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Fix egregious error in documenting :class_name

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1 parent 5bd6f58 commit a00f9a649c52eb26d3998641e72362a9ac2bb907 @ffmike ffmike committed with karmi Oct 11, 2008
Showing with 17 additions and 17 deletions.
  1. +17 −17 railties/doc/guides/activerecord/association_basics.txt
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34 railties/doc/guides/activerecord/association_basics.txt
@@ -354,8 +354,8 @@ In designing a data model, you will sometimes find a model that should have a re
[source, ruby]
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class Employee < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_many :subordinates, :class_name => :user, :foreign_key => "manager_id"
- belongs_to :manager, :class_name => :user
+ has_many :subordinates, :class_name => "User", :foreign_key => "manager_id"
+ belongs_to :manager, :class_name => "User"
end
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@@ -636,12 +636,12 @@ The +belongs_to+ association supports these options:
//
===== +:class_name+
-If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if an order belongs to a customer, but the actual name of the model containing customers is patron, you'd set things up this way:
+If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if an order belongs to a customer, but the actual name of the model containing customers is +Patron+, you'd set things up this way:
[source, ruby]
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class Order < ActiveRecord::Base
- belongs_to :customer, :class_name => :patron
+ belongs_to :customer, :class_name => "Patron"
end
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@@ -711,7 +711,7 @@ By convention, Rails guesses that the column used to hold the foreign key on thi
[source, ruby]
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class Order < ActiveRecord::Base
- belongs_to :customer, :class_name => :patron, :foreign_key => "patron_id"
+ belongs_to :customer, :class_name => "Patron", :foreign_key => "patron_id"
end
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@@ -863,7 +863,7 @@ In many situations, you can use the default behavior of +has_one+ without any cu
[source, ruby]
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class Supplier < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_one :account, :class_name => :billing, :dependent => :nullify
+ has_one :account, :class_name => "Billing", :dependent => :nullify
end
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@@ -895,12 +895,12 @@ Setting the +:as+ option indicates that this is a polymorphic association. Polym
===== +:class_name+
-If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if a supplier has an account, but the actual name of the model containing accounts is billing, you'd set things up this way:
+If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if a supplier has an account, but the actual name of the model containing accounts is Billing, you'd set things up this way:
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
class Supplier < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_one :account, :class_name => :billing
+ has_one :account, :class_name => "Billing"
end
-------------------------------------------------------
@@ -1205,12 +1205,12 @@ Setting the +:as+ option indicates that this is a polymorphic association, as di
===== +:class_name+
-If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if a customer has many orders, but the actual name of the model containing orders is transactions, you'd set things up this way:
+If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if a customer has many orders, but the actual name of the model containing orders is +Transaction+, you'd set things up this way:
[source, ruby]
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class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_many :orders, :class_name => :transaction
+ has_many :orders, :class_name => "Transaction"
end
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@@ -1221,7 +1221,7 @@ The +:conditions+ option lets you specify the conditions that the associated obj
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_many :confirmed_orders, :class_name => :orders, :conditions => "confirmed = 1"
+ has_many :confirmed_orders, :class_name => "Order", :conditions => "confirmed = 1"
end
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@@ -1230,7 +1230,7 @@ You can also set conditions via a hash:
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_many :confirmed_orders, :class_name => :orders, :conditions => { :confirmed => true }
+ has_many :confirmed_orders, :class_name => "Order", :conditions => { :confirmed => true }
end
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@@ -1321,7 +1321,7 @@ The +:limit+ option lets you restrict the total number of objects that will be f
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
class Customer < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_many :recent_orders, :class_name => :orders, :order => "order_date DESC", :limit => 100
+ has_many :recent_orders, :class_name => "Order", :order => "order_date DESC", :limit => 100
end
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@@ -1591,19 +1591,19 @@ TIP: The +:foreign_key+ and +:association_foreign_key+ options are useful when s
[source, ruby]
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class User < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_and_belongs_to_many :friends, :class_name => :users,
+ has_and_belongs_to_many :friends, :class_name => "User",
:foreign_key => "this_user_id", :association_foreign_key => "other_user_id"
end
-------------------------------------------------------
===== +:class_name+
-If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if a part has many assemblies, but the actual name of the model containing assemblies is gadgets, you'd set things up this way:
+If the name of the other model cannot be derived from the association name, you can use the +:class_name+ option to supply the model name. For example, if a part has many assemblies, but the actual name of the model containing assemblies is +Gadget+, you'd set things up this way:
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
class Parts < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_and_belongs_to_many :assemblies, :class_name => :gadgets
+ has_and_belongs_to_many :assemblies, :class_name => "Gadget"
end
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@@ -1654,7 +1654,7 @@ By convention, Rails guesses that the column in the join table used to hold the
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------------------------
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
- has_and_belongs_to_many :friends, :class_name => :users,
+ has_and_belongs_to_many :friends, :class_name => "User",
:foreign_key => "this_user_id", :association_foreign_key => "other_user_id"
end
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