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Fix links in AC guide

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1 parent dfc0b1a commit b4da5f67708b2699a21f8bb39f4d10865c1814d4 @toretore toretore committed Oct 7, 2008
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ private
end
---------------------------------
-The method simply stores an error message in the flash and redirects to the login form if the user is not logged in. If a before filter (a filter which is run before the action) renders or redirects, the action will not run. If there are additional filters scheduled to run after the rendering/redirecting filter, they are also cancelled. To use this filter in a controller, use the "before_filter":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Filters/ClassMethods.html#M000704 method:
+The method simply stores an error message in the flash and redirects to the login form if the user is not logged in. If a before filter (a filter which is run before the action) renders or redirects, the action will not run. If there are additional filters scheduled to run after the rendering/redirecting filter, they are also cancelled. To use this filter in a controller, use the link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Filters/ClassMethods.html#M000704[before_filter] method:
[source, ruby]
---------------------------------
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
end
---------------------------------
-In this example, the filter is added to ApplicationController and thus all controllers in the application. This will make everything in the application require the user to be logged in in order to use it. For obvious reasons (the user wouldn't be able to log in in the first place!), not all controllers or actions should require this, so to prevent this filter from running you can use "skip_before_filter":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Filters/ClassMethods.html#M000711 :
+In this example, the filter is added to ApplicationController and thus all controllers in the application. This will make everything in the application require the user to be logged in in order to use it. For obvious reasons (the user wouldn't be able to log in in the first place!), not all controllers or actions should require this, so to prevent this filter from running you can use link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Filters/ClassMethods.html#M000711[skip_before_filter] :
[source, ruby]
---------------------------------
@@ -118,4 +118,4 @@ end
Again, this is not an ideal example for this filter, because it's not run in the scope of the controller but gets it passed as an argument. The filter class has a class method `filter` which gets run before or after the action, depending on if it's a before or after filter. Classes used as around filters can also use the same `filter` method, which will get run in the same way. The method must `yield` to execute the action. Alternatively, it can have both a `before` and an `after` method that are run before and after the action.
-The Rails API documentation has "more information and detail on using filters":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Filters/ClassMethods.html
+The Rails API documentation has link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Filters/ClassMethods.html[more information on using filters].
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
== HTTP Basic Authentication ==
-Rails comes with built-in HTTP Basic authentication. This is an authentication scheme that is supported by the majority of browsers and other HTTP clients. As an example, we will create an administration section which will only be available by entering a username and a password into the browser's HTTP Basic dialog window. Using the built-in authentication is quite easy and only requires you to use one method, "authenticate_or_request_with_http_basic":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/HttpAuthentication/Basic/ControllerMethods.html#M000610
+Rails comes with built-in HTTP Basic authentication. This is an authentication scheme that is supported by the majority of browsers and other HTTP clients. As an example, we will create an administration section which will only be available by entering a username and a password into the browser's HTTP Basic dialog window. Using the built-in authentication is quite easy and only requires you to use one method, link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/HttpAuthentication/Basic/ControllerMethods.html#M000610[authenticate_or_request_with_http_basic].
[source, ruby]
-------------------------------------
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
== Parameter filtering ==
-Rails keeps a log file for each environment (development, test and production) in the "log" folder. These are extremely useful when debugging what's actually going on in your application, but in a live application you may not want every bit of information to be stored in the log file. The "filter_parameter_logging":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Base.html#M000837 method can be used to filter out sensitive information from the log. It works by replacing certain keys in the `params` hash with "[FILTERED]" as they are written to the log. As an example, let's see how to filter all parameters with keys that include "password":
+Rails keeps a log file for each environment (development, test and production) in the "log" folder. These are extremely useful when debugging what's actually going on in your application, but in a live application you may not want every bit of information to be stored in the log file. The link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Base.html#M000837[filter_parameter_logging] method can be used to filter out sensitive information from the log. It works by replacing certain keys in the `params` hash with "[FILTERED]" as they are written to the log. As an example, let's see how to filter all parameters with keys that include "password":
[source, ruby]
-------------------------
@@ -1,10 +1,10 @@
== The request and response objects ==
-In every controller there are two accessor methods pointing to the request and the response objects associated with the request cycle that is currently in execution. The `request` method contains an instance of "AbstractRequest":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/AbstractRequest.html and the `response` method contains the "response object":http://github.com/rails/rails/tree/master/actionpack/lib/action_controller/response.rb representing what is going to be sent back to the client.
+In every controller there are two accessor methods pointing to the request and the response objects associated with the request cycle that is currently in execution. The `request` method contains an instance of link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/AbstractRequest.html[AbstractRequest] and the `response` method contains the link:http://github.com/rails/rails/tree/master/actionpack/lib/action_controller/response.rb[response object] representing what is going to be sent back to the client.
=== The request ===
-The request object contains a lot of useful information about the request coming in from the client. To get a full list of the available methods, refer to the "Rails API documentation":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/AbstractRequest.html
+The request object contains a lot of useful information about the request coming in from the client. To get a full list of the available methods, refer to the link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/AbstractRequest.html[API documentation].
* host - The hostname used for this request.
* domain - The hostname without the first part (usually "www").
@@ -1,16 +1,14 @@
== Rescue ==
-TODO: s/environment/local or public/
-
-Most likely your application is going to contain bugs or otherwise throw an exception that needs to be handled. For example, if the user follows a link to a resource that no longer exists in the database, Active Record will throw the ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound exception. Rails' default exception handling displays a 500 Server Error message for all exceptions. If the application is running in the development environment, a nice traceback and some added information gets displayed so you can figure out what went wrong and deal with it. If the application is in production Rails will just display a simple "500 Server Error" message to the user, or a "404 Not Found" if there was a routing error or a record could not be found. Sometimes you might want to customize how these errors are caught and how they're displayed to the user. There are several levels of exception handling available in a Rails application:
+Most likely your application is going to contain bugs or otherwise throw an exception that needs to be handled. For example, if the user follows a link to a resource that no longer exists in the database, Active Record will throw the ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound exception. Rails' default exception handling displays a 500 Server Error message for all exceptions. If the request was made locally, a nice traceback and some added information gets displayed so you can figure out what went wrong and deal with it. If the request was remote Rails will just display a simple "500 Server Error" message to the user, or a "404 Not Found" if there was a routing error or a record could not be found. Sometimes you might want to customize how these errors are caught and how they're displayed to the user. There are several levels of exception handling available in a Rails application:
=== The default 500 and 404 templates ===
By default a production application will render either a 404 or a 500 error message. These messages are contained in static HTML files in the `public` folder, in `404.html` and `500.html` respectively. You can customize these files to add some extra information and layout, but remember that they are static; i.e. you can't use RHTML or layouts in them, just plain HTML.
=== `rescue_from` ===
-If you want to do something a bit more elaborate when catching errors, you can use "rescue_from":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Rescue/ClassMethods.html#M000620, which handles exceptions of a certain type (or multiple types) in an entire controller and its subclasses. When an exception occurs which is caught by a rescue_from directive, the exception object is passed to the handler. The handler can be a method or a Proc object passed to the `:with` option. You can also use a block directly instead of an explicit Proc object.
+If you want to do something a bit more elaborate when catching errors, you can use link::http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Rescue/ClassMethods.html#M000620[rescue_from], which handles exceptions of a certain type (or multiple types) in an entire controller and its subclasses. When an exception occurs which is caught by a rescue_from directive, the exception object is passed to the handler. The handler can be a method or a Proc object passed to the `:with` option. You can also use a block directly instead of an explicit Proc object.
Let's see how we can use rescue_from to intercept all ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound errors and do something with them.
@@ -66,11 +64,11 @@ private
end
-----------------------------------
-NOTE: Certain exceptions are only rescuable from the ApplicationController class, as they are raised before the controller gets initialized and the action gets executed. See Partik Naik's "article":http://m.onkey.org/2008/7/20/rescue-from-dispatching on the subject for more information.
+NOTE: Certain exceptions are only rescuable from the ApplicationController class, as they are raised before the controller gets initialized and the action gets executed. See Partik Naik's link:http://m.onkey.org/2008/7/20/rescue-from-dispatching[article] on the subject for more information.
=== `rescue_action` ===
-The `rescue_from` method was added to make it easier to rescue different kinds of exceptions and deal with each separately. Action Controller has a default method which intercepts *all* exceptions raised, `rescue_action`. You can override this method in a controller or in ApplicationController to rescue all exceptions raised in that particular context. You can get a little bit more granular by using the "rescue_action_in_public":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Rescue.html#M000615 and "rescue_action_locally":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Rescue.html#M000618 methods which are used to rescue actions for public and local requests. Let's see how the User::NotAuthorized exception could be caught using this technique:
+The `rescue_from` method was added to make it easier to rescue different kinds of exceptions and deal with each separately. Action Controller has a default method which intercepts *all* exceptions raised, `rescue_action`. You can override this method in a controller or in ApplicationController to rescue all exceptions raised in that particular context. You can get a little bit more granular by using the link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Rescue.html#M000615[rescue_action_in_public] and link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Rescue.html#M000618[rescue_action_locally] methods which are used to rescue actions for public and local requests. Let's see how the User::NotAuthorized exception could be caught using this technique:
[source, ruby]
----------------------------------------
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ config.action_controller.session_store = :active_record_store
=== Disabling the session ===
-Sometimes you don't need a session, and you can turn it off to avoid the unnecessary overhead. To do this, use the "session":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/SessionManagement/ClassMethods.html#M000649 class method in your controller:
+Sometimes you don't need a session, and you can turn it off to avoid the unnecessary overhead. To do this, use the link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/SessionManagement/ClassMethods.html#M000649[session] class method in your controller:
[source, ruby]
------------------------------------------
@@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ class LoginsController < ApplicationController
end
------------------------------------------
-To reset the entire session, use "reset_session":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Base.html#M000855
+To reset the entire session, use link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Base.html#M000855[reset_session].
=== The flash ===
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
== Streaming and file downloads ==
-Sometimes you may want to send a file to the user instead of rendering an HTML page. All controllers in Rails have the "send_data":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Streaming.html#M000624 and the "send_file":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Streaming.html#M000623 methods, that will both stream data to the client. `send_file` is a convenience method which lets you provide the name of a file on the disk and it will stream the contents of that file for you.
+Sometimes you may want to send a file to the user instead of rendering an HTML page. All controllers in Rails have the link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Streaming.html#M000624[send_data] and the link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Streaming.html#M000623[send_file] methods, that will both stream data to the client. `send_file` is a convenience method which lets you provide the name of a file on the disk and it will stream the contents of that file for you.
To stream data to the client, use `send_data`:
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
== Verification ==
-Verifications make sure certain criterias are met in order for a controller or action to run. They can specify that a certain key (or several keys in the form of an array) is present in the `params`, `session` or `flash` hashes or that a certain HTTP method was used or that the request was made using XMLHTTPRequest (Ajax). The default action taken when these criterias are not met is to render a 400 Bad Request response, but you can customize this by specifying a redirect URL or rendering something else and you can also add flash messages and HTTP headers to the response. It is described in the "API documentation":http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Verification/ClassMethods.html as "essentially a special kind of before_filter".
+Verifications make sure certain criterias are met in order for a controller or action to run. They can specify that a certain key (or several keys in the form of an array) is present in the `params`, `session` or `flash` hashes or that a certain HTTP method was used or that the request was made using XMLHTTPRequest (Ajax). The default action taken when these criterias are not met is to render a 400 Bad Request response, but you can customize this by specifying a redirect URL or rendering something else and you can also add flash messages and HTTP headers to the response. It is described in the link:http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Verification/ClassMethods.html[API codumentation] as "essentially a special kind of before_filter".
Let's see how we can use verification to make sure the user supplies a username and a password in order to log in:

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