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[ci skip] Added alias to CSRF

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1 parent f1764a2 commit ad04c2e0b592b01f4e3b3ec2dcbb799b921a6fff @udaykadaboina udaykadaboina committed
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  1. +2 −2 guides/source/security.md
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4 guides/source/security.md
@@ -150,7 +150,7 @@ Another countermeasure is to _save user-specific properties in the session_, ver
### Session Expiry
-NOTE: _Sessions that never expire extend the time-frame for attacks such as cross-site reference forgery (CSRF), session hijacking and session fixation._
+NOTE: _Sessions that never expire extend the time-frame for attacks such as cross-site request forgery (CSRF), session hijacking and session fixation._
One possibility is to set the expiry time-stamp of the cookie with the session id. However the client can edit cookies that are stored in the web browser so expiring sessions on the server is safer. Here is an example of how to _expire sessions in a database table_. Call `Session.sweep("20 minutes")` to expire sessions that were used longer than 20 minutes ago.
@@ -354,7 +354,7 @@ Having one single place in the admin interface or Intranet, where the input has
Refer to the Injection section for countermeasures against XSS. It is _recommended to use the SafeErb plugin_ also in an Intranet or administration interface.
-**CSRF** Cross-Site Reference Forgery (CSRF) is a gigantic attack method, it allows the attacker to do everything the administrator or Intranet user may do. As you have already seen above how CSRF works, here are a few examples of what attackers can do in the Intranet or admin interface.
+**CSRF** Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF), also known as Cross-Site Reference Forgery (XSRF), is a gigantic attack method, it allows the attacker to do everything the administrator or Intranet user may do. As you have already seen above how CSRF works, here are a few examples of what attackers can do in the Intranet or admin interface.
A real-world example is a [router reconfiguration by CSRF](http://www.h-online.com/security/Symantec-reports-first-active-attack-on-a-DSL-router--/news/102352). The attackers sent a malicious e-mail, with CSRF in it, to Mexican users. The e-mail claimed there was an e-card waiting for them, but it also contained an image tag that resulted in a HTTP-GET request to reconfigure the user's router (which is a popular model in Mexico). The request changed the DNS-settings so that requests to a Mexico-based banking site would be mapped to the attacker's site. Everyone who accessed the banking site through that router saw the attacker's fake web site and had their credentials stolen.

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