivalent to our first, simple one. However, in case of error, the element with the DOM id +error+ is updated rather than the +cart+ element.
-** *position* By default (i.e. when not specifying this option, like in the examples before) the repsonse is injected into the element with the specified DOM id, replacing the original content of the element (if there was any). You might want to alter this behavior by keeping the original content - the only question is where to place the new content? This can specified by the +position+ parameter, with four possibilities:
+** *position* By default (i.e. when not specifying this option, like in the examples before) the response is injected into the element with the specified DOM id, replacing the original content of the element (if there was any). You might want to alter this behavior by keeping the original content - the only question is where to place the new content? This can specified by the +position+ parameter, with four possibilities:
*** +:before+ Inserts the response text just before the target element. More precisely, it creates a text node from the response and inserts it as the left sibling of the target element.
*** +:after+ Similar behavior to +:before+, but in this case the response is inserted after the target element.
*** +:top+ Inserts the text into the target element, before it's original content. If the target element was empty, this is equivalent with not specifying +:position+ at all.
8 railties/guides/source/asset_pipeline.textile
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@@ -4,8 +4,8 @@ This guide will cover the ideology of the asset pipeline introduced in Rails 3.1
By referring to this guide you will be able to:
* Properly organize your application assets
-* Understand the benefits of the asset pipline
-* Adding a preproccessor to the pipeline
+* Understand the benefits of the asset pipeline
+* Adding a preprocessor to the pipeline
* Package assets with a gem
endprologue.
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ h4. Default Files Loaded
h4. Directives
-h4. Stacking Preproccessors
+h4. Stacking Preprocessors
h3. Packaging Assets with Your Gems
@@ -32,4 +32,4 @@ You may find it useful to package certain assets with your gem. A simple example
h3. More on Sprockets
-Sprockets is the engine that handles the asset pipeline in Rails 3.1 and above. Their offical website is available at "http://getsprockets.org/":http://getsprockets.org/ and the source code is "on github":https://github.com/sstephenson/sprockets.
+Sprockets is the engine that handles the asset pipeline in Rails 3.1 and above. Their official website is available at "http://getsprockets.org/":http://getsprockets.org/ and the source code is "on github":https://github.com/sstephenson/sprockets.
2  railties/guides/source/contribute.textile
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@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ h3. How to Contribute?
* Sample format : "Active Record Associations":https://github.com/lifo/docrails/blob/3e56a3832415476fdd1cb963980d0ae390ac1ed3/railties/guides/source/association_basics.textile.
* Sample output : "Active Record Associations":association_basics.html.
* You can build the Guides during testing by running +bundle exec rake generate_guides+ in the +railties+ directory.
-* You're encouraged to validate XHTML for the generated guides before commiting your changes by running +bundle exec rake validate_guides+ in the +railties+ directory.
+* You're encouraged to validate XHTML for the generated guides before committing your changes by running +bundle exec rake validate_guides+ in the +railties+ directory.
* Edge guides "can be consulted online":http://edgeguides.rubyonrails.org/. That website is generated periodically from docrails.
h3. What to Contribute?
2  railties/guides/source/contributing_to_ruby_on_rails.textile
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@@ -309,7 +309,7 @@ Rails follows a simple set of coding style conventions.
* a = b and not a=b.
* Follow the conventions you see used in the source already.
-These are some guidelines and please use your best judgement in using them.
+These are some guidelines and please use your best judgment in using them.
h4. Sanity Check
2  railties/guides/source/form_helpers.textile
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@@ -545,7 +545,7 @@ NOTE: In many cases the built-in date pickers are clumsy as they do not aid the
h4. Individual Components
-Occasionally you need to display just a single date component such as a year or a month. Rails provides a series of helpers for this, one for each component +select_year+, +select_month+, +select_day+, +select_hour+, +select_minute+, +select_second+. These helpers are fairly straightforward. By default they will generate an input field named after the time component (for example "year" for +select_year+, "month" for +select_month+ etc.) although this can be overriden with the +:field_name+ option. The +:prefix+ option works in the same way that it does for +select_date+ and +select_time+ and has the same default value.
+Occasionally you need to display just a single date component such as a year or a month. Rails provides a series of helpers for this, one for each component +select_year+, +select_month+, +select_day+, +select_hour+, +select_minute+, +select_second+. These helpers are fairly straightforward. By default they will generate an input field named after the time component (for example "year" for +select_year+, "month" for +select_month+ etc.) although this can be overridden with the +:field_name+ option. The +:prefix+ option works in the same way that it does for +select_date+ and +select_time+ and has the same default value.
The first parameter specifies which value should be selected and can either be an instance of a Date, Time or DateTime, in which case the relevant component will be extracted, or a numerical value. For example
2  railties/guides/source/initialization.textile
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@@ -865,7 +865,7 @@ This method collects the initializers from the ancestors of this class and adds
end
</ruby>
-So this <tt>+</tt> method is overriden to return a new collection comprising of the existing collection as an array and then using the <tt>Array#+</tt> method combines these two collections, returning a "super" +Collection+ object. In this case, the only initializer that's going to be in this new +Collection+ object is the +i18n.callbacks+ initializer.
+So this <tt>+</tt> method is overridden to return a new collection comprising of the existing collection as an array and then using the <tt>Array#+</tt> method combines these two collections, returning a "super" +Collection+ object. In this case, the only initializer that's going to be in this new +Collection+ object is the +i18n.callbacks+ initializer.
The next method to be called after this +initializer+ method is the +after_initialize+ method on the +config+ object, which is defined like this:
2  railties/guides/source/layouts_and_rendering.textile
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@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ Cache-Control: no-cache
$
</shell>
-We see there is an empty response (no data after the +Cache-Control+ line), but the request was successful because Rails has set the response to 200 OK. You can set the +:status+ option on render to change this response. Rendering nothing can be useful for AJAX requests where all you want to send back to the browser is an acknowledgement that the request was completed.
+We see there is an empty response (no data after the +Cache-Control+ line), but the request was successful because Rails has set the response to 200 OK. You can set the +:status+ option on render to change this response. Rendering nothing can be useful for AJAX requests where all you want to send back to the browser is an acknowledgment that the request was completed.
TIP: You should probably be using the +head+ method, discussed later in this guide, instead of +render :nothing+. This provides additional flexibility and makes it explicit that you're only generating HTTP headers.
2  railties/guides/source/performance_testing.textile
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@@ -276,7 +276,7 @@ measurement,created_at,app,rails,ruby,platform
h5(#output-profiling). Profiling
-In profiling mode, performance tests can generate multiple types of outputs. The command line output is always presented but support for the others is dependant on the interpreter in use. A brief description of each type and their availability across interpreters is given below.
+In profiling mode, performance tests can generate multiple types of outputs. The command line output is always presented but support for the others is dependent on the interpreter in use. A brief description of each type and their availability across interpreters is given below.
h6. Command Line
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