Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP
Browse files

Grammatical and whitespace fixes for form helper docs. Closes #10062

…[chuyeow]

git-svn-id: http://svn-commit.rubyonrails.org/rails/trunk@8080 5ecf4fe2-1ee6-0310-87b1-e25e094e27de
  • Loading branch information...
commit aa1313dd3b754e5786117578ea4dd62c0f3b09da 1 parent 7e6bb82
@NZKoz NZKoz authored
Showing with 42 additions and 43 deletions.
  1. +42 −43 actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/form_helper.rb
View
85 actionpack/lib/action_view/helpers/form_helper.rb
@@ -4,20 +4,19 @@
module ActionView
module Helpers
- # Form helpers are designed to make working with models much easier than just standard html elements by
- # providing a set of methods for creating forms based on your models. This helper generates the HTML for forms,
- # providing a method for each sort of input (e.g., text, password, select, and so on). When the form is
- # submitted (i.e., when the user hits the submit button or <tt>form.submit</tt> is called via JavaScript), the form
- # inputs will be bundled into the <tt>params</tt> object and passed back to the controller.
+ # Form helpers are designed to make working with models much easier compared to using just standard HTML
+ # elements by providing a set of methods for creating forms based on your models. This helper generates the HTML
+ # for forms, providing a method for each sort of input (e.g., text, password, select, and so on). When the form
+ # is submitted (i.e., when the user hits the submit button or <tt>form.submit</tt> is called via JavaScript), the form inputs will be bundled into the <tt>params</tt> object and passed back to the controller.
#
- # There are two types of form helpers: those that specifically work with model attributes and those that don't.
+ # There are two types of form helpers: those that specifically work with model attributes and those that don't.
# This helper deals with those that work with model attributes; to see an example of form helpers that don't work
# with model attributes, check the ActionView::Helpers::FormTagHelper documentation.
#
- # The core method of this helper, form_for, gives you the ability to create a form for a model instance;
+ # The core method of this helper, form_for, gives you the ability to create a form for a model instance;
# for example, let's say that you have a model <tt>Person</tt> and want to create a new instance of it:
#
- # # Note: a @person variable will have been created in the controller.
+ # # Note: a @person variable will have been created in the controller.
# # For example: @person = Person.new
# <% form_for :person, @person, :url => { :action => "create" } do |f| %>
# <%= f.text_field :first_name %>
@@ -36,15 +35,15 @@ module Helpers
# The <tt>params</tt> object created when this form is submitted would look like:
#
# {"action"=>"create", "controller"=>"persons", "person"=>{"first_name"=>"William", "last_name"=>"Smith"}}
- #
+ #
# The params hash has a nested <tt>person</tt> value, which can therefore be accessed with <tt>params[:person]</tt> in the controller.
# If were editing/updating an instance (e.g., <tt>Person.find(1)</tt> rather than <tt>Person.new</tt> in the controller), the objects
# attribute values are filled into the form (e.g., the <tt>person_first_name</tt> field would have that person's first name in it).
- #
+ #
# If the object name contains square brackets the id for the object will be inserted. For example:
#
# <%= text_field "person[]", "name" %>
- #
+ #
# ...will generate the following ERb.
#
# <input type="text" id="person_<%= @person.id %>_name" name="person[<%= @person.id %>][name]" value="<%= @person.name %>" />
@@ -62,7 +61,7 @@ module Helpers
# link:classes/ActionView/Helpers/DateHelper.html, and link:classes/ActionView/Helpers/ActiveRecordHelper.html
module FormHelper
# Creates a form and a scope around a specific model object that is used as a base for questioning about
- # values for the fields.
+ # values for the fields.
#
# <% form_for :person, @person, :url => { :action => "update" } do |f| %>
# First name: <%= f.text_field :first_name %>
@@ -71,13 +70,13 @@ module FormHelper
# Admin? : <%= f.check_box :admin %>
# <% end %>
#
- # Worth noting is that the form_for tag is called in a ERb evaluation block, not an ERb output block. So that's <tt><% %></tt>,
+ # Worth noting is that the form_for tag is called in a ERb evaluation block, not an ERb output block. So that's <tt><% %></tt>,
# not <tt><%= %></tt>. Also worth noting is that form_for yields a <tt>form_builder</tt> object, in this example as <tt>f</tt>, which emulates
# the API for the stand-alone FormHelper methods, but without the object name. So instead of <tt>text_field :person, :name</tt>,
- # you get away with <tt>f.text_field :name</tt>.
+ # you get away with <tt>f.text_field :name</tt>.
#
- # Even further, the form_for method allows you to more easily escape the instance variable convention. So while the stand-alone
- # approach would require <tt>text_field :person, :name, :object => person</tt>
+ # Even further, the form_for method allows you to more easily escape the instance variable convention. So while the stand-alone
+ # approach would require <tt>text_field :person, :name, :object => person</tt>
# to work with local variables instead of instance ones, the form_for calls remain the same. You simply declare once with
# <tt>:person, person</tt> and all subsequent field calls save <tt>:person</tt> and <tt>:object => person</tt>.
#
@@ -91,11 +90,11 @@ module FormHelper
# Admin? : <%= check_box_tag "person[admin]", @person.company.admin? %>
# <% end %>
#
- # Note: This also works for the methods in FormOptionHelper and DateHelper that are designed to work with an object as base.
- # Like FormOptionHelper#collection_select and DateHelper#datetime_select.
+ # Note: This also works for the methods in FormOptionHelper and DateHelper that are designed to work with an object as base,
+ # like FormOptionHelper#collection_select and DateHelper#datetime_select.
#
# HTML attributes for the form tag can be given as :html => {...}. For example:
- #
+ #
# <% form_for :person, @person, :html => {:id => 'person_form'} do |f| %>
# ...
# <% end %>
@@ -145,15 +144,15 @@ module FormHelper
# === Customized form builders
#
# You can also build forms using a customized FormBuilder class. Subclass FormBuilder and override or define some more helpers,
- # then use your custom builder. For example, let's say you made a helper to automatically add labels to form inputs.
- #
+ # then use your custom builder. For example, let's say you made a helper to automatically add labels to form inputs.
+ #
# <% form_for :person, @person, :url => { :action => "update" }, :builder => LabellingFormBuilder do |f| %>
# <%= f.text_field :first_name %>
# <%= f.text_field :last_name %>
# <%= text_area :person, :biography %>
# <%= check_box_tag "person[admin]", @person.company.admin? %>
# <% end %>
- #
+ #
# In many cases you will want to wrap the above in another helper, so you could do something like the following:
#
# def labelled_form_for(name, object, options, &proc)
@@ -188,7 +187,7 @@ def form_for(record_or_name_or_array, *args, &proc)
def apply_form_for_options!(object_or_array, options) #:nodoc:
object = object_or_array.is_a?(Array) ? object_or_array.last : object_or_array
-
+
html_options =
if object.respond_to?(:new_record?) && object.new_record?
{ :class => dom_class(object, :new), :id => dom_id(object), :method => :post }
@@ -208,7 +207,7 @@ def apply_form_for_options!(object_or_array, options) #:nodoc:
# <% form_for :person, @person, :url => { :action => "update" } do |person_form| %>
# First name: <%= person_form.text_field :first_name %>
# Last name : <%= person_form.text_field :last_name %>
- #
+ #
# <% fields_for :permission, @person.permission do |permission_fields| %>
# Admin? : <%= permission_fields.check_box :admin %>
# <% end %>
@@ -228,7 +227,7 @@ def fields_for(object_name, *args, &block)
# Returns a label tag tailored for labelling an input field for a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). The text of label will default to the attribute name unless you specify
# it explicitly. Additional options on the label tag can be passed as a hash with +options+. These options will be tagged
- # onto the html as an HTML element attribute as in the example shown.
+ # onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example shown.
#
# ==== Examples
# label(:post, :title)
@@ -246,7 +245,7 @@ def label(object_name, method, text = nil, options = {})
# Returns an input tag of the "text" type tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
- # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the html as an HTML element attribute as in the example
+ # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown.
#
# ==== Examples
@@ -268,7 +267,7 @@ def text_field(object_name, method, options = {})
# Returns an input tag of the "password" type tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
- # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the html as an HTML element attribute as in the example
+ # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown.
#
# ==== Examples
@@ -290,7 +289,7 @@ def password_field(object_name, method, options = {})
# Returns a hidden input tag tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
- # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the html as an html element attribute as in the example
+ # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown.
#
# ==== Examples
@@ -301,14 +300,14 @@ def password_field(object_name, method, options = {})
# # => <input type="hidden" id="post_tag_list" name="post[tag_list]" value="#{@post.tag_list}" />
#
# hidden_field(:user, :token)
- # # => <input type="hidden" id="user_token" name="user[token]" value="#{@user.token}" />
+ # # => <input type="hidden" id="user_token" name="user[token]" value="#{@user.token}" />
def hidden_field(object_name, method, options = {})
InstanceTag.new(object_name, method, self, nil, options.delete(:object)).to_input_field_tag("hidden", options)
end
# Returns an file upload input tag tailored for accessing a specified attribute (identified by +method+) on an object
# assigned to the template (identified by +object+). Additional options on the input tag can be passed as a
- # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the html as an html element attribute as in the example
+ # hash with +options+. These options will be tagged onto the HTML as an HTML element attribute as in the example
# shown.
#
# ==== Examples
@@ -456,7 +455,7 @@ def to_radio_button_tag(tag_value, options = {})
end
options["checked"] = "checked" if checked
pretty_tag_value = tag_value.to_s.gsub(/\s/, "_").gsub(/\W/, "").downcase
- options["id"] ||= defined?(@auto_index) ?
+ options["id"] ||= defined?(@auto_index) ?
"#{@object_name}_#{@auto_index}_#{@method_name}_#{pretty_tag_value}" :
"#{@object_name}_#{@method_name}_#{pretty_tag_value}"
add_default_name_and_id(options)
@@ -510,11 +509,11 @@ def to_boolean_select_tag(options = {})
tag_text << " selected" if value
tag_text << ">True</option></select>"
end
-
+
def to_content_tag(tag_name, options = {})
content_tag(tag_name, value(object), options)
end
-
+
def object
@object || (@template_object.instance_variable_get("@#{@object_name}") rescue nil)
end
@@ -526,12 +525,12 @@ def value(object)
def value_before_type_cast(object)
self.class.value_before_type_cast(object, @method_name)
end
-
+
class << self
def value(object, method_name)
object.send method_name unless object.nil?
end
-
+
def value_before_type_cast(object, method_name)
unless object.nil?
object.respond_to?(method_name + "_before_type_cast") ?
@@ -539,7 +538,7 @@ def value_before_type_cast(object, method_name)
object.send(method_name)
end
end
-
+
def check_box_checked?(value, checked_value)
case value
when TrueClass, FalseClass
@@ -554,7 +553,7 @@ def check_box_checked?(value, checked_value)
value.to_i != 0
end
end
-
+
def radio_button_checked?(value, checked_value)
value.to_s == checked_value.to_s
end
@@ -604,9 +603,9 @@ class FormBuilder #:nodoc:
attr_accessor :object_name, :object, :options
def initialize(object_name, object, template, options, proc)
- @object_name, @object, @template, @options, @proc = object_name, object, template, options, proc
+ @object_name, @object, @template, @options, @proc = object_name, object, template, options, proc
end
-
+
(field_helpers - %w(label check_box radio_button fields_for)).each do |selector|
src = <<-end_src
def #{selector}(method, options = {})
@@ -628,19 +627,19 @@ def label(method, text = nil, options = {})
def check_box(method, options = {}, checked_value = "1", unchecked_value = "0")
@template.check_box(@object_name, method, options.merge(:object => @object), checked_value, unchecked_value)
end
-
+
def radio_button(method, tag_value, options = {})
@template.radio_button(@object_name, method, tag_value, options.merge(:object => @object))
end
-
+
def error_message_on(method, prepend_text = "", append_text = "", css_class = "formError")
@template.error_message_on(@object, method, prepend_text, append_text, css_class)
- end
+ end
def error_messages(options = {})
@template.error_messages_for(@object_name, options.merge(:object => @object))
end
-
+
def submit(value = "Save changes", options = {})
@template.submit_tag(value, options.reverse_merge(:id => "#{object_name}_submit"))
end
Please sign in to comment.
Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.