Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with
or
.
Download ZIP
Browse files

Merge branch 'master' of github.com:rails/docrails

  • Loading branch information...
commit c2fa85f48124fe69a420139360d1369016296e62 2 parents 2ff138b + e507193
@vijaydev vijaydev authored
View
4 actionpack/RUNNING_UNIT_TESTS.rdoc
@@ -8,10 +8,10 @@ Rake can be found at http://rake.rubyforge.org.
== Running by hand
-To run a single test suite
+Run a single test suite:
rake test TEST=path/to/test.rb
-which can be further narrowed down to one test:
+Run one test in a test suite:
rake test TEST=path/to/test.rb TESTOPTS="--name=test_something"
View
4 activerecord/lib/active_record/connection_adapters/connection_specification.rb
@@ -62,8 +62,8 @@ def uri_parser
# Converts the query parameters of the URI into a hash.
#
- # "localhost?pool=5&reap_frequency=2"
- # # => { "pool" => "5", "reap_frequency" => "2" }
+ # "localhost?pool=5&reaping_frequency=2"
+ # # => { "pool" => "5", "reaping_frequency" => "2" }
#
# returns empty hash if no query present.
#
View
5 activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/load_error.rb
@@ -7,6 +7,7 @@ class LoadError
]
unless method_defined?(:path)
+ # Returns the path which was unable to be loaded.
def path
@path ||= begin
REGEXPS.find do |regex|
@@ -17,9 +18,11 @@ def path
end
end
+ # Returns true if the given path name (except perhaps for the ".rb"
+ # extension) is the missing file which caused the exception to be raised.
def is_missing?(location)
location.sub(/\.rb$/, '') == path.sub(/\.rb$/, '')
end
end
-MissingSourceFile = LoadError
+MissingSourceFile = LoadError
View
7 activesupport/lib/active_support/core_ext/thread.rb
@@ -62,6 +62,13 @@ def thread_variable?(key)
_locals.has_key?(key.to_sym)
end
+ # Freezes the thread so that thread local variables cannot be set via
+ # Thread#thread_variable_set, nor can fiber local variables be set.
+ #
+ # me = Thread.current
+ # me.freeze
+ # me.thread_variable_set(:oliver, "a") #=> RuntimeError: can't modify frozen thread locals
+ # me[:oliver] = "a" #=> RuntimeError: can't modify frozen thread locals
def freeze
_locals.freeze
super
View
6 guides/source/active_support_core_extensions.md
@@ -2910,7 +2910,7 @@ NOTE: Defined in `active_support/core_ext/hash/indifferent_access.rb`.
### Compacting
-The methods `compact` and `compact!` return a Hash without items with `nil` value.
+The methods `compact` and `compact!` return a Hash without items with `nil` value.
```ruby
{a: 1, b: 2, c: nil}.compact # => {a: 1, b: 2}
@@ -3837,7 +3837,7 @@ rescue NameError => e
end
```
-NOTE: Defined in `actionpack/lib/abstract_controller/helpers.rb`.
+NOTE: Defined in `active_support/core_ext/name_error.rb`.
Extensions to `LoadError`
-------------------------
@@ -3860,4 +3860,4 @@ rescue NameError => e
end
```
-NOTE: Defined in `actionpack/lib/abstract_controller/helpers.rb`.
+NOTE: Defined in `active_support/core_ext/load_error.rb`.
View
4 guides/source/asset_pipeline.md
@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ the comment operator on that line to later enable the asset pipeline:
To set asset compression methods, set the appropriate configuration options
in `production.rb` - `config.assets.css_compressor` for your CSS and
-`config.assets.js_compressor` for your Javascript:
+`config.assets.js_compressor` for your JavaScript:
```ruby
config.assets.css_compressor = :yui
@@ -766,7 +766,7 @@ exception indicating the name of the missing file(s).
#### Far-future Expires Header
-Precompiled assets exist on the filesystem and are served directly by your web
+Precompiled assets exist on the file system and are served directly by your web
server. They do not have far-future headers by default, so to get the benefit of
fingerprinting you'll have to update your server configuration to add those
headers.
View
2  guides/source/command_line.md
@@ -254,7 +254,7 @@ $ rails generate scaffold HighScore game:string score:integer
The generator checks that there exist the directories for models, controllers, helpers, layouts, functional and unit tests, stylesheets, creates the views, controller, model and database migration for HighScore (creating the `high_scores` table and fields), takes care of the route for the **resource**, and new tests for everything.
-The migration requires that we **migrate**, that is, run some Ruby code (living in that `20130717151933_create_high_scores.rb`) to modify the schema of our database. Which database? The sqlite3 database that Rails will create for you when we run the `rake db:migrate` command. We'll talk more about Rake in-depth in a little while.
+The migration requires that we **migrate**, that is, run some Ruby code (living in that `20130717151933_create_high_scores.rb`) to modify the schema of our database. Which database? The SQLite3 database that Rails will create for you when we run the `rake db:migrate` command. We'll talk more about Rake in-depth in a little while.
```bash
$ rake db:migrate
View
14 guides/source/configuring.md
@@ -644,11 +644,9 @@ development:
encoding: unicode
database: blog_development
pool: 5
- username: blog
- password:
```
-Prepared Statements can be disabled thus:
+Prepared Statements are enabled by default on PostgreSQL. You can be disable prepared statements by setting `prepared_statements` to `false`:
```yaml
production:
@@ -656,6 +654,16 @@ production:
prepared_statements: false
```
+If enabled, Active Record will create up to `1000` prepared statements per database connection by default. To modify this behavior you can set `statement_limit` to a different value:
+
+```
+production:
+ adapter: postgresql
+ statement_limit: 200
+```
+
+The more prepared statements in use: the more memory your database will require. If your PostgreSQL database is hitting memory limits, try lowering `statement_limit` or disabling prepared statements.
+
#### Configuring an SQLite3 Database for JRuby Platform
If you choose to use SQLite3 and are using JRuby, your `config/database.yml` will look a little different. Here's the development section:
View
236 guides/source/contributing_to_ruby_on_rails.md
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ Please don't put "feature request" items into GitHub Issues. If there's a new
feature that you want to see added to Ruby on Rails, you'll need to write the
code yourself - or convince someone else to partner with you to write the code.
Later in this guide you'll find detailed instructions for proposing a patch to
-Ruby on Rails. If you enter a wishlist item in GitHub Issues with no code, you
+Ruby on Rails. If you enter a wish list item in GitHub Issues with no code, you
can expect it to be marked "invalid" as soon as it's reviewed.
Sometimes, the line between 'bug' and 'feature' is a hard one to draw.
@@ -69,89 +69,6 @@ won't be accepted." But it's the proper place to discuss new ideas. GitHub
Issues are not a particularly good venue for the sometimes long and involved
discussions new features require.
-Setting Up a Development Environment
-------------------------------------
-
-To move on from submitting bugs to helping resolve existing issues or contributing your own code to Ruby on Rails, you _must_ be able to run its test suite. In this section of the guide you'll learn how to set up the tests on your own computer.
-
-### The Easy Way
-
-The easiest and recommended way to get a development environment ready to hack is to use the [Rails development box](https://github.com/rails/rails-dev-box).
-
-### The Hard Way
-
-In case you can't use the Rails development box, see section above, check [this other guide](development_dependencies_install.html).
-
-
-Running an Application Against Your Local Branch
-------------------------------------------------
-
-The `--dev` flag of `rails new` generates an application that uses your local
-branch:
-
-```bash
-$ cd rails
-$ bundle exec rails new ~/my-test-app --dev
-```
-
-The application generated in `~/my-test-app` runs against your local branch
-and in particular sees any modifications upon server reboot.
-
-
-Testing Active Record
----------------------
-
-This is how you run the Active Record test suite only for SQLite3:
-
-```bash
-$ cd activerecord
-$ bundle exec rake test_sqlite3
-```
-
-You can now run the tests as you did for `sqlite3`. The tasks are respectively
-
-```bash
-test_mysql
-test_mysql2
-test_postgresql
-```
-
-Finally,
-
-```bash
-$ bundle exec rake test
-```
-
-will now run the four of them in turn.
-
-You can also run any single test separately:
-
-```bash
-$ ARCONN=sqlite3 ruby -Itest test/cases/associations/has_many_associations_test.rb
-```
-
-You can invoke `test_jdbcmysql`, `test_jdbcsqlite3` or `test_jdbcpostgresql` also. See the file `activerecord/RUNNING_UNIT_TESTS.rdoc` for information on running more targeted database tests, or the file `ci/travis.rb` for the test suite run by the continuous integration server.
-
-### Warnings
-
-The test suite runs with warnings enabled. Ideally, Ruby on Rails should issue no warnings, but there may be a few, as well as some from third-party libraries. Please ignore (or fix!) them, if any, and submit patches that do not issue new warnings.
-
-If you are sure about what you are doing and would like to have a more clear output, there's a way to override the flag:
-
-```bash
-$ RUBYOPT=-W0 bundle exec rake test
-```
-
-### Older Versions of Ruby on Rails
-
-If you want to add a fix to older versions of Ruby on Rails, you'll need to set up and switch to your own local tracking branch. Here is an example to switch to the 3-0-stable branch:
-
-```bash
-$ git branch --track 3-0-stable origin/3-0-stable
-$ git checkout 3-0-stable
-```
-
-TIP: You may want to [put your Git branch name in your shell prompt](http://qugstart.com/blog/git-and-svn/add-colored-git-branch-name-to-your-shell-prompt/) to make it easier to remember which version of the code you're working with.
Helping to Resolve Existing Issues
----------------------------------
@@ -227,9 +144,21 @@ WARNING: Docrails has a very strict policy: no code can be touched whatsoever, n
Contributing to the Rails Code
------------------------------
-### Clone the Rails Repository
+### Setting Up a Development Environment ###
+
+To move on from submitting bugs to helping resolve existing issues or contributing your own code to Ruby on Rails, you _must_ be able to run its test suite. In this section of the guide you'll learn how to setup the tests on your own computer.
+
+#### The Easy Way
+
+The easiest and recommended way to get a development environment ready to hack is to use the [Rails development box](https://github.com/rails/rails-dev-box).
+
+#### The Hard Way
+
+In case you can't use the Rails development box, see section above, check [this other guide](development_dependencies_install.html).
-The first thing you need to do to be able to contribute code is to clone the repository:
+### Clone the Rails Repository ###
+
+To be able to contribute code, you need to clone the Rails repository:
```bash
$ git clone git://github.com/rails/rails.git
@@ -244,29 +173,31 @@ $ git checkout -b my_new_branch
It doesn't matter much what name you use, because this branch will only exist on your local computer and your personal repository on GitHub. It won't be part of the Rails Git repository.
-### Write Your Code
+### Running an Application Against Your Local Branch ###
+
+In case you need a dummy Rails app to test changes, the `--dev` flag of `rails new` generates an application that uses your local branch:
+
+```bash
+$ cd rails
+$ bundle exec rails new ~/my-test-app --dev
+```
+
+The application generated in `~/my-test-app` runs against your local branch
+and in particular sees any modifications upon server reboot.
-Now get busy and add or edit code. You're on your branch now, so you can write whatever you want (you can check to make sure you're on the right branch with `git branch -a`). But if you're planning to submit your change back for inclusion in Rails, keep a few things in mind:
+### Write Your Code ###
+
+Now get busy and add/edit code. You're on your branch now, so you can write whatever you want (you can check to make sure you're on the right branch with `git branch -a`). But if you're planning to submit your change back for inclusion in Rails, keep a few things in mind:
* Get the code right.
* Use Rails idioms and helpers.
* Include tests that fail without your code, and pass with it.
* Update the (surrounding) documentation, examples elsewhere, and the guides: whatever is affected by your contribution.
-It is not customary in Rails to run the full test suite before pushing
-changes. The railties test suite in particular takes a long time, and even
-more if the source code is mounted in `/vagrant` as happens in the recommended
-workflow with the [rails-dev-box](https://github.com/rails/rails-dev-box).
-
-As a compromise, test what your code obviously affects, and if the change is
-not in railties, run the whole test suite of the affected component. If all
-tests are passing, that's enough to propose your contribution. We have
-[Travis CI](https://travis-ci.org/rails/rails) as a safety net for catching
-unexpected breakages elsewhere.
TIP: Changes that are cosmetic in nature and do not add anything substantial to the stability, functionality, or testability of Rails will generally not be accepted.
-### Follow the Coding Conventions
+#### Follow the Coding Conventions
Rails follows a simple set of coding style conventions:
@@ -284,7 +215,84 @@ Rails follows a simple set of coding style conventions:
The above are guidelines - please use your best judgment in using them.
-### Updating the CHANGELOG
+### Running Tests ###
+It is not customary in Rails to run the full test suite before pushing
+changes. The railties test suite in particular takes a long time, and even
+more if the source code is mounted in `/vagrant` as happens in the recommended
+workflow with the [rails-dev-box](https://github.com/rails/rails-dev-box).
+
+As a compromise, test what your code obviously affects, and if the change is
+not in railties, run the whole test suite of the affected component. If all
+tests are passing, that's enough to propose your contribution. We have
+[Travis CI](https://travis-ci.org/rails/rails) as a safety net for catching
+unexpected breakages elsewhere.
+
+#### Entire Rails:
+To run all the tests, do:
+```bash
+$ cd rails
+$ bundle exec rake test
+```
+#### Particular component of Rails
+To run tests only for particular component(ActionPack, ActiveRecord, etc.). For
+example, to run `ActionMailer` tests you can:
+
+```bash
+$ cd actionmailer
+$ bundle exec rake test
+```
+
+##### Testing Active Record
+
+This is how you run the Active Record test suite only for SQLite3:
+
+```bash
+$ cd activerecord
+$ bundle exec rake test_sqlite3
+```
+
+You can now run the tests as you did for `sqlite3`. The tasks are respectively
+
+```bash
+test_mysql
+test_mysql2
+test_postgresql
+```
+
+Finally,
+
+```bash
+$ bundle exec rake test
+```
+
+will now run the four of them in turn.
+
+You can also run any single test separately:
+
+```bash
+$ ARCONN=sqlite3 ruby -Itest test/cases/associations/has_many_associations_test.rb
+```
+
+You can invoke `test_jdbcmysql`, `test_jdbcsqlite3` or `test_jdbcpostgresql` also. See the file `activerecord/RUNNING_UNIT_TESTS.rdoc` for information on running more targeted database tests, or the file `ci/travis.rb` for the test suite run by the continuous integration server.
+
+#### Single Test separately
+to run just one test. For example, to run `LayoutMailerTest` you can:
+
+```bash
+$ cd actionmailer
+$ ruby -w -Ilib:test test/mail_layout_test.rb
+```
+
+### Warnings ###
+
+The test suite runs with warnings enabled. Ideally, Ruby on Rails should issue no warnings, but there may be a few, as well as some from third-party libraries. Please ignore (or fix!) them, if any, and submit patches that do not issue new warnings.
+
+If you are sure about what you are doing and would like to have a more clear output, there's a way to override the flag:
+
+```bash
+$ RUBYOPT=-W0 bundle exec rake test
+```
+### Updating the CHANGELOG ###
The CHANGELOG is an important part of every release. It keeps the list of changes for every Rails version.
@@ -309,17 +317,17 @@ A CHANGELOG entry should summarize what was changed and should end with author's
Your name can be added directly after the last word if you don't provide any code examples or don't need multiple paragraphs. Otherwise, it's best to make as a new paragraph.
-### Sanity Check
+### Sanity Check ###
You should not be the only person who looks at the code before you submit it.
If you know someone else who uses Rails, try asking them if they'll check out
your work. If you don't know anyone else using Rails, try hopping into the IRC
-room or posting about your idea to the rails-core mailing list. Doing this in
-private before you push a patch out publicly is the smoke test for a patch:
-if you cant convince one other developer of the beauty of your code, you’re
+room or posting about your idea to the rails-core mailing list. Doing this in
+private before you push a patch out publicly is the "smoke test" for a patch:
+if you can't convince one other developer of the beauty of your code, you’re
unlikely to convince the core team either.
-### Commit Your Changes
+### Commit Your Changes ###
When you're happy with the code on your computer, you need to commit the changes to Git:
@@ -359,7 +367,7 @@ You can also add bullet points:
TIP. Please squash your commits into a single commit when appropriate. This simplifies future cherry picks, and also keeps the git log clean.
-### Update Your Branch
+### Update Your Branch ###
It's pretty likely that other changes to master have happened while you were working. Go get them:
@@ -377,7 +385,7 @@ $ git rebase master
No conflicts? Tests still pass? Change still seems reasonable to you? Then move on.
-### Fork
+### Fork ###
Navigate to the Rails [GitHub repository](https://github.com/rails/rails) and press "Fork" in the upper right hand corner.
@@ -507,7 +515,19 @@ $ git push origin my_pull_request -f
You should be able to refresh the pull request on GitHub and see that it has
been updated.
-### Backporting
+
+### Older Versions of Ruby on Rails ###
+
+If you want to add a fix to older versions of Ruby on Rails, you'll need to set up and switch to your own local tracking branch. Here is an example to switch to the 3-0-stable branch:
+
+```bash
+$ git branch --track 3-0-stable origin/3-0-stable
+$ git checkout 3-0-stable
+```
+
+TIP: You may want to [put your Git branch name in your shell prompt](http://qugstart.com/blog/git-and-svn/add-colored-git-branch-name-to-your-shell-prompt/) to make it easier to remember which version of the code you're working with.
+
+#### Backporting
Changes that are merged into master are intended for the next major release of Rails. Sometimes, it might be beneficial for your changes to propagate back to the maintenance releases for older stable branches. Generally, security fixes and bug fixes are good candidates for a backport, while new features and patches that introduce a change in behavior will not be accepted. When in doubt, it is best to consult a Rails team member before backporting your changes to avoid wasted effort.
View
2  guides/source/testing.md
@@ -796,7 +796,7 @@ when you initiate a Rails project.
Brief Note About `MiniTest`
-----------------------------
-Ruby ships with a boat load of libraries. Ruby 1.8 provides `Test::Unit`, a framework for unit testing in Ruby. All the basic assertions discussed above are actually defined in `Test::Unit::Assertions`. The class `ActiveSupport::TestCase` which we have been using in our unit and functional tests extends `Test::Unit::TestCase`, allowing
+Ruby ships with a vast Standard Library for all common use-cases including testing. Ruby 1.8 provided `Test::Unit`, a framework for unit testing in Ruby. All the basic assertions discussed above are actually defined in `Test::Unit::Assertions`. The class `ActiveSupport::TestCase` which we have been using in our unit and functional tests extends `Test::Unit::TestCase`, allowing
us to use all of the basic assertions in our tests.
Ruby 1.9 introduced `MiniTest`, an updated version of `Test::Unit` which provides a backwards compatible API for `Test::Unit`. You could also use `MiniTest` in Ruby 1.8 by installing the `minitest` gem.
Please sign in to comment.
Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.